Skip to main content

Full text of "The Buccaneer"

See other formats


GENERAL COLLEGE 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://www.archive.org/details/buccaneer1974east 




BUCCANEER 71 

EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY I A 






linistration 

faculty '.'.'.'. 

A x, Graduates 

"»••• Seniors 

.Juniors 

Sophomores . . .' 

Freshmen ' 

Who's Who among Students 

Organizations 

^Features 

. IWGreat Debate: ECU's Med School 

Joyrier Library — gettin' better every day! 

~*jflte "Ite Greek to Me!" * . . 

t-'.'CurtainUp! 

fa »..,._. . .... _ . ._ 



' „ Gjeftnville, N. C.— Fun City, U. S. A 

^T»^played Replay: the 1973-74 Sports Scene t • ■ • 

' \' >_ "Times Have Changed (and we ain't whistlin' "Dixie") . 

A University Survives Puberty I 

"Home" .4 

tiZU MUCK-IN-EAR 

''^Senior Summaries/Index .... 

Senior Summaries 

•Index 

^Specifications/ Acknowledgements 



™ 


*i v'ft : 

64 




rv • 


. .64* t 
. .65 
.'S3 




•TV 


. .98 
. >114 




• 


.•^131* 

* • >\ 

.141 
.201 




I 


m ••• 




. .214 




. . 


. .222 


•i 


< 


. .232 
. .236 
. .256 


: 


>• 


, .260 


, 



Iy* 



w*.*> 



f 



5 r 



t 


f\ 


r 




^ 

^2f 




W\\ I 


- it *< 
it? 


* 


■ , ' ■ 




• 


Ml 

1 

f 


i 

i 

1 


i 
i 

I- 


If! 


4 


■ 1 


1 












K 



f -\ 






*##*■ 



/ :» 
















rjLv" ^ 
















- '. 


Si:'. 







4 /[); 




Impressions 5 




n Impressions 




Impressions 




« I!! : ' > .SlllliS 




Impressions 3 




/ni/iM 'ssi i iri' II 




Impressions 13 




14 Impressions 




fmpressions 15 




16 Impr< lions 




Impressions 17 




18 Impressions 




/mpressions 19 




david smith 



20 Impressions 




Impressions 21 




chip lambeth 



22 Impressions 




steve walker 



Impressions 23 




24 fmpressi'ons 




Impressions 25 



' 



Those of us who have been at ECU since 
the great boycott/visitation marches/ 
Fountainhead obscenity case of 1970-71 
seem to have been through just about 
everything by now. We've seen the rise of 
the student movement, the immediate de- 
cline of the same, and now: streaking. 

The inclusion of streaking along with stu- 
dent politics may seem inappropriate at 
first. However, ECU's student issues have 
never stemmed from earth-shaking things; 
the war in Vietnam caused only token in- 
terest, but visitation nearly had the campus 
in shards. ECU has always been what major 
campuses have only now become, a private- 
interest campus. We are, in short, interest- 
ed in our local cosmos. 

Some observers claim that streaking at 
ECU is indicative of a great human/sexual 
awakening; the liberation of the student, 
and see tremendous social significance in 
nude running. A less profound thought is 
that streaking beats sitting around the Rat 
or the Crow's Nest, and is less trite than yet 
another parity raid. This editor can't agree 
fully with the "social significance" argu- 
ment; however, when you consider the 
progress made at ECU in general terms, 
streaking must fit in somewhere. 

Four years ago getting visitation back 
was a vision of sorts, with students-versus- 
the Board of Trustees, and a march down 
Fifth Street — just to have co-ed visitation 
from 12 to 12. Today visitation is uniform, 
with one co-ed dorm and promise of a 
second. Four years ago this newspaper was 
under fire for printing obscenities, with 
students cheering on one side and adminis- 
tration and Greenville citizens writhing on 
the other. This year, the Buccaneer came 
out with at least half a dozen items which 
were declared either objectionable or ob- 
scene by critics. Instead of re-establishing 
the old students-administration rift, every- 
one established his or her own view of the 
matter. Most people simply said, "So what 
else is new?" and went about their 
business. 

There have been changes in four years; 
we've seen a developing maturity in ECU 
students, or at least in student attitudes. 
And even the crowds who gather to watch 
streakers, or who participate in streaking, 
don't have the semi-obscene nature of the 
old panty-raiders. There's shouting, all 
right, and kidding around, but it's a cele- 
bration of sorts — no one's there just to 
stare or watch bodies. As for nudity — "So 
what else is new?"; but as a celebration of 



'■■^!^V : \:^- 



being alive, and of feeling secure enough 
and confident enough in living to streak, 
ind of bringing in Spring with something 
nore natural than a panty raid or a three- 
day hangover, you can't beat streaking. 
No, streaking doesn't signify any great 
new social order. It's basically a friendly 
sort of thing, rather brotherly-sisterly, and 
marks for all its convival madness, another 
small change at ECU, from the expected to 
the human. At least today, before it's hit 
the stage of triteness, nothing could be less 
indecent than streaking. 

pat Crawford 

march 7, 1974 Fountainhead editorial 




" ' 




charlns griffin 



Passing on the street, conversing in the halls, 

Just a glance or a word or two. 

Brief encounters of great influence 

That come to mind years later 

In reflections of times both good and had. 

Impressions . . . 

Here now, gone in a moment. 

fust important enough to implant memories 

That become twisted and jumbied, 

Often iost in the mass confusion of thought. 

Life . . . 

A continuous pattern of impressions. 

Reflections that continue to become one 

Yet split to become many 

To enlighten or sadden each new day. 

Everything acknowledged 

Leaves an impression upon the mind. 

Impressions, reflections, memories . . . 

Necessities in life, motivation for emotion 

For lacking would he stoic and dead. 

monika Sutherland 



30 Imp, 



I * 






m* 








n 




/ 



m* 



%k 



^/ 



t£ ik'\ 



'bstf £>'.?-. 



: & 



vf&l** 







32 Impressions 




^impressions 33 




William toney 



34 Impress)'. 




u illiiim loni'N 



impressions 35 




uilliam tones' 



36 Impressions 




William ton<:\ 



Impressions 37 




david smith 



38 /ni/iressions 



AS THEY SEEM. . . 

I watched as the water trickled over the broken rocks 

And spilled its liquid laughter 

In ever-widening circles on the pond. 

And 1 marveled at the coldness of its touch on my palm. 

When all the world was sunny and warm. 

Things are not always as (hey seem. 

1 watched as a snake slithered into the water, 

And his motions were as fluid as the substance which buoyed him. 

He was a patchwork of green, gold, and grey. 

His beauty hypnotized me. 

Then he struck and killed a baby loon. 

Things are not always as they seem. 

I watched a plane fly overhead — 

A wonder of technology — 

Its wings and body silver against the blazing sky. 

Then it dumped its load of insecticide over a field. 

I could see the animals flee to find clearer air to breathe. 

Things are not always as they seem. 

1 watched an old man walk softly through the trees. 

He picked his way carefully among the underbrush. 

He stopped suddenly, and for the first time 

I could hear the panicked squeals of a trapped animal. 

Then he reached down and removed the animal from the trap. 

I noticed with cold anger the hunting bag on his back. 

But he sat down on a fallen log 

And making sure the creature was unharmed, 

He soothed its fears 

And let it go. 

Things are not always as they seem. 

helen mar i arm e creech 



Impressions 39 




40 Impressions 




richard goldman 



Impressions 41 



i 



H 




yjp&Sj 


@j 


• 




tS 






i'm almost moved in 
it's lonely 
and quiet 

i hear distant voices 
muttered and matted music 
laughter that has no jokes to go with it 
the clock ticks 

and steps are heard in the hall 
and cars drive by 
it's dark outside 
and lonely 

like everyone is living in a silent world 
with glass walls 

there are so many people living all at once 
and anything is happening 
but no one knows 
who speaks the words 
who sings the songs 
who laughs 

who walks down the hall or 
where the cars are going 
debe hicks 



Nielson at the Lectern 

This morning once again, as yesterday, 
I'll stand at lecture here. Each time 1 start 
Impassive, stony faces meet my eyes 
With flagrant unconcern. They sense a fear. 
Oh, let me touch you, children! Smile at me! 

I stare, dumb, at the words that I will read 

Today, choking words that glue my throat 

Like so much muciJage or so much paste 

And strangle thoughts before they can be voiced: 

Michelangelo's life, his painting 

A ceiling on his back, creating both 

Creation and a pitiless demise, 

The way the other Michelangelo 
Seems to have died, murdered as he was 
And by a nameless infamy whose sin 
Against humanity has not been fathomed, 
Yet who could not have known the power in 
Those hands, that face, that Puckish, girlish face 
He painted often, painted lovingly: 
Symmetric, feminine. 

God, to have been 
His i over J 

Michelangelo liked boys, they say, 

And he was sought by ciergy, sought by popes. 

Then here am I. An aging, dying man, 

I see myseJf grown senile, toothless, soft: 

How will I face a mirror, or a glass? 

Uncreative — but J appreciate 

And that is half of art. Someone must look: 

Someone must love. Perhaps I'll grow a beard. 

To touch those hands! Those magic, artist's hands 

That painted God so real He seems to fall, 

That fondled young King David in the everlasting stone. 

Who must have stood for that? Who felt the eyes 

Of Michelangelo caress his adolescence? 

So David danced before his Lord. The Lord, 

If He appreciates aesthetic things, 

Small wonder He crowned David as His king! 

Still, what of me? What canvasses would I 
Cover with the passion that was his? 
The form? The color? Could I if I would? 



46 /mpres 



Children, will you teach a balding fixture 
The artistry of youth? Will your lithe limbs, 
Your musky bodies (so in contrast here 
With my forced, feigned respectability 
All Listerined and Old Spice aftershaved] 
Turn them toward me! Turn them toward a man 
Who comes to you as Michelangelo 
Lacking just his gift, his artist's hands. 
I see you in the mind with no less dream 
Or vision in my heart. 

There is a child 
Who has come early in the room today, 
I see him; he stares through me to the wall. 
Would Michelangelo have sculptured that 
Or would he, jealous, guard from others' eyes 
The muscle and the sinew and the warmth 
That will not last, that cannot he preserved? 

He must have loved the Virgin very much. 
Why else provide her with a young man's arm? 

The other had no popes, but he had friends: 
A life so different from his work, and yet 
Because, they say, religious at the end 
Though stabbed to death beside a Roman whore. 
Christ too, of course, found Mary Magdalene 
Not, shall we say, in Temple on her knees. 

Those grinning boys he painted in his youth.' 
Triumphant Eros smiling so you'd think 
With such a puzzled near self consciousness 
The painter had just told an obscene joke 
The boy could only partly comprehend 
So laughed full loud to hid his ignorance. 

Still, Monte paid more than d'Arpino could 

And so the second Michelangelo 

Became religious, painted holy saints 

Old Matthew and the Virgin's bloated corpse, 

And so he died. A moral must be there. 

doug mc reynolds 



impressions 47 




**^ 




■- 



Before Jason there was no one, 
only emptiness and despair, 
and then he taught me to laugh 
unci / saw things through a different light. 

There is no love to compare with a child's, 
no smile can say as much as his. 



And now, no one can take his place 
my Jason. 

kathv jones 



48 Impressions 




trespassing on minutes 

life walks 

bereaving, bestowing 

from year to year 

the parting words of warriors 

whispered on December's deathbed 

become only silhouettes 

reflected in a memory mirror 

and the infants' January cry 

the prologue of procreation 

now in the age of Superman and Wonderwnmun 

heaven and earth 

embedded in zenith 

entwine titanic tbighs 

mountain und valley merge 

sword impregnates deita 

yielding generations 

Darwin, the godfather 

of these Spartan sons, 

smiles at the colossal conception 

blessing the future of the fittest 

teresa speighl 



49 Jmjjn 




50 Impressions 




i had no choice; 
it was set before me 
and i was forced to try it 
though i hungered not 

at first 

i disliked its acridity, 
its dual flavor of 
acidity and baseness, 
but now i've acquired 
a taste for life 

teresa speight 



Impr 




ussions 




f// c m r js, 







BUCCANEER 71 

PEOPLE I n 




Administration 57 




58 .AWmimslrulion 



Adminis- 
tration 




&if*tfi 




4 ^ 



ilcj 



Alexander. S Rudolph 
Bailey. Donald E 
Baker, WorlhE 
Boudreaux, Robert M 
Boyelle. Joseph G 



le Deon of Student Affairs 
Deon of Ceneral College 



ancol Aid Officer 
f Graduate School 



Buck.Melvm V 
Capwell. Richard L 
Cullop. Charles P 
Fulghurrt. Carolyn 
Holl.RoberlL 



,e.John 
ell. |ohnM 



. C Frede 
.. Malenel 



Lang.|ohnA.|r 
Leggelt. Donald Y 



Direclor of Personnel 

Deon of College of Arls 6- Sciences 

Associate Dean of Craduale School 

Dean of Women 

Vice-Chancellor and Deon 

Dean of Admissions 

Provosl 



clor of Sladenl Heollh Service 
Dir ofDev Evaluation Clim 
Director of Placemenl Burea 

Chancellor (or External Affair 
Direclor of Alumni Affair 
Direclor of Physical Plor 



McDi 
Rowe.Claib 
Smith. Nanc 



Sus, 



Assi 






IDea 



I Provosl 
nofMen 



Assislanl Deon of Women 
Threewills. George Assislanl Direclor of Public Relations 
Tucker, lames H Deon of Sludenl Affairs 

Ussery. Robert M. Direclor of Inslilulional Research 

Vainnght, |ulian R Assistant to the Business Manager 



Weigand.Ce 
While. Henn 



Willis. Thorr 
Woolen. Dar 



of Cuidonce and Counseling 

Director of Accounting 

oordinolor of Special Projects 

Oir of Regional Dev Inslitule 

Director of Housing 




Jf| Faculty 




Acev 


z.Luis 






foreign Languages 


Mlei 


CarIG 






Physics 


A,me 


a. Rame 


hC 




Physics 


Arledge. Alice 






Education 




e.Thelm 


a Child Deve 


lopm 


ent&Fomi/y Relations 


Arwood, Frank 






Elementary Education 


Bailey 


Carlan 


F 




Continuing Education 


Baker 


Iral. 






English 


Baro. 


ose 






Foreign Languages 


Bassm 


an. Mich 


lei 




Foreign Languages 


Beard 


en. |ame 


H 




Business 


Becke 


.Laura 


Speech. Lang 


uage 


fr Auditory Pathology 



Administration 59 



Ben|amm. Lloyd W 
Berrier.lohnD 
Bezanson, Warren B 
Birchard. Ralph E 
Bishop. Bobby A 
Bland. Charles E 



Blok. |ack H 
Boone, Roberl L 
Boyce. Emily S. 
Brandon. Dorothy 
Briley.Anne 
Brinson. Mark M. 
Broadhursl.Rulh 



ovi. Wayne 
rown, Charles Q 
rown. Roberl M. 
rowning. Hazel 
rulon.EarlD.Jr 
unger. Roberl I. 



Byrd. lames W 
Carroll. Diana 
Chamberlain. Charh 
Chanlrill.|amesA 
Clark. Amos O 
Clemens. Donald F 
Cohle. Charles R 



English 

Geogrophy t 

Geology 

Biology 



Ijeogniphv 
llrolth I* Physical Educulion 






Institutional Development 

Education 

Nursing 

Sociology & Anthropology 



Colcord] Marshall 


Accounting 


Collins. Donald E 


Library Science 


Collins. William H 


Business 


Conglelon, Donna 


English 


Connelly. Ernest] 


Library Science 


Corwin. Belly 


Psychology 


Coulter, Byron L 


Physics 


Cramer. Roberl 


1 .('ri^I ,J(,||\ 


Creech. Roger L 


Malhemalics 


Crickmore. Vivian 


Conlmuing Educulion 


Chrislman. Russell M 


English 


Dancy, Donald R 


Allied Health 


Daniel, Hal] Speech 


, Language h Auditory Polhology 


Daniels. Frances 


Business Education 


Daughterly, Patricia 


Bi.ilngi 


Davis, Dennis C 


Physical Therapy 


Davis. Graham | 


Biology 


Davis, TrenlonC 


Environmental Health 


Dehnath.Lokenath 


Malhemalics 


Debler. OuidaC 


Accounting 


Dewar.Thadys 


Business Education 



Donnalleyludith 
Downes. Sheldon C 
Durham. William H 
Eagan, Elsie 
Abbs |nhn n 
Edmislon, Roberl S 
Edmislon.Sara 



Library Science 
Allied Heollh 




tibial 1 




tf ; ***** 




fccr fe^d rj*) 




.Allied Health 



Eller. Frank W 
Eulsler. Nellvena 
Evans. Tom L 
Everett. GroverW 
Fabisch Gerald A 
Fadely. Ernest W 



Fahrner. Alvin A 
Farnham. Emily 
Fernandez. Eslher 
Fernandez, Joseph/ 



Fleming, Ruth 
Franke. Roberl H 



Fuller, Frank G 



G..rtman,W| |r 
Giles, David H 



Gross. DawyerD 



Culali.UmeshC 
Haggard. Paul W 



ll.iiiwo.id. Thomas | 



H.mkins. William W 



Hausalus, Cheryl 



Henderson Ronald F , Sr 
Herring, Elizabeth 



Foreign l.anguoges 

Foreign Languages 

Heallh * Physical Educolion 

English 

Political Science 



Educalion 

Heallh ft Physical Educolion 

Allied Heallh 

Special Educalion 
English 



Heallh ft Physical Educalion 
Philosophy 



Molhemalics 

Technology 

Physical Therapy 



Geography 

English 

-ss .Administration 

Home Economics 

Music 



Foreign Languages 



Holmes, KeilhD 
Haols. William R 



Hudson, Keith C 



lames. Kenneth C 
leltreys. Donald B 



lohnson.F Milan 
lohnson.l.udiW 
|ones, Ray I. 
lones.Ruth 
loyce, lames M 
Kelly, [ohnT 



Speech. Language ft Aud Pathology 
HomeEconomii ! 

flinlogy 



Geology 

Molhemoltcs 
Library Science 



tiny 



Phyi 



Kelly, Patricia 

Keusi h K B 
Kilpalrick.Janel 
King. Kalherine 

Knox, David 
l.apas. Marlh.i 
Lamb, Robert C 



Lambeth. H D ,]r 
Lambie Ruth 
Laniet Gene D 
Lao.Rosina 
Lao, Y | 
Laurie. lohnS 
Leahy, Edward P 



Leilh, RoberlW 

Lewis, Frederick C 
Li. Chi.i-yu 
l.im.T EdmondW 
Liltle.MonleF 



Long. Thomas E 
Loquist.IohnS 
Love. Nash W 
Lowe.Velma 
Lowrj lean 
Malherbe. Frant 



Marlin. George 
Matlheis, Floyd E 
McAllister. Warren A 
McDaniel, lames S 
McDonald, MaylonE 
McGlohon, Leah 
McGralh. Harold M 



McLendon. Waller |. 
McMillan. Douglas) 
McReynolds, Douglas 
Mitchell. Charles C 
Moe.Halvor 
Moore. Charles A 
Moore. Elizabeth 



Moore. |udy 
Moore. Miriam 
Morales. Manuel 
Mueller-Roemor.l 
Muzzarelli, Rober 
Neel, Francis L. 
Nicholson, lames I 



O'Connor. Michael P 

Owens. Phoebe 
Padgett. Richard E 
Patrick. losephF. 



Home Econom 



Counseling & l.'uid 



eullhftl'h\M.-.jll..lu 



■d Norman C 




Library Science 

Technology 

Foreign Languages 



MA 



Pwiuni.Tulliol 




Molhemolics 

Biology 

Educolion 

Educolion 

English 
Nursing 



Library Science 
Bio/ogy 
English 



Malhemalic 

Heollh ft PhvsicalEducalio 

Physn 

Physii 

Heollh ft Physical Educalio 

Home Economn 



Technology 

Library Science 

Biology 

Home Economics 

(jeogra/ih\ 



Molhemolics 

Arl 

Home Economics 

Psychology 

Drama ft Speech 

Geography 



Library Science 

I .<-M V 'r njiliv 

English 

Foreign Languages 

Polilical Science 

Nursing 

ConlinuingEducalion 



i ;»Mjlug\ 

Economics 

History 

Heollh ft PMsical Educolion 

Physics 

Allied Heollh 

Technology 



Library Science 

Allied Heollh 

Allied Heollh 

Library Science 

Business Adminislrolion 

Heallh ft Physical Educolion 

Library Science 



U.nk 


man. Da 


lelW 


Edu 


Yada 


. Genev 


i II 


Home Ecor 


Kami 


shila.Ka 


sulaka 


Politicals 




Allen, Mary H. 


Greenville 


Beaman, Jane R. 


New Bern 


Brooks, Allan F. 


Greenville 


Bullard, Kay S, 


Greenville 


Burch, James D 


Greenville 


Capeci, Robert L, 


Jacksonville 


Carawon. Roberl E. 


New Bern 


Clark, Rhonda J, 


Greenville 


Creech. Jimmy E. 


Wilmington 


Cullifer, Betty K, 


Charlolle 


Culton, Martha A. 


New Bern 


Dameron, Tim L. 


Burlington 


Daniels. William C, 


Greenville 


Dyer. Nancy E. 


Kinslon 


Folsom. Richard K. 


Fayetteville 


Freeman. Sieve A. 


Morehead City 


Fulcher. Diane 


Atlantic 


Giles. Billy E 


Greenville 


Glosson. George E. 


Burl/nglon 


Hall, Braxton B. 


Morehead City 


Harl. Raymond J. 


Southport 


Helms. Charles D. 


Greenville 


Helms. Karen G. 


Greenville 


Home. Diane F. 


Kinslon 


Huffman, William H. 


i Irt'cni die 


Johnson. Barry F. 


Greensboro 


[ones, Luther C. 


M icro 


Landsperger, Waller J. 


( Ireenslioro 


Lassiter. Lollie M. 


Ahoskie 


Lee, Do Y. 


Seoul, Korea 


Loesche, Palricia | 


Greenville 


Mann. |ody L. Colonial Heights. Va. 


Mare, Charles A. 


Greenville 


McCullough.Gary L. 


Norlina 


McLaughlin, Lee R. 


( ireeni ille 


McMann, David W. 


Greenville 


Mowbray. Anne R, 


Wilmington 


Nelson. Palrice M. 


Havelock 


Newman. James B., Jr. 


Greenville 


Noble, Douglas T. 


Kinslon 



Graduates 




64 Graduates 





(itM 



^ 



Seniors 



O'Neal. EveretteL. 


Pantego 


Overlon. Gary P. 


Ahoskie 


Parkinson. AlanS. 


Massena, iV. V 


Patterson. Carol A. 


Greenville 


Perry. Marie R. 


Kitty Hawk 


Pollard. M. Regina 


Dunn 


Purvis. Frieda W. 


Greenville 


Quinn. Wendy E. 


Washington. DC. 


Rabold.GailM. 


Newion 


Rawls, lullanR.. |r 


Greenville 


Robertson. Harold R. 


Littleton 


Royal. Mark A. 


Fayetteville 


Shah.Rajul V. 


Bombay. India 


Stanley, Cynthia S. 


Clarendon 


Stroud. ]oseph E., |r. 


Fuquay-Varina 


Taylor, fames F. 


Newton. N. / 


Tedder, Judith L, 


Greenville 


Tharp. Peter J. 


Greenville 


Thinakaran, Nachiapp 


inG. Greenville 


Thomas. Eric C. 


Wilson 


Vincell.John H . Ill 


Garner 


Vinson. Noma C. 


Snansboro 


Walker, Eddie L. 


Asheboro 


Will's. Michael M. 


Morehead City 


Willis. Tomianne 


Farmville 


Wilson. Sandra W. 


Greenville 


Wilson. StancilW. 


Greenville 


Yates. Royal 


Goldsboro 



Abene, Stephen G. 


Ayden 


Abrams, Martha L. 


Raleigh 


Adams. Constance 


Newport 


Adams. Darrell H. 


Merry Hill 


Adams. Diana L. 


Salisbury 


Adams.G. Randy 


Roxboro 


Adams. Kenneth C. 


Vadkmvil/e 


Akers. Beverly A. 


K'inston 


Akers, Bruce D. 


Kinston 


Allen. AvaT. 


Concord 


Allen. Irvin M 


Warrenton 


Allen, Jackie B. 


Lexington 


Allen. Maxter E., Jr. 


Ansonville 


Aman, Iris M. 


Dunn 


Anderson. Carol L. 


Tarboro 


Anderson. Jonell 


Aberdeen, Md. 


Anderson. Mary G. 


Greensboro 


Andres. Renee ]. 


Winston-Salem 


Andrews, Ruth E. 


SmithfieJd 



Ange, Patricia A 


Pantego 


Angel, David W. 


Greensboro 


Annarino. Will R. 


Asheville 


Anthony. Ronald W. 


Raleigh 


Applegate, |oseph I!. 


Greenville 


Arlin. Roxanne 


Gibsonia 


Armstrong. Connie L 


Nashville 


Arthur, Toby R. 


Trenton 


Ashby, Rebecca II 


Greenville 


Ashe. Raymond B. 


Williamston 


Ashley. |oan M. 


Roxboro 


Askew. Milton 11 111 


Veu Hern 


Austin, Dorcas D. 


Greenville 


Austin. William B 


Burlington 


Aydlett.Michele E 


Greenville 


Bagnall, Constance R 


Valley Stream, N. Y. 


Bailey, Beverlj ] 


Wiliiamston 


Bailey . ]ml\ K 


Greenville 


Bailey, Merrimon S. 


Greenville 


Bi mil, Ann E. 


Kings Mountain 


Baker. Sharon G 


Dallas 


Ball, |ane 


Madison, W. \'a 


Ballance, Bernice | 


Morehead 


Ballentine, Martha | 


Charlotte 


Banks. Eddie M 


Trenton 


Banks, Melva I. 


( ireenville 


Bannermon, |oan E 


Kinston 


Barbee, Deborah |, 


Greenville 


Barl .William C )r. 


Greenville 


Barber, Catherine F. 


Churlotte 


Barbour. Roberl D 


Fayetteville 


Bardill. Carolyn 11 


Durham 


Bardill, Harold W |i 


Jacksonville 


Baref .Richard R 


Greensboro 


Barnes, AnitaP 


Severn 


Barnes, Brenda K. 


Greenville 


Barnes. Debra A. 


Clayton 


Barnes. |oseph E, 


Leivislon 


Barnes. Roberl 15 |r 


Roanoke Rapids 


Barrick, Dennis M, 


Stiver Spring. Md. 


Barrenline. Clarence M. St. Pauls 


Barrington. Debra 


Greenville 


Barrington, Sylvia G 


Raleigh 


Barrow, Susan L. 


Ruleigh 


Bashford, Nanc\ | 


Raleigh 


Bass. Ann M. 


Raleigh 


Bass, Brenda A. 


Nashville 


Bass. DonC. 


Newton Grove 


Bass. Joan E. 


Raleigh 


Bass. William T. 


F.ifenton 


Battle, Nan L. 


Rocky Mount 


Bayer. Sheryl \ 


Bloomingdale, N /. 


Beam, David B. 


Raleigh 


Bean, Carrie L. 


Kunnapolis 


Beaver, |anvier E. 


Waynesboro, Pa. 


Becker, |effR 


Albemarle 





Beddingfield. Jennj C 


Wilson 


Bell. A. Carl 


New Bern 


Bell,M,ir\ K. 


Rocky Mount 


Bender, John H., Ill 


Pollocksviiie 


Bengtson, Frances A, 


Lumberton 


Bennett, Doris E. 


Liilington 


Bennett. Edward |. 


Greenville 


Bennetl. Sharyn Y 


1 lin elm k 


Benson, Douglas M. 


.Angler 


Bennett. Marcia G, 


Greensboro 


Bells. Meredith 1) 


MiJford, Del 


Biddell. Ruth C. 


Luurinburg 


Binkley. Ronald B. 


Miami, Fla 


Black, Ernest C, 


Charlotte 


Black, Roger M. 


Whiteville 


Blackarei. Barry L. 


Burlington 


Blackwelder, Harold L 


Concord 


BUll kwelclel 1 .inil.i \ 


Greenville 


Blackwelder. Sara G 


Hillsborough 


Bland, Willie Sue 


Veu Bei n 


Blowsky. Garj A 


Mornstou n, .V / 


Bodenhamer. William 1 


. Ill Jacksonville 


Bogue. Bell} A 


Fremont 


Boles.'Sadie D, 


Walnut Cme 


Bonner. Angela S 


High Point 


Bonner, William R ,Jr 


Edward 


Bost, Deborah G. 


k'unnapolis 


Boubnighl, |oyce A 


Washington. D C 


Bowers, Ronald ] 


Jacksonville 


Bowles. William E 


Crewe. Va. 


Boys. Roberl 


Greenville 


Brame. [effrej W 


Burlington 


Brame, Nfancj 1 ) 


Clemmons 


Brantley. Barbara I 


flock} Mount 


Brett, Sll/elle R 


Como 


Bretting, Michael M 


Palos Verdes, Cat. 


Brickhouse, Rita 1- 


Colombia 


Brinkley, Moral.. 


Rutherfordton 


Bnnn, Harriett L. 


Rock} Mount 


Britt, Nanc> B, 


Lumberton 


Brock. Brantley A. 


Durham 


Brock. Kathy L. 


Tarboro 


Brock. Sandra E. 


Greenvdle 


Broughton, Durwood I, 


Rock}' Mount 


Brooks. E. Trace} 


Greenwich. Conn 


Brown. Carol |. 


Liilington 


Brown. Gloria |. 


Smithfield 


Brown. Jean T. 


Jacksonville 


Brown. Judith A 


Selma 


Broun. Nancy N 


Greenville 


Brown. Ralph A. 


Greenville 


Brown. Rebecca ). 


Kunnapo/is 


Brown. Roma K 


Williamslon 


Brown, Ronnv G. 


Selma 


Bruce, Kerrj L, 


hlavelock 


Brulon. [asper B 


Thnmasvdle 



Seniors 67 



Bryant, Joan R. 


Charlotte 


Buchanan, George A. 


Kinston 


Buchholz, [ohnF.,Jr. 


Southern Ptnes 


Buckley. Joseph L. 


Greenville 


Bullock, Peggy 1 


Wdliumston 


Bunch, Michael 1, 


flelvidere 


Bunn. Jimmy D. 


Tarborn 


Bunn, Richard A. 


Rocky Mount 


Burke, Gregory D. 


Winston-Salem 


Brukhead. Mary E. 


Fayetteville 


Burnette, Robin L. 


Greenville 


Burns. Karen S. 


Newark. N. V. 


Burroughs. Arlene VV. 


Havelock 


Burrow. Mildred L, 


King 


Butler, Trudy A 


Annapolis. Md 


Byrd, Martha C. 


Raleigh 


Byrer, Frederick S. Ch 


arles Town. W. Va. 


Byrum. Betly N, 


Edenlon 


Calhoun. Brenda M. 


Rocky Mount 


Campbell. Geraldine M 


Newport 


Campbell. Rhonda S. 


Sun ford 


Campbell, Susan D. 


Greensboro 


Campbell, Thomas J. 


Sanford 


Canady. Harrietle A. 


Richiands 


Capshaw. Sarah L. 


Warminister, Pa. 


Cardwell, Deborah S. 


Madison 


Carriker, Cynthia S. 


Charlotte 


Carroll. Garthie A. 


Autryville 


Carson. Debra J. 


Greenvilie 


Carson, Jerry A. 


Robersonville 


Carson. Mary S. 


Lillington 


Carter. Steven |. 


Greenville 


Cash, Marjorie A. 


Oxford 


Castevens. Charles M. 


Greenville 


Caudill. Alaska R. 


Havelock 


Caulton, Kevin W 


W Trenton, N. /. 


Cayton. Sandra M. 


Greenville 


Chadwick. Mary R. 


Norfolk. Va 


Chadwick, Key T. 


Struils 


Chadwick, Marilyn W. 


Smithfield 


Chambers. Art 


Seven Springs 


Chambers, Harvey M. 


Kinston 


Chapman. Kalhryn C. 


Rocky Mount 


Chapped, John E. 


Richmond. Va. 


Cherry. Mildred G. 


Whitakers 


Chick. Janet L. 


Silver Spring. Aid 


Claiborne, Janet M. 


( Irernsboro 


Clark. Carmen P. 


Arlington. Va 


Clark, Frieda A. 


Cary 


Clark, Jerry W. 


Greenville 


Clark. Robert D. 


Reidsvilie 


Claybrook. Cheryl L. 


Ayden 


Clayton, Susan C. 


Roxboro 


Clopton. Martha K 


Henderson 


Cobb, Peggy A. 


Farmville 


Coble. Ray M. 


Snow Camp 




68 Seniors 




Coggins. Carol S 
Cole. Max T. 
Cole. Patricia D 
Cole. Susan T. 
Coleman. Barbara E. 
Collier. DoraB. 
Cook. Elizabeth H 

Cook. George G. 
Cook. Harriet E. 
Cook. Simon H. 
Cooley. Jan E. 
Cooper. |an J. 
Cope. Ronald E. 
Corbetl. Janice E. 

Corbett. Sandra C. 
Corriler, Randall A. 
Covington. |amesT.. )r. 
Cox, Guy O.. Jr. 
Crandall. Lela K. 
Crawley, Michael E, 
Creech, Minx a C 



Sanford. N. C. 

Eagle Springs 

Sunlord 

Whiteville 

Neptune, N. /. 

Williumston 

Luke Wuccamuiv 



Creech, Patricia O. 
Creech. Teresa |. 
Cromartie. Mary B 
Crooke. |anel E. 
Crosby. Johnnie [. 
Crotts, Deborah B. 
Crumley . Peter H. 

Culbreth, Barbara A. 
Cullifer, Christopher 
Cummings. Alta A. 
Cunningham. Gerald A. 
Curlee, R |ud> 
Cults. Karen B 
Culls. VickiM. 

Dail, Evelyn B 
Daly, Thomas F. 

Dameron. Beverly R 
Daughtry, K. |an 
Daughtry. Patricia A. 
Davenport. Frances E. 
Davies. Ralph D. 

Davis. Aleene J. 
Davis. Beth S. 
Davis. ]ames H. 
Davis, Karen L. 
Davis. Kenneth A. 
Davis, Lj nn E, 
Davis. Manuel. 

Davis, Pamela | 
Davis, Paula M. 
Davis, Samuel K. 
Davis, Stephen W. 
Davis, Susan B. 
Dawes. Karen R 
Day, Marilyn L. 



Greenville 

Wilson 

Rocky Mount 

Woures\ illr 

Burlington 

Greenville 

Greenville 

Go/dsboro 
Salisbun 

Winston-Salem 

Wilson 

Robersonville 

Littleton 

Pine Level 

Kinston 

Smithfield 

Chopei Hill 

.Monroe 

Koseillsko. Miss 

/amesiovvn 
Morehead Cm 

Greem ijle 

Charlotte 
Greensboro 

Greensboro 

Norwood 

Dothan, Ala. 

Rocky .Mount 

Dunn 

Durham 

Burlington 

Asheboro 

Coldsboro 

Durhuni 

/acksonville 

Elizabeth Cit\ 

Virginia Beach, Va 

High Point 

Calj /iso 

Wilson 

Morehead Cit\ 

Cerro Gordo 

Roi k) Mount 

/amesville 

Eden ton 

Alexandria, Va. 

Wilmington 

Roi k) Mi unl 

Roxboro 



Seniors 69 



DeBerry, Ginger C 
DeBerry, Steven II 
Dees, Mary M. 
Deese, |ean I) 
Dennis, Edna P. 
Denny, K Elaine 
Denton, Thomas N 



•lamar, Dennis W, 
impsey, |oanna 1 1 
irrick, E, Leo, III 
iwar, Theresa E 

llon.Chari I) 

xon, Shern S 



Dolacky, Deborah A 
Dodd, DebraA 
Dollar, Kenneth L 
Dowd, |ud\ I. 
Dowd.KathvT. 



Dowty, I, a* 
Dudlev, Je 



rem 
mD. 



udley.SandraL 
uni an, Stephen T. 
unn Edward G. 
unn, Ernest C. 
unn. James A., Jr. 
unning. Melissa M 
uPree, Deborah I, 

agan. Margaret D. 
ason.Tro\ E. 
astwood, |oanne II 
astwood, Norm, in E 
dmonds, Leon I) 
dmondson, Stuarl V 1 



Ed 



lis. |ames O.. 11 
Edwards, Michael D. 
Edwards, Penny L. 
Edwards, Roger II 
Elliott, Elizabeth A. 
Kills. Man F 
Knnis, Wa\ nr I, 



Ellis. Sue E. 
Epley. Timothy A 
Ervin, HaroldM 
Estes, Waltei R 
Eure, Beverl; | 
Eure, Donna * *. 
Eure. Joseph L.. ]i 

, Joseph L 
, Rebecca E. 
Eutsler, Stuarl K. 
Faber. Al 
Faddis, |ean A 
Failing. Barbara/ 
Fairlev. Thomas 



Roanoke Rapids 

Conway 

Goldsboro 

Pugelanii. S. C. 

Bethel 

Concord 

Greenville 

Orienla) 

Jamesville 

Ashe born 

Bethel 

Greensboro 

Winston-Salem 

Pittsboro 

Havelock 

Raleigh 
Greenville 

While Oak 

Edenlon 

Beau fori 

Scotland Neck 

Washington 
Greenville 

Greenville 

New Bern 

Kenansville 

Durhum 

Angler 

Jacksonville 

LuGrange 
Wintervilie 

Greenville 

l\ urrenlon 

Griflon 

Granile Fulls 

Greenville 

Greenville 

Wilson 

Roseboro 

Hialeah. Fla. 

Oxon Hill.Md 

Raleigh 

Fuquu\ -V'anna 

Ashel ille 

Greenville 

Bay Shore, N. V. 

Roduco 

Greensboro 

Fure 

Galesviiie 

Hertford 

k'inslon 

Haledon, N. J. 

Winslon-Salem 

Wilmington 

Luunnburg 




70 Seniors 




Faison, Pamela V 
Fallon. Palricia D 
Faulk, Marcia |, 
Faulkner, Pamela E 
Ferguson, Edwin, G 
Ferguson, Lesley A 
Ferrell. Kathj A. 

Fisher, Sandra R 
Fischesser. Mike 
Filch, |anice M. 
Fitzgerald, Linda S. 
Fitzsimmons, Dora A. 
Flanary, Philip D 
Flowers, Richard C 

Floyd, Lawrence N. 
Fogleman, Joel L 
Ford. Patricia K 
Forrest, |ohn E. 
Foster. |ohn R. 
Foster, Joyce B. 
Foster, Mary G. 

Foster, Nancy Z. 
Foster. Richard H. 
Fountain, Patricia L. 
Fraser. Gloria ). 
Franz, Thomas H. 
Frazelle. Nancy B. 
Frazier, Thomas H. 

Freeman. Richard D 
Freeze, Carol A. 
Frodella. Judy A 
Fryar. William D.. Jr. 
Frye. Martha L. 
Fulcher. Ginger L. 
Fuller, Gad I, 

Fuller. |ames K. 
Fulp, Martha | 
Futrell, lames W. 
Futrell, Sarah B. 
Galloway, Frances H, 
Galloway, ]im R. 
Gardner, )anel G. 

Garner, Suzanne K 
Garrett, Rick 
Gates, Donna K. 
Gibson, Elizabeth A. 
Gibson, |oseph R. 
Giesentanner, Debra 
Gilliam, Rii I ! A 

Gillikin. Jesse E Ji 
Glasson, Linda C. 
Glosson. Dally L. 
Godwin. Charles B. 
Godwin, James E. 
Godwin. Mar) li 
Goettman, Diana 



Littleton 
Fayetteville 

Sanford 

Albemarle 

Suffolk, Va. 

New Bern 

Gerner 

New Bern 

Winston-Sulem 

Burlington 

Wilson 

Wilmington 

Fayetteville 

Allunlic Beuch 

Middle burs 
Gibsonville 
Chapel Hill 

\ Lid I'llNI n 

Winston-Saiem 

Richmond. V'a. 

Kinslon 

Greenville 

Mocksvdle 

Richlands 

ChopelHill 

Washington 

Jacksonville 

Maple Hill 

Wilson 

Rockville. Md. 

Merrill Island. Fla. 

Greenville 

Wilmington 

Morehead City 

Garner 

Pinetops 

Walnut Cove 

Bethel 

Brunchville. Va 

Cre swell 

Greenville 

Warrenton 

Greensboro 

Richmond, Va 

Hickory 

Laurinburg 

Franklin. Va 

Asheville 

Fayetteville 

Morehead City 

Fa) ettei ille 

Siier Cit; 

Rocky Mount 

Elm City 

Elizabeth Cit) 

Greensboro 



Gooding, Mary K. 
Goodling, Richard T 
Gould, Walter T., Jr, 
Grant, Laura C. 
Gravlee, Lynne H. 
Gray, Clifton D 
Gray, Robert A., Jr. 

Greene, Larry D. 
Greenway. Vicky L. 
Greiner. Karen L. 
Griffon. Christopher 
Griffin, lames W., |r 
Griffin. Reggie S 
Griffin, Robert G. 

Griffith. Susan R. 
Grimes, Rose M. 
Grochmal, Philip A 
Grose. Donna |. 
Guenther. Carol M. 
Gunderson, Jons N. 
Guptill, Richard | 

Gurganus, Margaret C. 
Gutierrez, |oseph A., |r. 
Haithcote, Nancy K 
Hall.ClydeS. 
Halsey, Cynthia L. 
Halyburton, |ennifer 
Ham. Dennis M. 

Hamshar, Alice D, 
Hancock, Joel G. 
Handsel. M. Lee 
Haney. Phyllis L. 
Hardee, Daphne A 
Hardman, Ray H. 
Harkins, Sophia S. 

Harland, Sally L. 
Harrell.DociaV. 
Harrill.KalhrynM. 

Harris. Andrew |. 
Harris. Deborah I.. 



U 



Ha 



. Ger< 



Harris. Phil A. 



terville 

Durhum 

Greenville 

Beau fori 

(.'/-rem die 

Kinston 

Lillington 

Kure 
Henderson 
Jacksonville 
Hnok\ Mount 
Williamston 
Edenton 
Washington 

Greenville 

Rocky Mount 

Virginia Beach. Va. 

Marion 

Pomonu. N /. 

Winston-Salem 

New Bern 

Wushmglon 

Winston-Salem 

Greenville 

Hickory 

Jacksonville 

Hamlet 

Snow Hill 

Durham 

Harkers Island 

Vass 

Autryville 

Elizabethtoivn 

Roanoke, Va. 

Asheville 

Norfolk, Va 

Gatesville 

Rockingham 

Macon 

Rock>' Mount 

Fayetteville 

Littleton 



Harris, Richard D . |r. 


Farmville 


Harris, Tyler B. 


Greenville 


Harrison, Darrell L. 


H 11),.' Enrest 


Harrison, Emily H. 


Snoiv Hill 


[ larrlsnn. Pegg\ I. 


Garner 


Hartness. Thomas S. 


Rocky Mount 


Haskett, Karen |. 


Hertford 



Hathaway, Kandice D. 

Hauhenreiser. Joan 
Hawkins. Betsy A. 
Hawkins. Jacqueline 
Hawley, Katie A. 
Hawley. Thomas E., Jr. 
Hayes, Christopher D. 



Asheboro 

Charlotte 

Garner 

Greenville 

Lucama 

Dunn 

Sunford 





4i£U» 




i.i) 




Hayes, |imm\ 1! 


Rumflerntln 


Heath, Patti | 


Allentown. Pa 


Heidenreich, |an M. 


( Jreem ille 


Hemmerle, Richard 1, 


Rock) Mount 


Herring, Edu ard E . |i 


Durham 


Herring, Hannah W. 


Fayettevil/e 


Hester. Deborah | 


Hhzubelhloivn 


Hickman, Patricia A. 


Charlotte 


Higgins. |ames B 


Alexandria. Va. 


Hilbert, Sheila 1) 


Newport 


Hill, RobertM 


('irrt-n\ ille 


Hilliard, Ronald B. 


Macon 


Hilton, Elizabeth W 


U illiamston 


Hines, Samuel G, 


Goldsboro 


Hinton, Quen 


Kinsttm 


Hix, Cynthia E. 


Charlotte 


Hobbs, |oe B, 


Easton 


Hobby. Edward 0. 


Durhum 


Hobgood. Karl W 


Wilson 


Hodges.RitaS 


Grimesland 


Hodson,Ka\ A 


Washington. D C 


Hoffman. |ohn H 


Holmdel, N. \ 


Hogue, Robin M 


Virginia Rt-ach. Va 


Hoinville, Susan 


Greenville 


Holcomb. Inglis G. 


Ml Airy 


Holden, BrendaF 


Supplj 


Holder, LasterB. 


Lillington 


Holley. Anita L. 


Colerain 


Hollidaj RandolphE 


Greenville 


Hollowell. Thomas L. 


Kinston 


Holt. Stephen B, 


Fitchburg. Mass 


Holton, Deborah A 


Cresw ell 


Hooker. Sharon 1. 


Concord 


Hopewell. |aneth H 


.Veil Bern 


Home. Deborah L 


Wilmington 


Home KatherineC 


Greenville 


Home. William II 


Fulls Church. Va 


Horton, Elizabeth C 


Rocky Mount 


House. Walter P 


Creeni ille 


Howard, GayleR. 


PmklliU 


Howard. Millard D 


Middlesex 


Howe. |ose|)h L . |r 


.Asheboro 


Howe, Patricia M. 


RaJeigh 


Howell, Kenneth W 


Apex 


Howell. Ruth B. 


Rocky Mount 


Hudgins. Robert E. 


1 ewisville 


Hudson. Virgil F. 


Greensboro 


Huffman. Anna K. 


Summerfiebi 


Hoggins. Margaret V. 


\.u Bl irn 


Hughes. Phyllis L 


Oxford 


Hunicutt, Martin S 


Clearwater, Flu 


Hunt. David M. 


Greenville 


Hurst. Lawrence R 


Fayettei ille 


Huse Scoll M 


Little Silver. .V / 


Hutchins, Jacqueline K 


Durham 


Ingram. DehorahS. 


Norlina 



Ivey. Penny '■■ 


Lumberton 


Jabinnski.llarn |..|r. 


Shallotte 


[ackson, Mary 11 M 


lunluin Lakes. N J 


[acobs, Deborah 1, 


GoJdsboro 


|acohs. George 1) 


Greenville 


Jafari, Jamshid 


Greenville 


[arvis, Judy E, 


New Bern 


[enkins.B Susan 


(Justc-nia 


Jenkins, Ronald W. 


Wheaton. Aid. 


Jenkins, Thomas L 


Rocky Mount 


Jenkins, Wanda | 


Wilson 


(ernigan, Kenneth] 


Dunn 


|ewell, George T 


Raleigh 


Johnson, Bari I. 


Franklmville 


lohnson, Becky M. 


Benson 


Johnson, Christiana R 


Kinslon 


lohnson. Franklin D., |r 


Greem ille 


Johnson, Lois | 


Clayton 


Johnson. Janel 1. 


Raleigh 


Johnson, Myra L. 


Warrenlon 


Johnson, Sandra K. 


Wake Fores! 


Johnson, Susan K 


Apex 


Johnson, Susie I.. 


Henderson 


Johnston, Margarel |. 


Concord 


[ones, Cynthia D. 


Spindale 


[ones, James R., II 


FarmviJJe 


[ones.JaniceM 


Buies Creek 


| ones, Thomas D. 


Rocky Mount 


[ones, William F 


Selma 


Ionian. |eifre\ 11 


Alnoresloun, N. /. 


[oyner, Alvin 


Creenvilh 


joyner, Donald C. 


Henderson 


Kale, Samuel B 


Morehead City 


Karr, Debra [. 


Albany, Ga 


Kassman, Janice F. 


llhacu. N. V. 


Keel. Joseph G. 


Ahoskie 


Keichline. Thomas D. 


Temple Hills. Md 


Kelly, Patricia E. 


Elizabeth City 


Kelly. Sheila J. 


Dubuque, la 


Kendrick, Calvin 1, 


Burlington 


Kenned) . Albert G. 


Wilmington, Del 


Kennington, Kathy P. 


Chester, V'a. 


Kepley, William K 


Salisbury 


Kesler, Charles W. 


Greenville 


King, Katherine II. 


Greenville 


Konrady, Ronald E 


F.'gg Hurbor, N. /. 


Krieger. Karen M. 


Fuvetteville 


Kirk.F.miK R. 


Salisbury 


Koonce. Debbie D. 


Raeford 


Koonce, Junius II 


Tarboro 


Kornegay . Katherin G. 


Alt. Olive 


Kornegay, William E, 


Rocky AJount 


Krouse. Charles W, 


Alorehead City 


Lacks, Clifton F . |r, 


Richmond, Va 


Lambeth, Susan 11 


Trinity 


Lancaster Joseph 1) 


Rocky Mount 




74 Seniors 




Lancaster. Ronald D 


Greenville 


Langlej . Sandra L. 


Erie, Pa. 


Laney, Michael N. 


Raleigh 


Langley. Jennifer H. 


Greenville 


Lanier. David C. 


Wilmington 


Lassiler. Linda V. 


Selma 


LaRussa, David C, 


/ nlie/il i ',unn 


Lashle\ . ]ames W. 


l Ireenshorn 


Latino. Giovanna 


Greenville 


Latour. Richard F. 


Greenville 


Lean. Larr\ P 


Fayetlev ille 


Lee. |ames M. 


SmithfieJd 


I ,Joj E. 


Arapahoe 


Lee. Michael |. 


Dunn 


Lee. Michael S. 


Go/dsboro 


Lee. Katrina W. 


Salisbury 


Lee. Lena M. 


Auiander 


Lefler.Patrii e I) 


Winterville 


Lehman. Marie P. 


Delanco, \ | 


Lemons. Bets\ A 


Winston-Salem 


LePors, Michael R 


Fayetteville 


Lewis, Lois A. 


Raleigh 


Lewis. Barbara C. 


Windsor 


Lewis. Jimmie 


Brooklyn, N "i 


Lilley. Cynthia J. 


Williamston 


Lilley, William C. 


Williamston 


Linville. Cheryl T. 


Farmville 


Linville. Raymond N. 


Winston-Salem 


Little. Thomas G.. Jr. 


Greenville 


Lloyd, Charles G. 


Durhum 


Lockee. Charles R 


Lenoir 


Long, Cathy ] 


Virginia Beach, Va 


Long, Marian F. 


Elizabeth City 


Lovelace, Charlie E. 


Hurt, Vu 


Lovett, Cindy L. 


Warren. Ohio 


Lowry. Pamela S. 


Winston-Salem 


Lucas. Robert V. 


Raleigh 


Lynch. Donna A. 


Winston-Salem 


MacDonald. )ames R. 


Hickory 


MacDonald, John B. 


Greensboro 


Machen. George H 


High Point 


Mackie. Fred M. 


Yadkinville 


Macon. Sophia S. 


Newport News, Va. 


Malone, Larry D. 


Raleigh 


Malloch, Jo A. 


Gastonia 


Mann. Marilyn S. Ne 


vv Smyrna Bch.. Flu 


Mann, Ruth F 


Pantegn 


Mann. Stephanie A. 


Charlotte 


Mann. Terry L. 


Whiteville 


Mann. Waller B , Jr 


Car) 


Manning, Norma E 


Bethel 


Manson, Ronald V. 


Havelock 


Maron, Thomas E, 


Greem ille 


Marsh, Glenda R 


Fayette\ ille 


Marshall, Howard J, 


Currie 


Marshall, Richard A 


Hampton, Vu 



Martin, Benjamin [., |r 


Hope Mills 


Marlin. |oanne 


Conway 


Marlin. Linda G. 


Fayetteville 


Mason. Barbara E, 


Raleigh 


Massengill, Dorie M. 


Fayettevilie 


Masses , Rose W 


Greenville 


Maughan, Elizabeth A, 


Raleigh 


Mayo, Fred 


Selma 


McCormick, Cornelia A 


Fairmont 


McCown, Robert W. 


Roanoke, Va. 


McCue, Sandra A. 


Pitman, N. J. 


McDaniel, E. Christianna 


Snow Hill 


McDilda. Kenneth L. 


Emporia, Va. 


McGhee, Muriel 1. 


Greenville 


McGinnis. Melody A. 


Kannapoiis 


McGowan. Ellen L 


Greenville 


McGram, Eileen 


Westbury. N. V. 


McKenzie, Sylvia ]. 


Fayelle\ llle 


McLawhon. Rhonda R. 


Wilmington 


McLawhorn, I,\ nne A. 


Kinston 


McLean, |udithK 


Laurinburg 


McLeod, Kalhy E, 


Durham 


McMahan. Patricia L. 


Wilmington 


McMahon. Richard A. 


Vienna. Va. 


McMichael. Lynda E. 


IV'ingute 


McMillan. Laura A 


Graham 


McRae, Doris | 


Fayetteville 


Meads, Joyce J. 


Elizabeth City 


Medlin, [onsieL. 


Kinston 


Mercer, Millard 1) 


Lucama 


Messer, William R 


Clearwater. Fla. 


Metz, Linda M. 


Gary 


Mickey, Sarah E. 


Lancaster. Pa. 


Miller, Gerald W. 


Greenville 


Miller. William D. 


Dunn 


Millhiser, Tommy R. 


Roxboro 


Mills. Craig K. 


Richmond. Va 


Mitchell. |aneF. 


Greenville 


Mitchell. Linda D, 


Pittsboro 


Mitchell. Paul C. 


Greenville 


Mitchell, Richards. 


Durham 


Mitchener. Mary A. 


Concord 


Mizell, SonyaO, 


Plymouth 


Mobley, Alan L. 


IVilliumslon 


Monday, Greg); S. 


Vienna. Va. 


Monson. Charles B. 


McLean. Va. 


Montague. Samuel H. 


Goldsboro 


Moody. Marilyn F. 


Winston-Saiem 


Moody, Sybil W, 


Raleigh 


Moo] e. ( leorge E. . |l 


Rocky. Mount 


Moore. Karen I, 


Lucama 


Moore. Kalhy | 


Charlotte 


Moore. Kenneth [) . |r 


Lexington. Va. 


Moore. ShannaL. 


Franklinton 


Moore, Stephen P, 


Reidsvil/e 


Moore. Teresa | 


Charlotte 




£M? 













Moore. Wanda E. 


Macclesfield 


Morgan, Linda C. 


Ellerbe 


Morgan, Nancy | 


Asheboro 


Morris. Laura | 


Charlotte 


Morris. Lucy S. 


Miami, Flu 


Morrow, Thomas L. 


Greensboro 


Morion, Albert F., Jr. 


New Bern 


Muegge, Margaret 


( Ireenville 


Mumford, Hal D. 


Greem ille 


Murphy. |arvis R 


Griflon 


Musgrave, |ohn N. 


Goldsboro 


Myles, DaveM. 


Fairfax, V'u 


Myrick, Michael D. 


Goldsboro 


Nail, Judy M. 


Plymouth 


Narron. |ohn A. 


Goldsboro 


Narron, |nhn\Y 


Wendell 


.Villon. Marcia I' 


k'nightdu/e 


Naylor, Gary L. 


Greenville 


Neal, Susan W. 


Charlotte 


Newsome, Carolv n A 


Wilson 


Newton, Doris L. 


Hertford 


Nichols, DeborahL 


Norwalk. Conn. 


Nienstedt, |ames K . |r, 


Morehead City 


Nock. Aim R 


Pocomoke. Aid 


Norfleet, Patricia A 


Pantego 


Northcutt. Janice E. 


Cory 


Nowell. Tummy T. 


Henderson 


Noyes, Kathleen K 


Marion 


O'Brien. Michael | 


Springfield, V'u 


O'Neal, Kathy I. 


Luuisburg 


O'Neal, Margaret A 


Stumpy Point 


( I 'Neal. Melvin 


Wilson 


Orr. Shirlene D 


Dover 


Outlaw. William 1! 


k'inston 


Owens. Bobby A. 


Hillsborough 


Owens, Deborah ] 


Greenville 


Owens, M. Kathryn 


Fountain 


Owens, Teresa A. 


Garner 


Overby. Herman W. 


Branchville. V'u 


Ozment. Timothy H 


Greensboro 


Padgett. Charles E. 


Greenville 


Page. Earl W. 


Durham 


Page. Pamela K. 


Fayetteville 


Palmer. John R 


Charlotte 


Parker. Annice D. 


Washington 


Parker, Ruth G 


Ahoskie 


Parnell, Amelia A 


Parkton 


Parnsh. Phillip I. 


Durham 


Pan ish, Phyllis P. 


Smithfield 


Parrott, Billj R 


Kinslon 


Pair. |uneP. 


Beuuford 


Patterson, Thomas E. 


Durhum 


Paylor, Cheryl F. 


Kinsion 


Payne, Patsy L. 


Wanchese 


Peacock, Ivan V 


Jacksonville 


Pearce.MaryE. 


Durham 



Pearson, Beth 1. 


Pitman, N. /. 


Peebles, Linda A. 


Fayettev iJJe 


Peeter, Pamela | 


Granite Quarry 


Pegram, Beverly A 


Gastonia 


Penfiled, Sandra W 


Asheboro 


Pennington, Betty A. 


Huleigh 


Perkins, Vicki L. 


Goldsboro 


Perry, William E. 


Kinston 


Perrvman. Thomas R 


Winston-Salem 


Peterson, Donna S. 


Arapuhoe 


Peterson. James \ 


Clinton 


Peterson. William P 


r. Clinton 


Phelps, Debra G 


Creenville 


Phelps, Ellen | 


Raleigh 


Phillips, Carolyn C. 


Goldsboro 


Phillips, Roberl 1) 


Fayetteville 


Phipps, William W, 


Tabor City 


Pickard. Wanda V 


Durham 


Pickens, Deborah A. 


Charlotte 


Pierce, Cynthia E 


Princeton 


Pierce, T. R. 


Creenville 


Pierpoint, Virginia P. 


Henderson 


Pike, DouglasW. 


Littleton 


Pitt.MichaelH 


Rocky Mount 


Pittman, Barbara | 


Scotland Neck 


Pittman, Deborah F. 


Hookerton 


Pitlman, Roberl D. 


Greenville 


Pittman, Robert XI 


Rocky Mount 


Pitts, John F 


Charlottesville, Va, 


Pollard, Rachael A. 


New Bern 


Powell, Alfres.W. 


Rounoke Rapids 


Powell, Richard W. 


Newport News, Va. 


Prii e, Dewej W 


Brown Summit 


Price, TonaM, 


Goidsboro 


Prince, Robert G„ [r. 


Rocky Mount 




Creenville 


Purcell, Samuel M 


Salisbury 


Quash. Karl 1. 


Alexandria. Va. 


Quick, Roy A. 


Hamlet 


Rains. LindaS, 


Princeton 


Rambo, SarahK 


Charlotte 


Ramsey. Ronald W. 


Crouse 


Ramsey, Wanda M 


Charlotte 


Ratliff, Robert W. 


Winston-Salem 


Ray, Larry C. 


Greenville 


Reavis, David C, 


Henderson 


Redding, Kath\ M 


Concord 


Redding, Thomas M. 


Lewisville 


Reimann, Alan 1) 


Sur Hills. N ]. 


Renfrow. Sharon K, 


Kenlv 


Rettgers, Bonnie | 


Alexandria, Va. 


Revelle, Connie M. 


Warsoiv 


Rice, Christopher M. 


Winston-Salem 


Rue, LindaL 


Bellevue. Wash 


Rii hards, C Thomas 


Richmond. Va. 


Richey. Sarah F 


Westfield, N 1 




78 Seniors 




Ripper. Edward H. 


Arlington, V'u 


Rippy. Robert S. 


Lion 


Robbins, Linda S. 


Halifax 


Roberson. Nan E. 


Robersonville 


Roberson, Roosevelt 


Greenville 


Roberson, William VV. 


Robersonville 


Robertson. PauletteL. 


Proctorville 


Robinson, Cathj D 


Gastoma 


Robinson. Katherine E. 


Garysburg 


Robinson. Sharon D. 


Charlotte 


Rockwell. Keith R. 


Greenville 


Rogers. Robin R 


Greenville 


Rogerson. Nancy D. 


Kenly 


Ronzo. Elizabeth M. 


Midway Park 


Rook.KalhyT. 


Bethel 


Rose. Alice S. 


Belhaven 


Roundtree. Edna R. 


Uinterville 


Rountree, Wilton G. 


Turboro 


Rouse. Beverly S. 


Jacksonville 


Rouse, IrisH, 


Seven Sprjngs 


Rouse. Linda A. 


Belhaven 


Rowell, Ronnie E, 


Raleigh 


Ruffin. Michael F 


Greenville 


Sanders. Brenda L. 


Youngsville 


Sanders. Emily D. 


Four Oaks 


Satlervvhile. Teresa G. 


Henderson 


Sauls. Barbara A. 


Goldsboro 


Saunders, Frank \\ '.. |r 


Greenville 


Saunders. Kirk Y 


Kailua, Hawaii 


Saunders, Linda R. 


Raleigh 


S.iunil.'i s Sue \\ 


Franklinville 


Sawyer, Kenneth R, 


Plymouth 


Sawyer. Theodore Fb. |r 


Burlington 


Saver. Cynthia A. 


Bethesdo, Md. 


Senator. David D 


Arlington. Va 


Schmidt. Andrew H. 


Old Tappan. N J 


Scott. David VV. 


Morganlon 


Scronce. ]eanne |. 


Newton 


Sealey. Linda ). 


Raleigh 


Self. David B 


Winston-Salem 


Sessions. Janet Y. 


Whiteville 


Sellers. Bonnie S. 


Whiteviile 


Settle, Willie L. 


Reidsville 


Sharp, Judj D. 


Raleigh 


Shearin. Harriet L. 


Rocky Mount 


Shearin, Steven A. 


Rock) Mount 


She.iron |oel U 


Greenville 


Shelton, MarjorieT. 


VVa/slonburg 


Shepherd. Francis D. 


Richmond. Va 


Shetterly. Jane 


Alexandria. Vo. 


Short. Dais\ D. 


Siler City 


Shuller, Carol 


Southporl 


Shumaker. Donald H. 


Merry Hill 


Sibley. Barbara R. 


Greenville 


Simmons, Cindy J. 


Goldsboro 


Simmnns. Larry D. 


(,'nllon 



Simonds, Stephen II 


RockviJIe. Md. 


Singletary, Gregory H 


U hllel Alt- 


Sitterson, Sue B. 


Robersnnville 


Sizemore. Joyce E. 


Germuntown 


Skinner. Margarel I. 


WiJJiamston 


Slaton, Joseph G. 


Monroeville, Pa 


Sloan, |oAnne 


Durham 


Smallwood. Shirlej [. 


Windsor 


Smith, James H . |r 


Dunn 


Smith, janeM 


Rocky Mount 


Smith. Jennifer L, 


Grifton 


Smith, Kenneth W. 


Beaufort 


Smith, Mary K, 


Clayton 


Smith, Ralph L, 


Kitty Hunk 


Smith, Ruby A. 


Kinslon 


Smith. Virginia L, 


Winston-Salem 


Smith. William B. 


McLeansville 


Snyder, Robert E. 


Burlington 


Solier, George A 


Alexandria, Va 


Soltys, Martha L. 


Midway Park 


Southern, Thomas L. 


Chapel Hill 


Speight, Jasper A. 


Greenville 


Speight, [ohnnj L. 


Greenville 


Speight. Vivian M. 


Wilson 


Squires. Donald W. 


Elizabethtown 


Stallings, Julie 1) 


Spencer 


Starling.Fred A 


Greensboro 


Steed, Michael R. 


Trinity 


Steelman, JackS. 


Greenville 


Stein. Georgia A. 


Rocky Mount 


Stephens, Doris M, 


Cory 


Slocks. Donald A 


Hookerlon 


Stoner. Albert I, . Ill 


Mucon 


Stuhbs. Harry W., Ill 


Greenville 


Sturm. Vaughn E. 


Haveiock 


Styron. Anna G. 


Harkers Island 


Snllei n, Nancy A. 


/acksonville 


Suggs. Elizabeth K. 


Rocky Mount 


Sullivan, Daniel K. 


Burlington 


Sullivan, Robert M. 


Wilmington 


Summerell, Vernon G. 


Virginia Beach, Va. 


Swain. Irvin R . |r 


Kinston 


Swann. |effrey S. 


Greensboro 


Swann. Margaret S. 


Asheville 


Su .inner. M. Darlete 


Edenton 


Swanson. Deborah H. 


Rocky Mount 


Swayze, Charlotte E, 


Liiiington 


Swensson. Karen C. 


Chudds Ford. Pa. 


Swicegood. Jay A. 


Edenton 


Sykes, Tanya S. 


Rocky Mounl 


Tart. Frances S. 


Kinslon 


rayloe. HuldaM, 


Colerain 


Taylor. Arthur W., Ill 


Suffolk. Va. 


Taylor, Debra B. 


Farmvilie 


Taylor, Del K 


Goldsboro 


faylor, Elizabeth | 


Kinston 










Taylor, Harriette R 


Goldsboro 


Taylor. Kathy A. 


Burlington 


Taylor, Lou Anno 


Hookerton 


Taylor, M.irio E. 


Wilson 


Taylor, Marilyn S, 


Wilson 


Taylor, Roland K , |r. 


Kinston 


Taylor, Vicki S. 


Sivunsbnrn 


Terrell. L\ nne C. 


Yen' Bern 


Terrell, Steve S 


Hickory 


Thomas. Brenda F. 


Bunnlevel 


Thomas, |udv E 


Rock) Mount 


Thomas. Susan 1 ) 


High Point 


Thompson, Becky |. 


Rundlemon 


Thurman, Pamela ). 


Pennington, N j 


Tillery, |ohn 1! 


Halifax 


Timanus, Delia A 


Charlotte 


Tingle, [ulia C 


( Irlenlul 


Tipton, Freddie A 


Havelock 


Tippette, Burl T 


Enfield 


Tkach, Joseph A 


Midway Park 


Towe. [amesM 


Greem die 


Townsend, Charles \Y 


Greenville 


Townsend. I herald A, 


U hilei iile 


Townsend, Susan A 


Wallace 


Trawick, Charles W 


Burguiv 


Tripp. Laura E, 


Washington 


Tucker, Charles F 


Roanoke Rapids 


Tucker. DaleK 


Greenville, S C 


Turner, Susan M 


Scotch Plains. N / 


Tyner, Randolph A 


SI Puuls 


Urshel. Susan E 


Stoneville 


Van Wagner, Melis.i | 


Oakhurst, N / 


Varela. Samari 


Costa flicu. C A 


Vaughan, |oseph N 


Mur/reesboro 


Vereen, David M 


Greenville 


Verlinden, Gregory F 


Raleigh 


Vim mi, [anisN. 


Greenville 


Vinson. Thomas M 


Conway 


Vinson. Trudy | 


Clayton 


Voliva, Susan K. 


Columbia 


Volkman, Gilda E. 


Cherry Hill, .V / 


VonBartheld, |on C 


River Edge, N / 


Vroom.Bob 


Commack, X Y 


Vulgan. |oseph M 


Charlotte 


Wade, Nyra H. 


Kinston 


Walden, E. G. 


Greem die 


Waldron, Rosemary A 


Wbllellllo 


Walker. ], lr nes W. 


Macon 


Wall. Naomi II 


Kinston 


Wallace. Marian E. 


Washington 


Walter. |ounn L, 


Richmond. Va 


Ward. Teresa A 


Pink Hill 


Ward, Veronica 


Winterville 


Warren. Barbara A 


Newton Grove 


Warren. Mary K 


Slulesl Me 


Warwick. Peggy 


Fair Bluff 



W is, Donald 1) 


Raleigh 


Watkins.FredO., Ill 


Greenville 


Watson, [ewel K 


New Bern 


Walsun. Marj K 


Seven Springs 


Waynick. Martha S. 


( ireensboro 


Weaver, Marj E 


Kenly 


Webb, Donna L 


Wilson 


Webb, Elizabeth M, 


Pinetops 


Webb, Use 1 


Raleigh 


Weeks, Rebecca A 


Swansboro 


Weintraub, Edward 1. 


jOng Branch. N. /. 


Weirich.MikeJ, V 


rgima Beach, Va 


Wells, Donald A. 


Greenviiie 


Wells, lletB. 


Teachey 


Werdal. James A. 


Greenville 


Westmoreland, |ames R 


Stalest ille 


Whaley.AltaK 


BeulaviJie 


Whaley, William C 


Goldsboro 


Wharton, John II 


Reidsville 


Wheeler. Deborah L. 


Goldsboro 


Whichard, Carolyn L 


Bethel 


Whisnant, Diana L. 


Hickorj 


White, Laura L 


Adelphi, Md 


White, Mitchell E 


Greenville 


White, Peggs F, 


Hertford 


Whitehurst. Cathj S. 


Robersonvilie 


Whitehursl, Sharon R 


Charlotte 


Whitley, Beverlj S 


Greenville 


Whitley, Charles D 


Portsmouth, Va 


Whitley, land M. 


Rockj Mount 


Wike, Donald | 


J.eniswlle 


Wilkerson, Lawrence T. 


Virgilina, Va. 


Wilkinson. Henrietta II 


Scotland Neck 


Wilier, Lonnie E. 


Greenville 


Williams, Cynthia L. 


Raleigh 


Williams, David L. 


Groom die 


Williams, Donald B 


Kinslon 


Williams, Emerson R 


Snow Hill 


Williams, Ethel G. Rich 


ards-Gebaur, Mo. 


Williams, Gloria E 


Kinston 


Williams, |amesM 


Durham 


Williams. Nancy E. 


Ape.x 


Williams, Loujeanie 


Deep Run 


Williams, Roberl E 


Goldsboro 


Williams, Vicki |. 


Rock)' Mount 


Williford, Roberl 1. 


FarmvilJe 


Wilson. Kaj l ; 


Greenville 


Wilson, Nancy 1. 


Hoi k\ Mount 


Windley. Charles B 


Pinetown 


Winslow, |anice 1. 


Hertford 


Wong. Henry D. 


Midway Park 


Wood, Carol A 


Richlunds 


Win,,!. Deborah L. 


Fayetteville 


W 1 Deborah 1. 


Vienna. Va. 


Wood. George II 


Greenviiie 


Wood, Kenneth I. 


Charlotte 





Wood, Sheila J. 


Randlemun 


Wood ard, Anne T. 


Woodland 


Woodard, Calvin S. 


Severn 


Woodward, Jeffrey L. 


Alexandria, Va. 


Wolfe, Carol A. 


New Bern 


Woolard. Almela A. 


Washington 


Woolard, Janet P. 


Washington 


Woolard. Sharon L 


Washington 


Wooten, Joan 


Walstonburg 


Wray. Marsha L. 


Greensboro 


Wyatt, Leslie [. 


Goidsboro 


Wyks. Donald W. 


Wenovvuh, N. / 


Yelverlon. Harold D. 


Fremont 


Yardlej . leffrey M. 


Durham 


Yopp. Edward R 


Charlotte 


York. Cathy L. 


High Point 


Younl. Stephen B. 


Rockingham 


Zalewski, Christine M. 


Dickson City, Pa 


Zellon, Sylvia C, 


Greenville 



Juniors 




Ackert. Rebecca S. 


Havelock 


Adams, Kalhy G. 


Huleigh 


Adiele, Andy C. 


Nigeria. Africa 


Advincula. June A. 


Spring Lake 


Albea, Catherine S. 


Raleigh 


Allison, Gail M. 


Bridgeton, N. /. 


Alphin, Sharon G. 


Ml Olive 


Ambrose, Deborah K. 


Pinetown 


Andrews. Paul Milton 


Wilson 


Andrews, Willie L. 


Robersonville 


Anderson. Jenni 


Chantiily, Va 


Ange. Cynthis A. 


/amesville 


Angel, Phyllis K 


San ford 


Archer. Pamela F. 


Rounoke Rapids 


Arthur, Robert C. 


Yen H> f n 


Auman. Kalhr\ n A. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Aussant. Kin M. 


Wilson 


Averett, | Cynthia 


Greenville 


Avery. Carol L. 


Raleigh 


Awar. Samie A. 


Konnayel. Lebanon 


Aycock. Merry S 


Wilson 


Bailey. Daphne J. 


Williamston 


Bailey. Keith Q, 


Portsmouth. Va 


Bailey, Margaret J. 


Wake Forest 


Baker. Brooks P. 


Raleigh 


Baker, Frances S. 


Windsor 



/uniors 83 



Baker. Janel L. 


Chugnn Fulls, ( Ihio 


Baker, Sandra K. 


Calypso 


Baldwin. Barbara ] 


Durham 


Bales, Trudi A. 


Winston-Salem 


Bales, MollieM 


Winston-Salem 


Ballard, Doris A. 


7'arboro 


Ballard. Eva E 


Concord 


Banks. Hubert li. 


7'renton 


Barclay, Patrick |. 


Elizabeth City 


Barefoot, Roberl A, 


Fayette* ille 


Barfield, Marilyn K. 


Merry Hill 


Barnes, Debra M 


Spring Hope 


Ban, Hubert F. 


Kinston 


Barrett. Glends A 


Roanoke Rapids 


Basnight, Eleanor I). 


Camden 


Bass, RoyR, 


Edenton 


Bali helur, Karen 1. 


Rocky Mount 


Baysden, Sheila C 


Richlands 


Beaman, [ackie C. 


Furmville 


Beaman.Marj K, 


Snow Hill 


Bear, Belinda A 


Springfield. Va 


Beavers, Kathryn A 


Enfield 


Beckner, William II . II 


I York, Pa. 


Bedini, Leandra A. 


Washington, D. C. 


Beeson, Christopher S. 


Kennersville 


Bell.LesaS. 


Clinton 


Bell, Robbie S. 


Greenville 


Benbow, Kenneth M 


Whiteville 


Bender, William E 


Norlina 


Bennett, M, Elaine 


Liilington 


Benton, Douglas F, 


Eden 


Best, Olivia G 


Goldsboro 


Best, Reba A 


Rue bird 


Bickley, Gary S, 


Kinslon 


Billings. Sarah A. 


Lexington 


Bisplinghoff, Gail I„ 


Durhum 


Blust.Paul E. 


Greensboro 


Boggs, Sydna | 


S()nngfield. Vu. 


Bogue, Wanda I., 


F'remont 


Boham. Linda S 


/ackson 


Boiselle.Kathy 1), 


Fayettevil/e 


Bond. Ann K. 


llullund. Va. 


Bone. Glorias. 


Rocky Mount 


Bene. Troy L. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Borst. Janice K. 


Charlotte 


Boutilier, |anice K. 


Havertown. Pa. 


Bowe, Michael G. 


Tunis River. N /. 


Bowen. Carrie D. 


Windsor 


Bowen. Dehra S. 


Woodland 


Boyd. Rae A. 


New Bern 


Boykin, |. Raj 


Sharpsburg 


Bradley, Robert A. 


Winston-Salem 


Bradner, Sydnej M 


Chester. Va. 


Brammer, Harold I. 


Elon 


Brammer, 1 Inward I, 


Elon 


Brann, Eugenia * !. 


Snow Hill 




H4 juniors 




Brenner, Hollj A 
Bright, Martha A 
Briley, Cathj I) 
Briley, Judith C. 
Brim. |ohn R 
Brooks, fanice E. 



Br 



iks, Willi 



M. 



Broom. Hazel I. 
Brothers, Marilyn I) 
Broughton, Pamela S 
Brown, Carl E. 
Brown, Carol) n S, 
Broun. Henry C. Jr. 
Brown, Sarah E. 



(irrcm illr 

Ayden 

Reidsville 

Greenville 

Winston-Salem 

Winston-Salem 

Green\ ille 

Goldsboro 

Elizabeth Cit) 

Durham 

Durhum 

Goldsboro 

Goldsboro 

Hunlersulle 



Browning, Paula L. Durham 

Brumbeloe, Rebecca A. Farmville 
Br\ an, Kath) L. Virginia Beuch. Va. 

Bryan, Phyllis]. Rock} Mount 

Bryant, Kath) M, Sanford 

Buffaloe, Alice K Rocky Mount 

Bullock, David M Greenville 



Bunn, Nam ) C 
Burch, |oniP 
Burden, Wingate R.. 
Burnette, WilbertT 
Burroughs. ]anice I. 
Butler, |ames M.,]r 
Butler, Marsha M. 

Byerly, Eddie B 
Bynum, lack I. 
Byrne, Joel A, 
Campbell, Ann | 
Cannon, Gw\ nnu L. 
Carpenter, Marcus C. Ill 
Carr, Sharon I). 

Carr, William H.,Sr 
Carreh.LindaM 
Carrow. Ann 
Carson, Jacqueline L. 
Carter. IvyT. 
Carter, Peggy |. 
Caruthers, Carolyn K 

Caule) . Vernon 1, 
Cashion, |ackie < ). 
Casstevens, Denise C 
Cates. Tom W 
Cederberg, Donna M 
Chadwick, [efferj I. 
Chance, Larry D. 

Chen, Winston E. 
( '.tiesson, Larr) G. 
Childs, David S 
( Ihristenberrj . Julia I > 
Clapp, Debi a A 
Clare. Thomas M 
Clark, Calh\ M 



Spring Hope 

Henderson 

Annandaie, Va 

Pittsboro 

Charlotte 

Lew istan 

Clinton 

U inston-Salem 

Pinetops 

Rock) .Mount 

Durhum 

Penns Grove, \ / 

Durhum 

Wilson 

•VI turn i. Flu 
Penns Grove, N /. 
Penns Grove, V / 

Bethel 

\\ ,iILi,,- 

.\ngier 

Burlington 

Kinslon 

Sunford 

Vadkinville 

Selma 

Rock) Mount 

Silver Spring. Md. 

Robersonville 

Greenville 



Roper 

Wadesboro 

rarboro 

Siler Cm 

Stanford, Conn 

Green\ ilh- 



Clark, Elaine A. 




Kinslnn 


Clark, Vickj G. 




Greenville 


Clemens, Paula | 




Garner 


Cobb. Constance N. 


W 


nston-Salem 


Cobb.Patricia 1) 




Wilson 


Coble, Rebecca \ 


Ale 


xundna. Vu. 


Cofer, Richard S . Ill 




G-eenviJJe 


Cohen, Fred B 




Raleigh 


Coker, Claire L. 




Benson 


Collins, Belts E. 




Louisburg 


Collins, |ennj W 




FayetteviJJe 


Collins, Kenneth G 




Poilocksville 


Collins. Marie M, 


Virgin 


a Beach. V'a. 


Comer.L, Kathi 




Carthage 


Constant. Catherine A 




Veil Bt-'l n 


Conyers, Edith I 1 




FranMinton 


Cooper. Patricia IS 


W. ' 


renlon. N. J. 


Cooper, Thomas C . |i 




Windsor 


Costin.Gail 




Warsaw 


Covert, Jon B. 




Vrivpoi f 


Cox. Carol I. 




Burlington 


Cox, Deborahs. 




Sunford 


Cragg, Patricia R 


Salisbury, \Ul 


Craig, Terrj S 




Gastoma 


Crandall. Larr> E. 




Plymouth 


I Irawford, Cathy S. 




( ,'nrrn lilt' 


Creech. Willie R 




Selma 


Cribb, Suzanne M. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Crissman, Dorothy E. 




Broadwuy 


Crocker. Sylvia Z. 




Selma 


Crone, Douglas A.. |r. 


Spi 


ingfield. Va. 


Croom,AshIe> C 


R 


obersonWIle 


Cullipher, Merlin V 




Merry Hill 


Cunningham, Vicki 




Monroe 


Cutler, Clyde D„Jr 




Pinetown 


Darnell, Thomas B 


Silve 


Spring. Md. 


Davenport, DelorisF. 




Columbia 


Davidson, Donna S 




Statesville 


Davis, Bett\ G, 




Greenville 


Davis. Janus M. 




Ml Olive 


Davis. Jean J. 


M 


orehead City 






Beaufort 


Dawson, Dennis L. 




Wilson 


Deal, VickieK 




New Bern 


Dellinger, Loy | 




Greenville 


Denton. Laura R. 




Whriakers 


Derence, Sam D. 




( acriisliiiMi 


Dickens, Barbara G 




Whiteville 


Dill, Mali; 




New Bern 


Hill, William 1. 




New Bern 


Dillon, |ohnM 


U 


lneileh. X 1 


Pills, HelenM. 




Greensboro 


Dixon. Debra] 


Hi 


ndersonv/lle 


Dixon. Jean E. 




Hubert 


Dobson.JeanneL 




New Bern 


Dodd.Kristy L 




Wilmington 






44* J 



Dodson. James W. 


Greensboro 


Dodson. Sidney I. 


Franklin. V'u. 


Domme, C\ nihi.i A 


Virginia Beach, Va 


Dudley, |annette 


Knightdale 


Dunn, Marj 1 


( Inenlul 


Dunn. Shirley M 


Mur/reesboro 


Durham, David A. 


Kinston 


Dussinger, Sharon L. 


Alexantlnu. Va 


Eargle. Judyth A 


Raleigh 


Easterling, Cynthia L. 


Greenville 


Edwards. Deborah R. 


Greenville 


Kilw ards, Joyce A. 


Winterville 


Edwards. LollieC. 


Pemllelon 


Edwards, Marian L 


Tobaccoville 


Edwards, Richard C. 


Raleigh 


Edwards. Wanda S 


Wilson 


Elks. Thomas C. Jr 


Greem llle 


Ellison. Stephen I. 


Greensboro 


Englerl, David M 


Dix Hills, N V 


Erlis, Michael 


Kinston 


Erwin. Alice R. 


Rockingham 


Evans, Larry G. 


Henderson 


Everett, C. Blair 


Garner 


Ey, Alice N. 


New Bern 


Farmer, William L. 


Rock) Mount 


Farrar. Jackson L 


Gary 


Fauntleroy. Talmage R 


Hampton, Va. 


Feezor, Marion J. 


Siloam 


Ferguson, LydiaS 


Suffolk, Va 


Ferrell. Walton J 


Lucama 


Field, Bruce E. 


Veu j, ,,rl News, Va. 


Fishel. Emma R 


Franklinton 


Fisher. Sharon J. 


Greenville 


Flake. Patsj J. 


Farmviile 


Flanagan, Terrence G. 


Myer, Va 


Fleming, A. Wilkes 


Greenville 


Flinchum. Sharon A. 


Curlhage 


Flora, Steven W. 


Winslon-Sa/em 


Flowers, Ramona L. 


Rocky Mounl 


Floyd, Robin L. 


Henderson 


Forman, Margarel 1. 


Durham 


Foster, Susan B. 


Burlington 


Franke. LeoP 


Winterville 


Franklin. Nancy V. 


Raleigh 


Franks. Horace R. 


Tarboro 


Freeman. Donald S. 


Highland Park, N ) 


Fulton. Arm C. 


Durham 


Futrelle, Frances K 


Kenansville 


I i. miner. Julie D. 


Raleigh 


Garris. Del, ln,> 


Fountain 


Garrison, R,,l,er! E 


Burlington 


Gautier, Nancy K 


Washington 


Giambalva, Roxanne 1 


St fames, N V 


( ribson, James H.. Jr. 


Rockingham 


Gil, s,,n, William B. 


Rock) Mount, \ a 


Glass, James D . |r 


Newton .Square, /'a 



funiors 87 



Gobble, Clarence 1 


Winston-Salem 


Godfrey, Deborah A 


Washington, N. /. 


Godwin, Rhonda II 


Smithfield 


Goff, Virginia A. 


Wilson 


( Joldman, Elaine 1 1 


Norfolk, Va 


Goodell, Robert D. 


Greenville 


Goodman, Deborah L, 


Stalesville 


Goodrich. Catherine I 


All Olive 


Gordon, Stephen II 


( Jrrrnshnro 


Gorham, |anet E. 


Batfleboro 


Graham. George M. 


Fayetteville 


Granlham. Bonnie K. 


Alexandria, V'o 


Gray, John L 


Thomasville 


Gra> . Rodney K 


Greenville 


Green. Michael M. 


Salem 


Green. Sydney A 


Fninklinlon 


Gresham, David S. 


N. Wilkesboro 


Griffin, Marsha G 


Winslon-Salem 


Griffin, Rebecca | 


Snow Camp 


Grissom, Kathryn L. 


Wilmington 


Gunderson, Mark C. 


Winslon-Salem 


Gupton.KyleL. 


Chester. Va. 


Gurkin, [ack R 


Chocowinity 


Guthrie, JellenR. 


Svvansboro 


Guy.PhilipW 


Rocky Mount 


Hackney, Robert E 


Greensboro 


Hagan.C |eanne 


Goldsboro 


Hagna, Lydia L. 


Marion 


Hall, Denise M, 


Ruthin Glen. Va. 


Hamilton, Gary N. 


Adana. Turkey 


Hamilton, Virginia S. 


Brooklyn. N V 


Hanna, Nancy C. 


Salisbury. Md. 


Hannan. Emma-Ion P. 


Greenville 


Hannibal, Alice S. 


Kinston 


Harbaugh, Gregorj A 


Weslfield. N, / 


Harbers, Kathleen E 


Albemarle 


Hardin. Melva A. 


Kannapolis 


Hardison, Chesler C.. |r 


Plymouth 


Hardy, Phillip A 


PikeviJJe 


Hare, Paul R. 


Murfreesboro 


Harrell, Deborah A 


Graham 


Han-ell, Michael A 


New Bern 


Harrington, Robert M. 


Ayden 


Harris, Alan M. 


Rounoke Rapids 


Harris, Beckj 


New Bern 


Harris, Norman G., )r. 


Henderson 


Harris, Susan E. 


Gaslonia 


Harrison, Sharon M. 


Trenton 


Harl.Karol A. 


Farm v /lie 


Hartwell, |udithM 


Stalesville 


1 l.iirh. [oseph E 


Ml Olive 


f lay, Christopher 


Simsburg, Conn. 


Hedrick, Roberts. 


Thomasville 


Hellekson. Sallj |. 


Maxton 


Heller.Lisa 


FarmviJle 


Hemenway. Pamela | 


Rocky Mount 





V^ -N^ 7 ^ 







Henderson, Donna M 


Kinston 


Herring, William B. 


Tomahawk 


Hicks. Elizabeth E. 


Rock) Mount 


Hill.ElnoraY. 


Garland 


Hill.IndaE. 


Washington 


Hilliard, |erry E. 


Raleigh 


Hobbs, Cheryl L. 


Greensboro 


Hobbs.Gari I. 


Elizabeth City 


Hobg l.LinwoodT. 


Fayettevilie 


Hodges, DavidK 


Rocky Mount 


Hoggard, Minnie C. 


Windsor 


Holden, Susan L. 


Bronxville, N. Y 


Holland, Ricky T 


Ml Olive 


Holton. Alexander M., 


r New Bern 


Honnet, Janice E. 


Havelock 


Home, NeldaS. 


Whitevilie 


House. Jean C. 


Bethel 


1 louse, I.unnie F 


] robgood 


Hubbard. Patricia 1 


Omuhu, Neh 


Hudnell.Milburn R . |r 


Belhaven 


Hughes, Ronald A. 


Fayettevilie 


Hulsey, Barbara | 


Carthage 


Hulsey, |ulieG, 


Atlanta, Ga 


Humphries. Susan [,. 


Brandon, Miss 


Hutcherson, Valeric I.. 


Ahnskle 


[card, Charles A. 


\',\ ergreen 


ilsley, Dale H. 


Williston. IV. Y 


Ipock. William R. 


Pollocksvii/e 


Jackson. Andrew S. 


Elizabeth Citj 


Jackson, Ava E. 


Goldsboro 


Jackson, Cathy L. 


Dunn 


Jackson, Sallye J. 


Fairfax'. Va. 


Jackson, Terry I.. 


HamptonviJle 


James. Dehra L. 


Greenville 


|ames. M.inu k 


Greenville 


Jeffrnes. Anna C. 


HurlinKlnn 


Jefferson, Gretchen A 


Furmville 


Jeffords, DaphneG 


Wilmington 


Jenkins, C Glenn, 11 


Dallas 


Jenkins. Charles F. 


LaGrange 


Jenkins. Cynlhia J. 


Robersonviile 


Jennings. Jane L. 


Wilmington 


Jernigan. Charlotte R. 


Aulander 


|ohannesen, Roberl W 


Jr. Greenville 


|ohnson, Claudia E. 


Fayettevilie 


Johnson, |oseph I. 


Goldsboro 


[ohnson, Karen ] C 


oloniai Meij;hls. Va 


Johnson, Landrea K. 


Maxton 


Johnston, Lloyd W , |r, 


Greenville 


[ones, Eva 1) 


i love Citj 


[ones, Ins \l 


Nakina 


Jones. Kathj D. 


Smith/ield 


Jones. Laura A. 


Goldsboro 


Jones, Michael D. 


Virginia Beach, Va 


Jones. Phoebe 


Richlands 


Jones, Teresa L. 


Wheaton, AM 



[ordan, Cheryl A. Ct 


lonial Heights. Vu. 


Jordan, LelhaG, 


Fayetteville 


Joyner, Elizabeth R 


Farmville 


Justice. Gary P. 


Snow Camp 


Kasper. Linda K 


Silver Spring. Mil. 


Kaylor. Alice L. 


Goidsboro 


Kearney, James J., Ill 


Littleton 


Keeler. Rebecca ] 


Greenville 


Keith, Angela G. 


LilJington 


Keller, Virginia C. 


Cerro Gordo 


Kelly, Susan E. 


Cameron 


Kemezis, Lea M. 


Closter. IV, J. 




Winston-Salem 


Key.PaulaS 


Ararat 


Keyser, Bonnie M. 


Clemmons 


Killingsworth. Kathj T 


New Bern 


Kimmel, Frances M. 


Dunn 


Kirk, Edward B 


Durham 


Klenke, Dwighl A 


Travis AFB, Caiij 


Klullz. HughL. 


Concord 


Klutlz, Pamela D, 


Alt. Pleasant 


Knight. Leslie E. 


Charlotte 


Knox. Auretla D. 


Cornelius 


Koonce. Kathy N. 


Trenton 


Kornegay, Susan E. 


Tarboro 


Krause.GaryK. 


Elizabeth City 


Krewek.RayA. 


Greenville 


Kucz\ nski, I.\ nn A. 


Goidsboro 


LaGrange, Perry K 


Rockj Mount 


Lamm, Jim 


Lumberton 


Lamp, Nancy E. 


Oxford 


Lancaster, Alice L, 


Rocky Mount 


Landis, Jodie P, 


Rocky Mount 


Langston, Jeannine B. 


New Bern 


Langston, Lucretia I, 


Temple Hills. Aid 


Lanier, Philip J. 


Winston-Salem 


Lasater, Edward U. 


Erwin 


Laskowski. Constance 


Livingston, N J 


Lawrence, Nan G. 


Alount Airy 


Layden.RitaM 


Belvidere 


Leach, Lynwood W. 


Cameron 


Lee, Jack 


Lumberton 


Lee, Roberl R 


Rocky Mount 


Leggett, Nancy C. 


Greenville 


Leggette, Evangeline 


Bridgelon 


Leonard, [eryl G. 


Beaufort 


Letchworth, Stanley A 


Tarboro 


Leutgens, Kevin M. 


Jacksonville 


I,r\ ine, Ze\ B 


Reidsville 


Lewis, LoisR. 


Hillsborough 


Lewis, WilburnL . Jr 


Greensboro 


Light. Nancy |, 


Newark, Del 


Liles, Philip F 


San ford 


Lindell, |ml\ 1) 


Fayetteville 


Lindley.Joh'nT 


Raleigh 


Little. William T. 


Roanoke Rapids 





Long. Anila L. 


Durham 


I. nng, David E, 


Durham 


Longworth. Nancy E. V 


irginia Beach. Va. 


Lovell, Kirk M. 


New Bern 


Lowrance, Patricia A, 


Charlotte 


Lovvry, Frieda N. 


Pembroke 


Lucas, Blaine K. V 


irginia Beach. Va. 


Lucas. Dalphine 


Elm City 


Lucas, Robert M. 


Erwin 


Lundy. Sarah A. 


Charlotte 


Luper, Anita Y 


Rocky Mount 


Lupton. James L., jr. 


Washington 


Lyerly, William J. 


Kinston 


Lynch. Kalhie I. 


Hillsborough 


Mahaffey, Charles O.. |r. 


Winston-Salem 


Mangum. Baxter D. 


Angler 


Mangum. Shirley F. 


Lillington 


Manley, Margaret A. 


Falls Church. Va. 


Manley.MarolynL 


Conway 


Manning, [essica S. 


Roper 


Marsh. Jeffrey F. 


Wadesboro 


Marsh. Tom K. 


Washington, D. C. 


Martin, Kenneth M, 


Wadesboro 


Martindale. Belinda Y. 


Greensboro 


Martino. Patricia L. 


Adelphi. Md. 


Mason. Anna K. 


New Bern 


Mason. Susan M. 


Greenville 


Masotti. John W, 


Charlotte 


Massengill.R Craig 


Smithfield 


Matthews. Leonard C. 


Enfield 


Maultsby. James E, 


Hope Mills 


Maxwell. Charles S, 


Fayelteville 


Mayer. Ellen P 


Danvers, Mass. 


Mayo. Carolyn A. 


Yen Hi-rn 


McAlister. Louise E. 


Charlotte 


McCoy, Alva R 


Elizabeth City 


McDonald, Carolyn A, 


Charlotte 


McDonald, Tanya V. 


Charlotte 


McDougall. Micki J. 


Wilmington 


McGaffin, Karen ] 


Raleigh 


McGaughey. Patricia A. 


Fayelteville 


Mclntire. Elaine S 


Norfolk, Va. 


McKay. Rick [., ]r 


Lilesville 


McLamb, D. Gave 


Clinton 


McLaughlin, Ann B. 


Columbia 


Meadows. Paula D 


Annandale. Va. 


Mendenhall, Carol A, 


Williamstnn 


Mendenhall, Debbie N. 


Winston-Salem 


Mendenhall, Franklin K 


Walnut Cove 


Merrell, DanL. 


Aydletl 


Milburn, William T. 


Winston-Salem 


Miller. E. Kaye 


Laurel Springs 


Miller. Patricia F. 


Oriental 


Mills. Barbara R. 


Yen Bi'i n 


Mitchell. Patricia J. 


Fayelteville 


Mizelle. Brenda L 


Windsor 



funi 



Mizelle, Kenneth E 


Windsor 


Mobley, Lois D. 


Williumston 


Mohle, Becky S. 


Aayden 


Monroe, Fonda 11 


Raeford 


Moore. Barbara M. 


Wilson 


Moore, Elna 


Hurdle Mills 


Moore, Katie B. 


Spring Hope 


Moore, William 1) 


( rreenville 


Moore, William M. 


Littleton 


Morgan, fames (> 


Calypso 


Morris. Annie F. 


Haveiock 


Morris, Elizabeth B. 


Castonia 


Morrone, Robert | 


Cherrj Hill, N J. 


Morion, Van R, 


Pollocksville 


Moser, Chere D. 


Charlotte 


Moser.Deede 


Charlotte 


Moss, Cheryl D. 


Kunnapolis 


Moss. |aniceL. 


Durham 


Mudrock, Joyce R. 


S Plainfield, N. /. 


Mumford, Vivian I. 


\yden 


Murphy, William II. 


Snow Hill 


Murray. Kalhryn |. 


Salisbury 


Musser, Deborah 1. 


Eion 


Myers, Marj P. 


Candor 


Myers, Wayne R, 


Winston-Salem 


Nazmi. Ansari M. 


Tehran, Iran 


Nestor, Kathleen M. 


Wayne, N | 


Newby, Cynthia E. 


Elizabeth City 


Newton. Cheryl K. 


Falls Church, Va. 


Newton. Naomi 


Mars ton 


Nichols. Devera A. 


Wilson 


Nicklaw, Kathleen K. 


Wilmington 


Nielsen, Linda G 


Dunn 


Niklason, Gary 


Greenville 


Nimitz. Charles H. 


Virginia Beach. Va. 


Nipper. Rick 


Greensboro 


Nixon, Cynthia G 


Edenton 


Noble, DavidS. 


New Bern 


Nobles. Tana L. 


Plymouth 


Noffsinger, Sarah | 


Wilmington 


Norell, Nancy E. 


District Hgts.,Md. 


Norman. Shirley A. 


Winston-Salem 


Norman, Walter E. 


Creswell 


Norris. Tommie R 


Chocowinity 


Obrecht, William F. 


Baltimore, Md. 


O'Briant, Deborah E 


Durham 


Ogden. Donna F. 


Hoanolie Rapids 


Olmstead, Glenn H. 


Raleigh 


Oliver, Cathy L. 


Chapel Hill 


Oliver, Julia B, 


Greenville 


O'Neal, William 1) 


Rockingham 


Ormond, Barbara B. 


Pinetown 


Orrell, Mike H. 


Winston-Salem 


O'Shea, Thomas E. 


Lexington Pk., Aid. 


Ouellette, |ohn 


Ontario, Canada 


Outlaw. Barbaras 


Winston 









l*M 



Packer. Betl\ ■ |. 


Clinton 


Page. ]ane M. 


Greenville 


Page.WillardF..Jr. 


Fayettevifie 


Palese, Gerry E. 


Baltimore, AM 


Pariliic Rebecca A. 


Sanford 


Parker. Barbara F 


Goldsboro 


Parker. Man B. 


( )urner 


Parker. Roger D. 


Pollocksville 


Parris, Sieve A. 


Freemon! 


Parrish. Freda D. 


Rock) Mount 


Parsley. Elizabelh A. 


Statesville 


Parsons. James C. Jr. 


Greenville 


Patterson, Debra M. 


Winston-Salem 


Paul. Jo A. 


Ayden 


Pearce, Gwendolyn R. 


Woodland 


Pearce, ]ean W. 


Zebulon 


Pearman, Stella ). 


Goldsboro 


Pegram.GlendaS. 


Tounsville 


Perkins. Calbert 1, 


Goldsboro 


Perkins. Kenneth T, 


Greenville 


Perry, Audre> | 


Rockford, III 


Perryman. Timothy W. 


Rock) Mount 


Peterson, Cynthia L. 


Elizabethtown 


Peterson. Kristin A. 


Fayetteville 


Pharr, Jonathan 


Plymouth 


Phillips, Gail L. 


Rockville.Md 


Phillips, Kathj M 


BunnieveJ 


Phillips, KathrynM. 


Charlotte 


Phillips. Randalls 


Greem llh 


Phillips. Thomas C. 


Columbia, S. C. 


Phirmey, Pamela G. 


/■'in rltev lilt' 


Pinkston, Caroline D. 


U hitei ille 


Pitt. Sheila E. 


Rocky Mount 


Pittman, LynnW. 


Greenville 


Pittman, Will B., |r. 


New Bern 


Plott, Deborah A. 


Waynesville 


Plyler, David C. 


Thomasville 


Poindexter, K Randy 


High Point 


Poore, Linda T. 


Chocowinity 


Powell, Francelle 


Ca-Vel 


Powell. Kathon M. 


Brunswick 


Povner. Mary G. 


Moyock 


Praisarnti, Surhum 


Bangkok, Thulium/ 


Prescott, Diana A. 


Suunsboro 


Prevail , Frank W. 


Lumberton 


Prevelte, Richard L. 


Greenville 


Prezioso. Rhonda C. 


Virginia Beach, Va 


Price. Donna C. 


IV'illiumston 


Price, Karen J. 


Charlotte 


Price, Mary J. 


Ellerbe 


Price, Norma R. 


Jamesville 


Prince, Cathy S. 


Apex 


Prince. James R., Ill 


Charlotte 


Proctor, Carol A. 


Fountain 


Puente. Fernando R 


Toms River, N ]. 


Pugh, PamelaT. 


Durham 



Pulliam, B. Elaine 


Henderson 


Punte,Mar> E. 


Chapel Hill 


Quinley.SherrieL. 


Newport News. Va. 


Quinn, Susan A. 


Kinston 


Rabens, Dea C. 


Fayetteviile 


Ragazzo, |(i Ann 


Chapel Hill 


Raines. |ohn E 


Fdenton 


Ramsey, Joseph 1! .. [r. 


Rocky Mount 


Ratcliff. Patricia] 


Pantego 


K,i\ , 1 lonstance |. 


Chapel Hill 


Reams. Sidnej ] 


Havelock 


Redding. Sidney D. 


Huberl 


Reid, Vivian S. 


Charlotte 


Reville, Lynn A. 


Woodbridge. Va. 


Rich. LillieA. 


Clinton 


Riddle. Gail R. 


Fayetteviile 


Riggs, Thomas W.. jr. 


New Bern 


Rigsby. Thomas E. 


Weldon 


Ring, Dennis | 


Carthage 


Rivera LuisE 


Fayetteviile 


Robbins.JohnT. 


Rocky Mount 


Robbins, Martha C 


Pinetown 


Roberson, Gregory L. 


Robersonville 


Roberson. Linda K 


Williamston 


Roberlson. Joseph I. 


Greensboro 


Robertson, T'ommieL. 


Go/dsboro 


Roe. Deborah A. 


Hendersonville 


Rogers, Debbie V. 


Raleigh 


Rogerson, Ebbie |. 


Williamston 


Rose, RhelaC. 


Kinston 


Rose. Sandra |. 


Clinton 


Russell, Suzanne C. 


Cranite Falls 


Russn, Loretta M 


Hyattsviile, Md. 


Sadler, Suzanne M. 


Greenville 


Safy, Laura E. 


Rocky Mount 


Sale, Paula L. 


Mechanicsville. Va. 


Sanford. Marj A 


Charlotte 


Sauls. Dean P. 


Fremont 


Sauls. Roberl 11 


Greenville 


Saunders, Lj ml.i 1. 


Ramseur 


Sawyer. Stephanie A, 


Greenville 


Schiffel, Erhard P., Ill 


Charlotte 


Schmidt, Caryl E, 


FAon College 


Schmidtke, Mary L. 


Fayetteviile 


Schofield, |anette S 


Charleston. S. C, 


Scoggins, Joyce R. 


Godwin 


Seacord, Barbara 1. 


Charlotte 


Sedgwick, Susan E. 


Jacksonville 


Seymour, Susan B. 


Greenville 


Shai kleton, |amesR 


Burlington 


Shackelford. Lorraine 


Pikeville 


Shallcross. Jacqueline 


M. Smith field 


Shankle, Georgia A. 


Norwood 


Shannon, Mary P, 


Vienna, Va. 


Sharpless, Ronald L, 


Chinquapin 


Shaw, Susan | 


Wushmgtnn 





m%m $& 












Shea. Michael R. 


Virginia Beach, Va. 


Shearin, Deborah M. 


Louisburg 


Shearon. Beverly P. 


Greenville 


Sherman. William D. 


Fayetteville 


Shinglelon. Susan C. 


Slaniunsburg 


Shore, Thomas R. 


Durham 


Shreve, William H. 


Wilson 


Sibley, Richard D. 


Greenville 


Sigmon, P. Denise 


Newton 


Silherman. Bruce I. 


Statesville 


Siler. DarrellK. 


Greensboro 


Simmons. Lynda M. Si 


7'homos, Virgin Is. 


Simonds. Lawrence J. 


Rockville. Md. 


Sink. Stephen C. 


Durham 


Sloan. M. Carol 


Durham 


Sloan, Phyllis G. 


Ml. Olive 


Small. William F. 


Elizabeth City 


Small. Yvonne F. 


Edenton 


Smith. Catherine H, 


Goldsboro 


Smith, David C. 


Rockmghum 


Smith. George T. 


Winterville 


Smith. Janet C. 


Atlantic 


Smith, Karen D. 


Ramseur 


Smith. Mary A. 


Greenville 


Smith. Nan H. 


Launnburg 


Smith. Peggy D. 


Kinston 


Smith, Ronald E. 


Spring Lake 


Smith. William J 


Greenville 


Smith, William M. 


Jacksonville 


Snypes. Luther J 


Goldsboro 


Southard. Alan J. 


Grefnville 


Southerland, Mar) S 


Chinquapin 


Spain. Linda A. 


Greenville 


Speas. Deborah S. 


Mor^anton 


Speight. Robert S., |r 


Elm Qu- 


Spell, Robert G, 


el in ton 


Sprouse. K. Denise 


Monroe 


Staggs. Ronald L. 


Engiewood, Ohio 


Stainback. Gary ]. 


Raleigh 


Stampar. Gail L. 


Wrightsvil/e Beach 


Standock, Stephanie M. 


Fayetteville 


Starling. Elizabeth |. 


Fayetteville 


Stauffer. Kennard S. B 


larcliff Manor. NV 


Steinbeck, (ensina 


Greenville 


Stephenson, Beverly G. 


Angier 


Stine, Lynda L. 


Greenville 


Stokes, Rebecca P. 


Washington 


Stone. Debra E. 


Dunn 


Sll ange. It, ii lial .1 | 


Annapolis. Md. 


Strickland, BrendaL. 


Raleigh 


Strickland. Lewis R. 


Greenville 


Slricklin, Cathy |o 


Durham 


Sluckey. M. Lydia 


Rulrigh 


Sugar. JoAnn 


St. Pauls 


Suggs, Terray F. 


Whiteville 


Sumerell, Danny C. 


Kinston 



Juniors 95 



Sullon. David A. 


Kinston 


Sutton. Patti E. 


A loo roe 


Swain. Guj S. 


Columbia 


Swan. Patricia G. 


Soulhport 


Swann. Steven D. 


New Castle. Ind. 


Talbot, Clarence N. 


Fayettevilie 


Talley, Warren 


Greenville 


T.illon. Valerie H. 


Greenville 


Tart. Elizabeth A 


Newton Grove 


Taylor, Jacqueline M. 


Greenville 


Taylor. Phillip C. 


Rocky Mount 


Taylor. SherlD. 


Charlotte 


Temple, Gwen 


Fayettevilie 


Terry, Diane 


Roxboro 


Tharrington. Hazel C. 


Raleigh 


Thomas. Doris A. 


Spring Lake 


Thomas, Gene D. 


Beaulaville 


Thomas. Martha F. 


Williamston 


Thomas. Robert W. 


Fayettevilie 


Thomas. Wendy E. 


Virginia Beach, Va. 


Thompson. Andrea L. 


Greenville 


Thompson. Terry V. 


Elizabeth City 


Thorlon. AlanC. 


Huvelock 


Thorton, Debbie H. 


Greenville 


Thornlon. Linwood E. 


Ml ( Wive 


Thornlon. Jennifer O. 


Mt. Olive 


Tilley, Rainelle 


Kinston 


Tipton, Vickie L. 


Huvelock 


Toler, Noah A.. Jr. 


Elizabeth City 


Totty, Sara L. 


Earlvsville. Va. 


Towns, Rita C. 


Raleigh 


Tripp. Dennis L. 


Greenville 


Tromsness. John H. 


Greenville 


Tudor, Pauline E, 


Plumoulh, Minn. 


Turner. Tony M. 


Newport 


Uhteg, Sharon E. 


Kinston 


Vail. Luke H. 


Pikeville 


Vail, Robert E. 


Greensboro 


Vance, Keith Z. 


Jamestown 


Vanderford. Addie L. 


Robersonville 


Vandever. Frank A. 


Havelock 


Vaughan, Vickie J. 


Durham 


Vincent. Larry G. 


Winterville 


Voliva, William B., |r. 


Columbia 


Wade, Martha C. 


Kinston 


Wagner, Linda K 


Newport News, Va. 


Wagner, Nancy E. 


East Northporl. N. V. 


Wagner. Rebecca M. 


Washington 


Wallace, HettieL. 


Edenton 


Waller, DwighlD. 


Mt, Olive 


Walker, Michaels. 


Greenville 


Walters, William). 


Greensboro 


Ward, Carolyn M. 


Nakina 


Warren. Mark R. 


Roxboro 


\Y.ii ren, Nancy F. 


Wilson 


Warwick, Rebeci .1 E, 


Elizabethtoivn 




96 funiors 




Washington. Shirley A. 


Kinston 


Walkins, Patricia | 


Garner 


Weaver. |oj Y, 


Angier 


Webb, Curtis O 


Winterville 


Webb. George H. 


Asheville 


Webb, Kathryn D 


Macclesfield 


Webb, Marietta A. 


Asheville 


Weber, Douglas A. 


Haddon/ield, N. /. 


Weeks. Deborahs 


Bethel 


Wells, [erryH. 


Wallace 


West, Kenneth M 


Goldsboro 


West, Sandra M. 


Kenly 


White. Alice M, 


Elizabeth City 


White, Barbara], 


Williamston 


White. Joselyn |. 


Manson 


While, Karen F. 


High Point 


While, Terry D. 


Belvidere 


While. William M. 


New Bern 


Whiteford, William F. 


Greenville 


Whitley, Dolores S 


Charlotte 


Whitley, Martha A 


Alt Pleasunt 


Wiggins, |ames L. 


Louisburg 


Wilcox, |ames M. 


New Bern 


Wilder, Linda L. 


Baltimore. Md. 


Wilkerson, Kathrj n E. 


Greenville 


Williams. Brenda K. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Williams. |ohnK 


Autryville 


Williams, Carolyn F. 


/umesville 


Williams. Christopher K 


Mew Bern 


Williams. Dale 1. 


Greenville 


Williams, Daniel R. 


Jacksonville 


Williams, Elizabeth A 


Afbertson 


Williams, [udj K 


Veil fieri 


Williford, Katherine E 


Elm City 


Willis. Lucy A. 


Wanchese 


Willis, Shelby, |r 


Beaufort 


Wilson. Donald M 


Tar Heel 


Wilson. Emma D. 


Sanlord 


Wilson, Gloria | 


LaGrange 


Wilson. Worlh B . |r 


Greenville 


Winhorn. Linda | 


Ahoskie 


Winstead, Wanda F. 


Kim City 


Winston, Helen R, 


Nelson. Va 


Wolfe, MarlhaS. 


Rocky Mount. Va 


Wood, Gary F. 


Godwin 


Wood, Rebecca I, . 


Turboro 


Wood, Susan |. 


Mamers 


Woodruff , Jeffery C, 


Tarboro 


Woody, Cynthia A. 


Hoxboro 


Worsley. Anne L. 


Rocky Mount 


Worlhington. Edward A. 


Jr. LaGrange 


Worthington, (esse D. 


Chadbourn 


Worlhington. Linda L. 


LuGrange 


Wrenn. Pamela G 


Roxboro 


Wright, Debra 1, 


Hobbsville 


Wyatt. Carol 


FederaJsburg, Md 



Wylie, Deborah Y. 


Charlotte 


Wylie, Gladys W 


\ru Hern 


~i ancey , Oliver 1 1 


Norlina 


Yokley. Nina G. 


Mounl Airy 


Young, Barbara A 


China Grove 


Zirbs. Carol A. 


Elkins, W. Va 


Zum Brunnen, lanelle L. 


Salisbury 



Adams, Bobbj R 


Goldsboro 


Adams, Cheryl M. 


Merry Hill 


Ainsley, Charles 


Tarboro 


Aldridge, Stephen W. 


Greenville 


Allen, James E. 


Cury 


Andersen. HeidiK 


Wake Forest 


Anderson, James K 


Havelock 


Andrews. Allyson R. 


Farmville 


Andrews. Debbie K. 


Durham 


Angle, Karen G. 


Ox lord 


Archibald, |ohn A 


Stalesvil/e 


Armstrong, Dorothy A 


Slaten Is., N, Y. 


Alkins, Nancy E. 


Norfolk, Va. 


Atwell, Larr> S. 


Concord 


Austin, Frederick W 


Medford. N. Y. 


Austria, Jaime X 


Norfolk, Va 


Bailey, Kathj 1. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Bailey, Vicky L. 


Wilson 


Baker. Uremia 1. 


Rock) Mounl 


Baker. Jacquelyn II 


Greenville 


Baker. Jennifer L. 


Willow Springs 


Baker, Peggy E. 


Aulander 


Baldwin, Edward 1. 


Riverside. N. /. 


Barbee, Aubrey K 


Garner 


BanBer. [asper D 


Charlotte 


Barefoot, William T. 


Knur Ouks 


Barnes. Edward W. 


Murlreesboro 


Barnes. |udith W. 


Virginia Beach. Va. 


Barnes. Karen S. 


Roper 


Barnes. Vikki S. 


Rocky Mounl 


Barnes. Wanda G, 


Lucama 


Barnette, Evelyn D. 


Raleigh 


Barnhill. Kenneth M. 


Rocky Mount 


Barnhill. Sarah ]. 


\'eu Herri 


Barrett, Sarah E, 


Roanoke Rapids 


Barrow Vickie L. 


Kinslon 


Bartlett. Patricia G, 


Charlolle 


Bass. Allison E, 


Fay 


Bass, Linda G. 


Wilson 


Bass, Michael B. 


Burlington 



Sopho- A 
mores 




jjjjjlj^^^* 



Sophomores 




ass. Robert P. 


Newton Grove 


atchelor, Paula S. 


Wilson 


alien. Sandra M. 


Whiteville 


alls, Hazel M. 


Rocky Moun! 


aucom. Kathy G. 


Walslonburg 


aynor. Susan E. 


Plymouth 


easlon. Geoff D. 


High Point 



Beddard, James R.. Jr. Hoanoke Rapids 

Beddard, Mary C. Roanoke Rapids 
Beddingfield. Howard W., |r. Spring Hope 

Belcher. Cheryl C. Oxford 

Bell. Beverly M. Durham 

Bell, CarolynS. Chesterfield, S C 

Belton. Phyllis A. Ml. Airy 



Benjamin. Ste\ en D 


Woodbridge, Vu 


Bennett. Richard D. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Berry. Margaret E. 


Hurdle Mills 


Berry, Paul R, 


Wendell 


Best. Edward P.. Jr. 


VVtnston-Salem 


Bells. WilmerC. Ill 


Raleigh 


Biddell, Joe A. 


Laurinburg 


Biggerstaff, Teresa C. 


Rocky Mount 


Bishop. Susan 


Statesville 


Bittner. Susan J. 


Morehead City 


Blackwood, Sandra G. 


I Jreensbnrn 


Blake, |asper E., Jr. 


Ahoskie 


Bland. Dianne 


Wallace 


Blue. Claudia D. 


Sanford 


Bobbitt, Lili D. 


Spring Hope 


Boggs. Karen D. 


Springfield. V'a. 


Boll. James M. 


Winston-Salem 


Bosnick. David R. 


Syosset. N. V 


Boswell. Pamela A. 


Durham 


Bottoms. Marilyn N. 


Wilson 


Boyelle. Ethel M 


Faison 


Boyette, Josephine E. 


(,'rrenville 


Boyelle, Stephen V. 


Raleigh 


Boykin. Carolyn E. 


Garner 


Boykin, Donna L. 


Kenly 


Boykin, Patricia L. 


Wilson 


Bradford, Elizabeth O. 


Eden 


Bradford, Karin 


Wilmington 


Bradner, Kenneth L. 


Greensboro 


Bradshaw. Mary R. 


Raleigh 


Bradsher, Sally E. 


Hurdle Mills 


Bragunier. Debbie 


[ndian Head. Aid 


Branch. Emily A. 


Orrum 


Branch. Lena K. 


Winterville 


Branch. Linda Sue 


Orrum 


Branch. Mark T. 


Fayette; ille 


Braxlon. Carolyn A. 


Maury 


Brazell, Deborah A. 


Weldnn 


Brett, Jerry 


Murfreesboro 


Brewer, Jeffrey L. 


Silver Spring, Md 


Bridges, Sidney R 


Kenlj 


Briggs, Linda D. 


Su ansboro 



Sophomores 9.9 



Broaddrick, Sylva E, 




Greenville 


Brock. Ginger K. 




Warsaw 


Brodsky, MarkW. 




Greenville 


Bruuks, Vicki A 


n 


nstnn-Sulem 


Brooks, Vick> | 




Bath 


Browder, Bannister R. 


III u 


nston-Saiem 


Brown, Alex C. 




Jacksonville 


Brown, Brenda A. 




Goldsboro 


Brown, Debra A. 




Rose Kill 


Brown, Karen L. 




Charlotte 


Brown. Martha E. 




Raleigh 


Brown. Nancy K. 




Greenville 


Brown, Sanford M . |r 


Ho 


moke Rapids 


Bruce, Richard K. 




Durham 


Bryan, Lynwood S. 




Oxford 


Bryant, Frances D. 




Durham 


Bryant, Patricia G. 




Lillington 


Buck. Nancy L. 




Winterville 


Buehler. |ane A, 




Fairfax, Va. 


Bullock, Cynthia M, 




U'llllumslon 


Bunoe, David B 




Sledmun 


Bunn, Lauralyn 




New Bern 


Bunting, Gregg j 




Greenville 


Burdett. Donna L, 




Raleigh 


Burnette.Mark E. 


A I 


orehead City 


Burroughs. James, Jr. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Burton. Doris |. 




Washington 


Butler, Linda D, 


Winston-Salem 


Butler, Mary C. 




Tabor City 


Butner, Freda A 




I'uliui i:o\ illr 


Byrd, KathrynA, 


Charleston, S. C. 


Cagle, Monte F. 




Ashehoi o 


Callihan. Cathy E. 


Kli/ubelhtovvn 


Cameron, ( larole B, 




Greenville 


Campbell. |anel 1). 




Rockinghum 


Campbell. Kimberlj A 


Siive 


r Spring, Md. 


Campbell, Robert |. 




Jacksonville 


Campen, Mary D. 


Che 


sapeake, Va. 


Cannan, Michael W. 


Mays Landing, N. /. 


Capps, Ricky D. 




Erwin 


Carmone, Claudia 




Norfolk. Va. 


Carpenter. ConnieS. 




New Bern 


Carr. |ennifer L. 


R 


chmond, Va. 


Carter. Frankie J. 




Charlotte 


Carter, Kathy | 


Winston-Salem 


Castleberry. Susan B. 




Wendell 


Cate, Charlotte |. 




Reidsville 


Cates. Sheila 1) 




Durham 


Caudell, Holly J. 




High Point 


Cavanaugh, |anet I. 




locky Mount 


( lhampion, Nancy J. 




Raleigh 


Chan, Joseph T. 




Hong Kong 


Chapman, Barbara J. 




Fayetteville 


Chapman, Joseph S. 




Fayetteville 


Chappie. Randall B, 




Raleigh 


Chavasse, Elizabeth A. 




Raleigh 



AAPMfl 




100 Sophomores 




ft &£#0 

IfilMfsl v ■ I fc'*a#..L.- . Yll 




Cheney, Fred K. 
Clark. Donna S 
Clark. Felicia A. 
Clark, I.ii A 
Clark.Mark 1. 
Clark, Robin C. 
Clark, Sidne) P 

Clemons. Eldred Y 
Clodfelter. Vickie E 
Cobb, [aniceC. 
Cobb, Sherrj B. 
Cole, Barbara D. 
Colej , Margaret A. 
Colglazier, [oan M 

Collins, Debbie E. 
Combs, Richard C. 

Comby, William B 
Com|itnn. Linda L. 
Compton, Vii k\ R 
Conh n, Doris ) i 

Cook. Ronald G. 

Cooper, Kenneth A, 
Coppage, Jesse L. 
Corbin. Becton W. 
Cottrell, Candice A 
Council. Mary I,. 
Cowan, Deborah C. 
Cowan, William K 

Cox, Craig M 
Cox, Lynda D. 
Cox, Marj I. 
Cox, Wanda S 
Craft, Annie M. 
Creath, [udith A. 
Creef, LudfordT., Ill 



Cress, Christine |. 
Crissman. |ames D. 
Crosland, Mary P. 
Crowe, < Ineda M 
Crump. Debra E. 
Cunningham, Robei 
Curlee, Robert H 

Currie, Neil XI 
Culchin, Anna K. 
Daniel, LetitiaG 
Daniel, Sylvia I) 
Darby, Marshall A. 
Daughtry, Luther S 
Davenport, Carol) n 

Davidson, Alariche 

Davis, Jennie L 
Davis, PaulC 
Davis, Ten) R 
Day.DevinF 
Dean.Patrii iaG 
Deans. Ann I 



Arlington, Va. 
La Crunge 
Charlotte 
Pinetops 
Havelock 
Durham 
Wilson 



Durhum 

Thamasville 

Elm Cil\ 

Kinston 

Goldsboro 

Faison 

Roleigh 

Elizabeth City 

Kannapolis 

Conover 

Virgilina, Vu 

Burlington 

ice Frederick, Aid 

Fa) e!te\ lilt- 

Scotland Neck 

Robersonvdle 

Jacksonville 

Henderson 

Pinebluff 

Burlington 

Windsor 

Greenville 

U ilson 

Wilmington 

Washington 

Norlina 

Burlington, Moss 

Chesapeake, Va, 

RuraHall 
Aberdeen 
Charlotte 
Belvidere 

Lenoir 

Winston-Salem 

Greensboro 

Rocky Afount 

Rocky Mount 

Collinsville, Va 

U ilson 

Anderson. S C 

Plymouth 

Rock) Mount 

Charlotte 

Colerain 

[amesville 

Fremont 

Raritan, V / 

Elkton, Va 

Wilson 



Sopbomi 



Dean, Rhonda K 


Elkton. Vu. 


Deardorff. Carole E. 


Rockville.Md 


Deese, Virginia L. 


Albemarle 


DeMetei . Nancj L. 


Fayettevilie 


Derrough, [ulia 1. 


Asheville 


Devins, William Crott 


>n-on-Hudson, NY 


Diener, Frank J 


Greenville 


Dickens, Celesl K 


Littleton 


Dickens, Sandra 1. 


Whiteville 


Dickson, Waller M. 


Gastonia 


Diffee, Denise L. 


Burlington 


Dildy, |ohnA., |r. 


Wilson 


Dixon. Carolyn K 


Raleigh 


Dockey, Marcia E. 


Conover 


Doss Ellen C. 


Burlinglon 


Downes, Cindy A, 


Raleigh 


Doyle, Marj P, 


Belhesda, Md. 


Dudley, |ane L. 


Clinton 


Duncan, Thomas G. 


Durham 


Dunlap. Mark E. 


Durham 


Dunnagan, Michael G. 


Raleigh 


Duperock, Suzanne K, 


Wilmington 


Durham. Charles II 


Durham 


Durham, [an E. 


Greenville 


Durham. Lucretia | 


Snow Camp 


Dwiggins, Michael I, 


Mocksville 


Ealy, William C. 


Charlotte 


Eason, Richard A 


Macclesfield 


Ebbs, Laura R. 


Greenville 


Edgerton, [o Anne 


Morehead City 


Edgerlon. Mary A. 


Morehead City 


Edinger, Kathryn Mi 


»dford Lakes, N. /. 


Edwards. Charles A. 


Greenporl. N. Y. 


Edwards, Charles R 


Lewiston 


Edwards. Kai la M 


Washinglon 


Edwards, Michael C, 


Pendleton 


Elesha.Marj 1. 


Winslon-Salem 


Ellington, Martha D. 


Greensboro 


Elliott, Sharon 1, 


Carthage 


Ellis, Linda C. 


Fuquay-Vanna 


Ellrod, Dorothy I.. 


Tarbora 


Elwell, MarkS. 


Springfield, V'a 


Engiman. Gilda K 


Kernersville 


English. Betsy 


Kenansville 


Ennis, Janel P 


Burlinglon 


Ennis. Marshall 


Erwin 


Eubank, Cheryl Y, 


Trenton 


E\ ans, Garj 1 


Quanlico, V'a. 


Evans. Juilith A. 


Fremont 


Evans. Karen S. 


Fuyellevdle 


Evans. Man L. 


Goldsboro 


Evans, Stephen | 


Greenville 


Fahrenbruch, Kathy A 


Cherry Hill, N / 


Faircloth, Thomas A. 


Sledman 


Falk. Thomas | 


Millersville, Pa. 


Farina, Bradley C 


/acksonville 




102 Sophomor.es 




Feeney, Bob 


Neptune, \ ) 


Feher. Amy L. 


Ah osftie 


Ferebee. Janet B. 


Andrews 


Ferguson. Charlene D. 


Virginia Beach, Vu. 


Finch, Jacqueline E. 


Henderson 


Fisher, Sharon D 


Fayetteville 


Flaherty, Tama ] 


RnckvilU: Mil 


Fleming. Linda A. 


Greenville 


Fletcher. Bonnie I.- 


Durham 


Flint. Brenda |. 


Tarboro 


Flythe, Rheta J. 


AuJander 


Floyd. Barbara A. 


Wilson 


Folsom. ]an L. 


Fayetteville 


Fondren. Anne E. 


Rounoke Rapids 


Fort. Graham C. 


fCinston 


Fowler, William N. 


Colerain 


Franklin. Vicki Y. 


Graham 


Freeman. John D. 


Arlington, Va 


Freeman. Sally L. 


Greenville 


Frye. Barry E. 


Brown Summit 


Frye. Donna C. 


Hickory 


Frye. Janice L. 


All .\ir\ 


Futrell. Joseph M. 


Tarboro 


Gambella, Diane 


Goldsboro 


Garber. Suzanne K. 


Woodbr/dge, Va. 


Gardner. Scot G. 


Suffolk. Va 


Garris. Cynthia D. 


.Ayilell 


Garris. Vickie J. 


Greenville 


Gaskins, Deborah K. 


\ni Bei n 


Gaskins, Stephanie A. 


Manteo 


Garretson. Jayne D. 


l\ fisliinu.lun 


Gay. Jacqueline A. 


Kinston 


Gebhardt, Robert D 


Old Tappan, N. j. 


Gentry, Catherine R 


floxboro 


Ghent. Ginna 


Alexandria. Va 


Gibson, |uliaA. 


Raeford 


Giddings, Martha E. 


Jacksonville 


Gidley.MaryE. 


Greenville 


Gillette, WrayY. 


Wilson 


Goddard. |udj D. 


Robersonville 


Godwin, Betty S. 


Linden 


Goodman. Victoria G. 


Louis; iile, Kj 


Goodson, Barbara E. 


Kinston 


Gorrie. Elizabeth M. 


Williamston 


Gosnell. Linda K 


Murfreesboro 


Gosnell, Pamela F. 


Murfreesboro 


Gould. Juanila F. 


Greenville 


Graham. Ridgely M. 


Ren/s\ illr 


Gramling. Paula A. 


Cranford, N / 


Grant. Robert L. 


Hendersonville 


t Ira; , Barbara G. 


Kinston 


Gray. Frederick L. 


Williamston 


Green, Karen S 


Lumberton 


Greene. Roger L. 


Chesapeake. Va. 


Greene, Sara K, 


Swansboro 


Greene, William C, 


Naples, Flu 



Sophomoi 



Griffin. Deborah |. 


Rock) Mount 


Griffis, Dianne A. 


Kinslon 


Grimes, Mary G. 


Scot/and Neck 


Grimsley. Jackie I- 


Pollocksville 


Gulledge, William B. 


Raleigh 


Gundlach, HerbL 


Grepnsboro 


Gunter, Paula | 


Sanford 


Hahn.Billj | . |r. 


Albemarle 




Virginia Beach. Va. 


Hall. Harris M„ |r. 


Me bane 


Hall. Nancy E. 


Fayelteville 


Hall, Susan C, 


Tarboro 


Hanna, Judy L. 


Winston-Salem 


1 fanner, Nancj E. 


Rundleman 


Hanrahan, Teresa J. 


Falls Church, V'a. 


Hardee. MonaG. 


Greenville 


Hardin. Warren L. 


S'a.xupahan 


Hardwick, Donald E, 


Burlington 


Hardy. Carolyn R. 


Burlington 


Hardy, Debbi A. 


Concord 


Hargett, H. Glenn. Jr. 


Jacksonville 


Harmon. Glenn L. 


k'ings Mountain 


Harrell, Alice E. 


Wilson 


Harrell, CharleM., Ill 


Hertford 


Harrell, Connie R. 


Goldsboro 


Harrill, Shellj V 


Durhum 


Harris, Celia E. 


Farmville 


Harris, Diane M. 


Gnfton 


Harris, Edward 1. 


Beihaven 


Harris, Norris R. 


Statesville 


Harris, Veleta M. 


(Greenville 


Harrison. Sherwood M. 


New Bern 


Harrison. William P. 


Durham 


Hartel, Vickie A. 


Granite Quarry 


Harlis. Margaret I, 


Kinsion 


Hartis, Marsha E. 


Matthews 


Hartsell, Debra | 


Greenville 


Hartsfield, |eanne S, 


Kinslon 


Harvey. Willie H. 


New Bern 


Harward. Cheryl I.. 


Durham 


Hatch, Bettj 1. 


( ,'oidsboro 


Hatch. Debbie A 


Ml Olive 


Hatcher, Rhonda L. 


Garner 


Haverty, Barbara A. 


Hillside. N. /. 


Heffner, Cindy R. 


Durhum 


Heid, Gretchen L. 


Union, N. /. 


1 [eidenreich, |ames R. 


Greenville 


Helms, Briviitti' I. 


Beaufort 


Hendrix, Robin E. 


Tyner 


Hendrix, Steven C. 


Winston-Salem 


1 [ermann, Mary ]. 


Richmond, Va. 


Hile, Patricia C 


Williamsburg, Va. 


Hill. Belly I.. 


Garysburg 


Hill, Marsha W. 


Greenville 


Hill, Sara E 


Durhum 


Hiltz. Fredrick P 


Charlotte 




mm Sophomores 




Hinnant. Danny E. 


Selma 


Hinson, Roger L. 


Wilmington 


Hinson. Ronald L. 


Tarboro 


Hinton, Palsy A. 


Rock) Mount 


1 linton. Randy T. 


Princeton 


Hirschi, Carlton F . |r. 


Burlington 


Hobbs |osephS. 


Smithfield 


Hobbs, Sheila M. 


Raleigh 


Hobbs, Willie R 


Newton Grove 


Hodges, Elizabeth 11 


Washington 


Hogshire, Beverlj E 


Rocky Mount 


Holding, Debra J. 


Wake Forest 


Hollowell, Kathj I. 


Snuthport 


Holt, [oanA. 


Kinston 


Honeycutt. DennisG, 


Kannapolis 


Honeycutt, Jimmy A. 


Clinton 


Honeycutt, Philip I, 


Chud bourn 


Hooper, John R. 


Buxton 


1 Intuit, Cynthia V. 


New Hern 


Houghlon. Ray 1 1 


Charlotte 


House. Cheryi | 


F'runk/inlon 


Howard, Mark A 


S Fines 


Howell. Gregory 1, 


Annandu/e. Vu 


1 lowed. Donna L. 


Goidsboro 


How ie, Max M 


Matthews 


Hudson, Catherine D. 


Louisburg 


Hudson. Larry D. 


( !reem il/e 


Huggins, |ames L., |r. 


Midway I'k 


Hughes. Donald R 


Tar Heel 


1 login's. Emily A. 


Red Springs 


Hughes. Julia A. 


Wilmington 


Hunike, Nancy G. 


Durhum 


Humbles. Jannette E. 


Ayden 


Hunsucker, Anne R 


High Point 


Huntley, Thomas M. 


( Ireensboro 


Hurley. Frederick A. 


Conover 


I lux. VelnaR 


Roanoke Rapids 


Hyman.Gary S, 


McKeeCity, N. J 


Ibrahim. Ah 1 


Raleigh 


Jackson. Ceba A. 


Ml Dine 


lackson. Jerry A. 


Havelock 


[ackson, Susan E. 


SI Pauls 


Jacques, Janice A. 


K'inslon 


Jafari. Parvin 


7'ehrun. Iran 


James. Roby n A. 


McLean. V'u. 


Jarvis, Mary L. 


\\ den 


Jefferson, Barbara G. 


/'melon n 


Jenkins, My ra E. 


Robersonvilie 


[ornigan. Laura E. 


Au/ander 


Job. Gill C. 


Alh-mlul,-. X \ 


Johnson. Cynthia G. 


New Bern 


Johnson. Donnie R. 


/'dot Mm 


Johnson. Jeffrej A 


Durham 


|ohnson, |ohn R 


Raleigh 


Johnst>n. Lyn C. 


Raleigh 


Johnson. Michael W, 


Raleigh 



Sophomoi 



Johnson. Pamela G. 


Furmville 


[ohnson, Philips B. 


Richmond. Va. 


Johnson, SallieM. 


Shannon 


Johnson. Trudy L. 


Rocky Mount 


Johnston. Cheryl A. 


Kitty Hunk 


Johnslon. Jena J. 


Fayetteville 


Johnston, [o 


Rocky Mount 


Jones, Cranford A. 


( Ireensbnro 


Jones, Helen C. 


Raleigh 


[ones, Jennifer I. 


Vance boro 


Jones, Melvin T. 


Raleigh 


Jones. Patricia A. 


Whitevilie 


Jones, Stephen C, 


Gary 


Jones, Vickie S. 


Williamslon 


Jordan, I.inda C. 


Clinton 


Joyner, Alice D. 


Oak City 


Kalameja, A. James 


Buffalo. N Y. 


Kalz. Rhona M. 


ArJington, Va. 


Keanon, John R. 


Manassas, Va. 


Keel, PatriciaG. 


Robersonville 


Keistler, Joej 1. 


Charlotte 


Keith, Rebecca A, 


Kinston 


Kelly, Madolin R 


Durham 


Kennedy. Mary C. 


Winston-Salem 


Kennington, Dehra A. 


Wilmington 


Kesler, Laura H 


Greenville 


Keys, Robert C, 


Washington 


King, |ohn B 


Durham 


Kirby, Clifton W 


Lucama 


Kirby, Harryette C 


Charlotte 


Kirby, Karen S. 


Winston-Salem 


Knoll. Craig R. 


Raleigh 


Knoll. AK is I. 


Raleigh 


Kolody, Clarinda 


Fayetteville 


Kornegay, Eric K. 


Smithfield 


Kupke, Kathryn A 


Hickory 


Kuzmuk. Kim G. 


Washington. D. C. 


Kyle, James 1 1. 


Fayetteville 


LaGarde, Denise L. 


Raleigh 


Lamm. Marianna P. 


Lucama 


Lamphier. Deborah S. 


Fayetteville 


Lancasler. Dixie G. 


Vanceboro 


Lancaster, Gary O. 


Wilmington 


Langley, Georgia A 


Rocky Mount 


Lau. Nancy C. 


Rockville, Md. 


Lawson, Donna J. 


Eden 


Lee. Franky S 


Hum/lion 


Lee, Melissa J. 


Cailhersburg. Md. 


Lewis, Elizabeth A. 


Chocoivinity 


Lewis. James M. 


Hertford 


Lewis, Mary F. 


Elon 


Lieberman, Larry W. 


Charlotte 


Linthii urn. Wayland II 


Charlotte 


Lipke.C Neal 


Wooclbricl^e. Va. 


Lisane, Palmer L 


Rose Hill 


Little, Marx P 


Farmville 




lOfi Sophomor 




VI 





Lockamy. Sara E. 


Burlington 


Lockemy, Randall T. 


Henderson 


Lock wood, Mark E 


Charlotte 


Loflin, Donna W. 


Ayden 


Loftin. Palsy A. 


Ayden 


Long. Susan M. 


Elizabeth City 


Looman. Richard G. 


Greensboro 


Loudon. Maria A, 


Sidney, N. Y. 


Lowder. Debra F, 


Winston-Salem 


Lucas, Mar} I 


Plymouth 


Lucas, Terry L. 


Asheboro 


Lukaweez, Deborah A. 


Jacksonville 


Lynch, Kenneth S 


Westwood, N. J. 


Lyon, Barbara ] 


Whitakers 


Mann. Deborah L. 


Durham 


Manning. Lena F. 


Greenville 


Manning, Terrs L. 


Greenville 


Mansfield. Carolyn 


Goldsboro 


Marcellus, Candace S. 


Gloversville, N. Y. 


Marion. Martha A. 


Rocky Mount 


Marion. Sharvn E. 


Charlotte 


Marshburn. Anna L. 


RockyMount 


Martin. Stephen A. 


Lutherville, Md. 


Massey. Louis C. 


Eureka 


Matthews. David C 


Burlington 


Matthews, Donna | 


Matthews 


Matthews, PaulG. 


Sanford 


Mattson, Cynthis M. 


Newport 


Maxik. Marie M. 


Havelock 


May, Mary C. 


Charlotte 


Mayo, Deborah |. 


Selma 


McAdams, Luanne C. 


Mebane 


McAllister. Susan G. 


Cornelius 


McCarthy. Arlyne J. 


Falls Church, Va. 


McClelland. Lloyd C. 


Snow Camp 


McCollum.Hollon W..1 


Reidsville 


McCombs. Melinda P 


Greenville 


McCormack. Doug P. 


Durham 


McCrae. Deborah G. 


Durhum 


McCrimmon, Alfred E 


Vass 


McDonald. Donna E. 


Sylva 


McDonald, Gale M 


Pfafftown 


McDonald, Rodnej F. 


Durhum 


McKinney, Luther K. 


Burlington 


McLawhorn, ]ohn D.. II 


Cary 


McLellan, Georgina A. 


Denville. N. J. 


McLendon, 1. Elaine 


Fayetlevi/le 


McNeill. Waller D . |r 


Rocky Mount 


McNulty. Minn C. 


Greensboro 


McPhail. Barbra A 


Lexington 


McPhail. Lonnie I 


Aulryville 


McPhaller, Alvin R 


Sanfortl 


McQuaid, Thomas H. 


Beaufort 


McQueen, |ll(l\ C. 


EUerbe 


McRae. |ane M. 


Rowland 


McVeigh, Margaret A. 


Wilson 



Sophon 



Melcher, Becky 


Fayetteville 


Melton.Nancy | 


Lumberlon 


Melton. Roberl P. 


Richlands 


Mells. Maria P 


Jacksonville 


Mercer. Trej 


Wilson 


Meredith, Millie II 


Wilmington, Del. 


Merrell, Paula C. 


Beaufort 


Metzger, Debra 1, 


Greensboro 


Meyers, Louis J. 


Durham 


Miller. Gretchen B 


Beulaville 


Miller, Harrj D. 


New London 


Miller. Penny A. 


Gastonia 


Mills, Carolyn L 


Greenville 


Mills. Patsy 


GoJdsboro 


Mills, PaulaL 


Tabor City 


Minges.Libby B. 


Fayetteville 


Minshew, Paul M. 


O-Fallon, III 


Minzenmayer, Niki 1 


Canton 


Mitchell, l.ynne M. 


-Alexandria. V'u 


Mizell.GlendaK. 


Windsor 


Mizelle, William II.. 


i Williamston 


Modlin, Anna E 


Beaufort 


Modlin, Susan S 


Wushinglon 


Moffett, Debbie 


Wenonah, N. ]. 


Monroe. Randy W. 


Kagle Springs 


Moore.Martha II 


Newton Grove 


Moore, Jeanne R. 


Farmville 


Moore, Marj Louise 


Newton Grove 


Moore, Vivian E. 


Kinston 


Mucin. Debra ). 


Boxboro 


Morse. Barbara f. 


Rockingham 


M iler. Larry G. 


Washington 


Mulkey, Amelia P, 


Farmville 


Myers. Sails E. 


Washington 


Myers, Valerie 


Jamesville 


Myhrum. Karen S 


Jacksonville 


Nalley, Christie M. 


Raleigh 


Natella. Garj S. 


New Bern 


Natrella, Steven P 


Arlington, Vu. 


Nelson. Charlotte V. 


Beaufort 


Nelson, Elizabeth C. 


Charlotte 


Nelson. Glenn R 


Durham 


Nicholson. Dallas S. 


Con, Iler 


Noble, Audrey K 


Deep Run 


Noble. Sherry A, 


DeepRun 


Norfolk, Craig P. 


Greenville 


Norm, in. 1 1 P., [r. 


Farmville 


North. Gary I. 


Charlottesville. Vu 


Nowosielski. Cynthii 


A. Manville, N J. 


O'Boyle. Irene R. 


Charlotte 


O'Connor, James E., 


r. Kuvelock 


O'Neal. David D. 


Clayton 


O'Shea, Kevin R. 


Lancaster. Pa. 


i Idette, Roberl I. 


Raleigh 


Oliver. Teresa J. 


Raleigh 


i (utlaw, Ernestine E. 


Colerain 




iiik Sophomores 




Overcash. Barbara C 




Kannapolis 


( (wens, Douglas L. 




Albemarle 


Parker, Margarel A, 


Rounoke Rapids 


Parks, |err\ 1. 




Edenton 


Parks, Roberl I. 




Gastonia 


Parrish. Beverl\ A. 




Clayton 


Parrish. Michael E 




Durhurn 


Parson, Leslie G 


Bethesda, Md. 


Patrick, Christine I. 




Rockingham 


Patterson, Cai 1 1, 




Kannapolis 


P rson, Rachel L, 




Furmville 


P, rson.Roslyn D, 




Kinston 


P rson. Victoria C. 




Raleigh 


Paul.Melba R. 




( Iriental 


Peace, Pratt A 




Henderson 


Peacock. Judith L 


Alexandria, Va 


Peaden.LinwoodE., |r. 




Falkland 


Peedin.Larn W. 




Selma 


Peele TedW 




Kdenlon 


Pennington, LaDonna 1) 




Albemarle 


Pern. Be nil, i | 




Edenton 


Perry. Charles D 


u 


nston-Salem 


Pern. Hell,, 1 




Kittj Hunk 


Perr\, |uliaG 




Merry Hill 


Peterson. LindaS. 




Jacksonville 


Petterson, LynneM. 




< Ireem ille 


Petty. Roberl K 


Oi 


■ensboro, K\ 


Phelps. AnnM 




Hubert 


Phelps, Vickie L 




Greenville 


Phillips. CarlaE 




Greenville 


Phillips, Garj U 




Spencer 


Phlhisie. P Ann 




Edenton 


Pierce. Danm C. 




Princeton 


Pier<:\. Robert M 




IVulluee 


Pike. I„irr\ 1, 




Trenton 


Pittman, Angela K 




Kinston 


Pittman, Sus.m 1) 




Newport 


Plasler. Louise A. 


u 


inston-Salem 


Plazak. Marti 




Laurel, Md 


Pollard. Susan E. 




Durham 


Pomeroy, Robin P. 


Chf 


rryHiil, .V / 


Pond. Samuel B 


Sp 


nnntield. Va 


Porter, Katherine 1, 




Durham 


Post, Roxanne E. 




Charlotte 


Powell. Burwell D. 




Warrenton 


Powell, Eugene 1 1 




Gibson 


Powell. Georgia A. 




Greenville 


Powell. Ruth E. 




i Jreensboro 


Pm ner, Catherine A 




Moj ock 


Price, Gar\ 




Chapel Hill 


Price, RogerG 




Four Oaks 


Prnl, ly, Bets\ R 




Sandy Ridge 


Pnn,-, Barbaras 


R 


ichmund. Va. 


Pro. o, Joyce 1 




Durham 


Proctor, R,,n. ,1,1 F 




Fayetteville 


Provost, Paul M, 




Havelock 



Sophomores 109 



ugh, Barbai .1 ( !, 


Raleigh 


Jualls, Barbara | 


Camp Le/eune 


juinn, Bronnie L. 


Trenton 


.aines, Donna J. 


Clayton 


laines, Donald B. 


Princeton 


tambo, |ohnW. 


Charlotte 


amey, Jean C. 


Greenville 


atledge, Nancy |, 


Greensboro 


ay, Linda S. 


Mebane 


aybin, facqueline P. 


Chapel Hill 


ayford, Blanch R. 


Greenville 


eddy, Brigid E, 


Cherry Point 


eene, Charles P.. Jr. 


Wildesboro 


eece, Milzi D. 


New Bern 


eed, Jo Anne 


Pinetops 


eep, Roxanne C. 


Charlotte 


egan. Duncan C. 


Oxford 


eid, Beverlj | 


Raleigh 


epass, Brenda G. 


Jacksonville 


ich.DanaD 


Wallace 


ichards, Nancy M. 


Richmond, Va. 


ichardson, Patrick L, 


Siler City 


ichardson, Rebecca R. 


Lake Waccamaw 


icks.Keilh H 


Conway 


ingler. Marjorie A 


Jacksonville 


ipper. Eric G. 


Arlington, Va. 


ivenbark, Linda D, 


Wallace 


ivens. Robbie D. 


Davidson 


obbins. Cynthia V. 


EJizabethtown 


oberts. Martha A, 


Pittsboro 


oehuck. Denise G. 


Greenville 


ogers. Donna 1, 


Candler 


ogers. Roy W. 


VV'illiamston 


ogerson. )oan C. 


Williamston 


ollins. Julia A. 


Smithfield 


omer. Karen L. 


Silver Spring. Md. 


OSe, Martha J 


Newton Grove 


osenberg. David P. 


Reston. Va. 


ussell, Patricia G. 


Sanlord 


van, David B, 


Wmterville 


yherd, Rhonda L. 


Charlotte 


adak. Buddy F, 


Middleburg, Va. 



aitla. Daria M. Blauvelt. N. Y. 

alter. Elwood L. Havelock 
ampson, Kathyrn J. L'pper Marlboro. Md. 

anderford. Susan M. Chapel Hill 

asser. Sharon L Goldsboro 

aunders.Marj Jo Greenville 

aunders. Nanc\ S. Butner 



aunders, Rosemary L. 


Rocky Mount 


azama, Robin K. 


RockyMount 


chaffer, Debbie L 


Jacksonville 


chenck, Mary Ellen 


Canton 


chlosser. Gail 


Sparta. N. ]. 


eaman. James B 


Jacksonville 


eaton, Alyce B. 


Elizabeth City 




1 It) Sophomores 




Shackleford, Scott L. 


Fayetteville 


Shain. Joyce E. 


Lumberton 


Shallcross, John S. 


Smith/ield 


Shannon, George W.. |r 


Laurinburg 


Sharp, Willis D, 


Wilson 


Sharpe, Carol E. 


Clemmons 


Sharpe, Rhonda G. 


Bur/ington 


Shaw, Meredith C, 


Carney's Pt.. N. } 


Sheehan, Kathleen A. 


Parris Island, S. C. 


Sheek. Camilla D 


Clemmons 


Shell, |eannie 


Roanoke Rapids 


Shelton. |ohn A. 


Winston-Salem 


Shivers. Karen E. 


Raleigh 


Short, Bobby J. 


Hickory 


Sibley, L. Bryan 


Veil Be; n 


Simonds, Tom 


Rockviiie. Md. 


Skelly, Frances M. 


Washington. D. C. 


Slavin. Teresa L. 


Rocky Mount 


Smiley. Linda S. 


Ormond Beach. Flo 


Smith. Betty |. 


Wilmington 


Smith. Beverly J. 


IVinterville 


Smith, Cynthia M 


Griffon 


Smith. |anelC, 


Princeton 


Smith. Leonard J. 


HosrliMI M 


Smith. Mary D. 


Chocowinity 


Smith. Melissa D. 


Walnut Cove 


Smith. Miranda P. 


Greenville 


Smith. Samuel F. 


Kmgslree. S, C. 


Smith. Stephen R. 


Winston-Salem 


Smith. William C, 


Carolina Beach 


Smithson. Lawrence D 


Aldie. Va. 


Smilhwick. Nancy C. 


Windsor 


Soles, Michael W. 


Durham 


Speight, Charlie R. 


Greenville 


Speller. Nancy L. 


Williomston 


Spence. Deborah C. 


Rulherfordton 


Spiegel. Edward F. 


West Nyack, N. Y. 


Spires. Linda W. 


Greenville 


Sprecher, Geri J. 


Charlotte 


Spruill, William M., Jr. 


Cresu'e II 


Starling. Virginia C. 


Lancaster, Pa. 


Stefureac, Susan M. 


Raleigh 


Stephens, Cecil W. 


Raleigh 


Stephens. Jan M. 


Lillington 


Stephenson, Eleanor K 


Clayton 


Stewart, Bert 


Fayetteville 


Stewart, Carolyn C. 


Winston-Salem 


Stewart, [ulianne 


Smithfield 


Stewart. Ronald C. 


Jacksonville 


Still. Susan E, 


Greenville 


Stocks. Donna M. 


Kinstnn 


Stone. Gary F. 


Salisbury 


Strain, [oeann 


Hubert 



Stravinskas. Laura A, Wiltempstead. N. V 
Strayhorn. Kenneth E. Havelock 

Strohofer. Cynthia M. Spring/ield, Pa 



Sophomores 111 



Summerlin, Elizabeth 1 '. 


Alexandria. Va. 


Sumner. Nancy E. 


Washington 


Sutherland, Blanche R, 


Laurinburg 


Sutton, Deborah 


Greenville 


Tart, LindaS. 


Coats 


Tatum, Karen L. 


Winston-Salem 


Tayloe, Frank W. 


Aulander 


Taylor, Debra Y. 


Kinslon 


Taylor. Diane 


Golds boro 


Taylor, Lynn L. 


Rocky Mount 


Templeton, Michael IS 


Raleigh 


Taylor, Martha J. 


Tarboro 


Taylor, Thomas D. 


Greenville 


Teel, Doris M. 


Farmville 


Teer. Marion L. 


Durham 


Tesh, Patrick A. 


Midway Park 


Tew . Margarel K 


Williamston 


Theodore, Andrew S. 


Linwood. N. J. 


Thigpen, Sj K ia | 


Beaulaville 


Thomas, Sheila K. 


CJayton 


Thompson, Michael L. 


Rocky Mount 


Thompson, Pamela | 


Wilmington 


Thornton, Chris D, 


Havelock 


Thornton, Thaddeus N. 


Four Oaks 


Tiedje. John N. 


Charlotte 


Tise. Allan 1!. 


Winston-Salem 


Todd, Karen K. 


Fayetlei ille 


Toler. Ben F. 


Rocky Mount 


Tripp, Angela G 


Raleigh 


Tripp, Charlotte R 


Greenville 


Trull, Deborah [, 


Martinsville, Va. 


Tucker, Margaret | 


Fayelleville 


Tufo. Jean M, 


Vienna, Va. 


Turlington, Neale N. 


Clinton 


Turner, Cheryl |. 


Tarboro 


Turner, Kenneth B, 


Fayetteviile 


Turner, Vickie |. 


Clemmons 


Tuttle. Teresa 1, 


High Point 


Tyler, Charles R. 


Winston-Salem 


Tyndall, Michael T 


Arapahoe 


1 Fpchurch, Glenda S. 


Lillington 


VanGundy. Robert D. 


Charlotte 


Van Horn. Leslie 


Winston-Salem 


Van Hoy. Sharon M. 


Winston-Salem 


Vallerj . Chris E. 


Fayetteviile 


Vance, Zelma 


Charlotte 


VandeWalle, Suzanne 


Richmond, Va. 


Vaughn, Robin 1' 


Winston-Salem 


Vick. Philip IS 


Alorehead City 


Vickers, |errj U 


Elm City 


Vreeland, Karen E. 


Winston-Salem 


Wagstaff, lames T., Jr. 


Ayden 


Walker, Rhonda L. 


Wew Bern 


Ware, Marj R 


Toano. Va. 


Warren, Janice \l 


Kins ton 


Warren, Lewis 1. 


Fayetteviile 




112 Sophomores 




Waters. Deborah L. 


Silver Spring, Md 


Watkins. Larr\ G. 


Rock) Mount 


Watkins, William |. 


Clemmons 


Webb. Billie D. 


Pinetops 


Wnbb, Margie | 


Garner 


Weeks, Vickie I) 


Rock) Mount 


Welton, Roberl 1. 


Annandaie, Va. 


West. Marsha E, 


Fayetfe\ tile 


West. Susan E. 


Wilmington 


Weston, Billie T 


( Jreem ille 


Wetherington. )uililh I. 


KinsU)n 


Whisenhunt, Jackie E 


Beaufort 


Whitaker. Carolyn L. 


U indsor 


White, Stephen F 


Windsor 


White. Wilton A. 


Windsor 


Whitehurst. Anita R 


.VetV He/ n 


Whitely. James C. 


famestow n 


Whilsell. Dwighl I. 


McLeans; ille 


Whiteside, Man M. 


.You Bern 


Whitlark, Richard O 


Mai • lesfield 


Whitley. Phyllis A 


Raleigh 


Whitne. Phyllis E. 


Washington 


Whitten. Bruce M. 


1 lenderson 


Wilder. Sammie J. 


Raleigh 


Wilhoit, Gan F. 


Albemarle 


Wilkinson. Lee A. 


Wilmington, Dei 


Williams. Cathy E. 


/ lenderson 


Williams, Clarence R. 


Whiteville 


Williams. Jacqueline 


Charlotte 


Williams, James S. 


Jacksonville 


Williams. JaneG 


Rock) Mount 


Williams, Mary S. 


Asheboro 


Williams. Stevens C. 


Greem ill*- 


Williams. William T. 


Rocky Mount 


Willis, WilliamS . |r. 


McGuireAFB, \ / 


Wilson, Cathy M. 


Greem ille 


Wilson. Keith G. 


U'u/kertoun 


Wilson, Monte L. 


Klllrrlt 


Wilson, Sheila | 


Winston-Salem 


Wilson, Susan C. 


(Corner 


Winbourne. Larry T. 


U ilson 


Wini h. |oanne M 


Wilmington 


Windham. Jennifer L 


Wilson 


Winstead. Mary P. 


Macclesfield 


Winslead.Merlyne D 


Rougemont 


Winters, Man 


U alkerlon 


Witt.MadelynF 


Boone 


Wood. Carlo A 


Jacksom ille 


Woodard. Helena 


Sharpsburtj 


Woodley. |ane M. 


Cresuell 


Woods. JohnS. 


Enid, tiklu 


Woolard. Betty A 


Beaufort 


Woolard. Marshall N. 


Washington 


Worley. Ron L 


Fayetteville 


Worsley, Earl M 


Bethel 


Wrenn, Barrj 1) 


Greem ille 



Sophon 



'right. |ohn M. 




Goldsboro 


fright, Pamela K 


Ri 


tanoke Rapids 


'ruck, ErnesI R 


Bro. 


dkhaven, N V. 


'ulzj n. William M 




Burgavv 


fynn, Debra L, 




W/lliamston 


arboro, Pamela | 




Roxboro 


oungblood, Peggy A. 

ork, Leta i, 
ayton.Kellj 1 




Albemarle 

Randleman 
New Bern 



dams.GloriaE 




Newton 


dcock, Jennifer I. 




Wilmington 


kers, Mary P. 


Roanoke Rapids 


11mm. Eleanor A 




Raleigh 


llgood. Susan S. 




7'arliMro 


man, William D 




Swansboro 


mbrnse. Beverly G. 




Aulunder 


nderson, Linda K 




/amesloivn 


nderson, Ronnie | 




( foldsboro 


nst'll, |ean A, 


W> 


nston-Salem 


nselmo, Sandra F. 




Jacksonville 


rmslrong, William 11 1 


Gaith 


2rsburg, Md. 


mold. Ginger L, 


Rocky Mount 


rnv. Michael I.. 


Springfield. V'a. 


shley, ElbertG 




Durham 


skew, Martin L. 




Kinston 


Ima. Virginia L. 




Charlotte 


very, Katherine M 




Greenville 


vingei . Rand\ A, 




Graham 


\ ers, Annette 




Raleigh 


aker. Calhy |. 




Charlotte 


aker, Delia E 




Fayetteville 


aldwin, Barbara A 




Wilmington 


allance, Naomi M. 




Selma 


arbour, Debra L 




Raleigh 


arefoot, |anel I. 




Clinton 


arfield, Marcia J. 




Merry Hilt 


arham, Marcia R. 




Rolesville 


arham, Pati icia I. 


Roanoke Rapids 


arker. Sandra U 




Graham 


arnhill, Benjamin T, 


Ro 


bernsonville 


arnwell, Belinda G. 


Lang 


ley AFB, V'a. 


arrett, Janet G 




New Bern 



&fi? «& 




Freshmen 




&PI 




114 Freshmen 




Barren. |udyF. 




New Bern 


Bartholomew, Brenda 


L. 


Veil Her n 


Bass. Marilyn M. 




Kernersville 


Batchelor. Dianna |. 




Fayetteville 


Batten, Herbert C. 




Roxbora 


Beaman, William A. 




Furmville 


Bean, Vernon J. 


W 


nston-Salem 


Beauxhaine, Stephani 


eR. 


Raleigh 


Beddard. Lindsey V. 




Greenville 


Bell. Phyllis E. 




Faison 


Bell. Tern J. 


M 


orehead City 


Bender. Wade H. 




Pollocksville 


Benge. Patricia E. 




Lenoir 


Bennett, Dorothy W. 




Rich Square 


Bennett. Elizabeth A. 


Somers Point. \ J 


Bennett. John J. 


Winston-Salem 


Bennett. JoyC. 




Ash 


Benson, Glenda M. 




Deep Run 


Best, Pamela K, 




Fayetteville 


Belton.Gail 


Millsboro, Del. 


Bird, Thomas M. 


Murfreesboro 


Birdwell. Milton L. 




Dudley 


Bishop. Dana C, 


Fall 


Church, Va. 


Bivens. Cheryl L. 




High Point 


Blackmon, Wanda K. 




Fayetteville 


Blizzard, Valerie E. 




Charlotte 


Blount. Brian C. 




Raleigh 


Boardway. Nancy L. 


With 


iv Grove, Pa. 


Bobo. Willie F. 




Wake Forest 


Boykin. Wanda |. 




Selma 


Boham. Kenneth A. 




Jackson 


Bolick, Sheila L. 




Granite Falls 


Boone. Deborah L. 




Canton 


Boone, James H. 




Stokes 


Boose, Michael C. 




Fayetteville 


Bost, DebraL. 




Durham 


Boyce, Lisa C. 




Charlotte 


Boyles, Mary C. 




Gibsonville 


Bramar, David G. 




Fayetteville 


Brammer. Cynthia A. 




Reidsville 


Branch, (esse A., Ill 




Winterville 


Brannan. Stephen W. 




Greensboro 


Brantley. Melissa A. 




Jacksonville 


Brantly, Robert E, 


Willow Grove. Pa. 


Braswell. Don D, 




Fu\ ellel llle 


Braswell.KimberlyL. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Braxton. Toni A. 




Creedmoor 


Bray, Ann L. 




Semora 


Brett. lellaD. 




Ahoskie 


Brewer. Sarah ]. 




Wilson 


Brewer, Sherran I. 


Winston-Salem 


Brill, Man K. 


N 


ewton Grove 


Brock, Teresa E. 




Cary 


Browder, Michael D. 


W 


nston-Salem 


Brown, [effery V. 




k'mston 


Brown. Lee 


I lendersonville 



Freshmen 135 



Burroughs, Deborah 1. 


Edenton 


Bushing, Stephen R 


Pitman. N. J. 


Butler.Kaj I 


Krvvin 


Byrd, David K 


Raleigh 


Byrd, Nancy E, 


Ahoskie 


Caddell. Melda G 


Carthage 


Calder, Mark C. 


Ahoskie 


Cameron, Cheri A. 


Winston-Salem 


Campbell, Kenneth 


Whiteville 


Campbell, Pamela C. 


Ossining, N. V. 


Canady, Judith E. 


Cluylon 


Cannady, |ohn 1) 


Poweilsville 


Cannady, Terry L. 


Dunn 


Cannon, Linda L. 


WinterviJie 


Cannon, Ramona J, 


Greenville 


Capps. Maril) n | 


Micro 


Carmack. Judy 1) 


Belhel 


Carpenter. Eloise G. 


Durham 


Carter. Mary C. 


Raleigh 


Case.Tracey S. 


Haleigh 


Cassedy, Gary R. 


Wilmington, Del. 


Cayton, Teresa D. 


Greenville 


Chadwick, Edward D 


Charleston. S. C. 


Brown, Dehra A 


Kinston 


Brown, H Thomas 111 


t IreenviJJe 


Brown. Jimmie 


Hillsborough 


Brown, Linwood O. 


Stokes 


Brown, Wanda |. 


ouk <;jt\ 


Brumbies, Billj 1). 


Orrum 


Bryan, Carol D. 


Broadway 


Bryant, DebraL. 


Burlington 


Bryant, [ames P 


Fa\ rile l lllr 


Bryant, Mary L. 


Havelock 


Burch, [udith A 


Fayetteville 


Bj rum. Sheila 1.. 


Edenton 


Buchanon, Larry | 


Belmont 


Bulla. Keith P. 


Midway Park 


Bullock, Cynthia | 


Durham 


Bullock, ReginaG 


Hichmond, Va. 


Bunch. Rebecca 


Edenton 


Bundy, Michael B. 


Williamston 


Bunn. DolanR. 


Tarboro 


Bunn, Donnie L. 


Rocky Mount 


Bunting, Flo D. 


Scotland Neck 


Burch, Barbara B. 


Annandale, Va. 


Burden, Anthony C. 


Raleigh 


Burgess. Thomas T, 


Silver Spring, Md. 


Chalkey, Louise R. 


Jacksonville 


Chambers. Wallace A 


Durhum 


Chandler. Cynthia A. 


Raleigh 


Chandler, Suzanne E, 


Matthews 


Charlton. William H. 


GoJdsboro 


Charlton, Katherine A. 


Fayetteville 


Cherrix, Carol A. 


Salisbury. Md. 


( Iherry, Charlotte A. 


Mooresville 


Chens, Edward M. 


Windsor 





Chesnult, Sylvia G. 


Roseboro 


Chesson, Debra S. 


Roper 


Childers, Nelda F 


Raleigh 


Chrislley. Vickie L. 


Ruffin 


Chu.Paul 


ChapeJHili 


Ciesla, David J. 


Raleigh 


Clark, Linda A 


Chesapeuke. Va. 


Clarke, [ames A. 


Asheville 


Clayton. Sheilah K 


Timberlake 


Clement, Rebl :.i |, 


Sneads Ferry 


Clifton, Julia E, 


Eden 


Clontz. Wanda S. 


Morganlon 


Cobb. Carl G. 


Charlolte 


Cobb, Joan A. 


Greenville 


Colcord, Christine 1. 


Greenville 


Coleman, Robert E., |i 


Lillington 


Collier, Samuel I-! 


Goldsboro 


Collins. Paula A. 


Winston-Salem 


Combs. Sherman ] 


Greensboro 


Conger. Catherine A 


Falls Church. Vu 


Congleton, Dan 1) 


Stokes 


Conoly.GailF. 


Raeford 


Cook. David E., |r. 


Tabor City 


Cook. Deborah T 


Wendell 


Coonev. Carolyn A, 


Virginia Beach. Va 


Cooper. Lois F. 


Columluu 


Cooper. \1\ ra D 


Wake Forest 


Coppage, [an C. 


Enfield 


Cotton. Brenda S 


.\'eu' Bern 


Cotton. Russell I) 


Rocky Mount 


Coril. [udy An 


Shailotte 


Cowart. Cathy L. 


Jucksonville 


Cox. Eleanor A. 


Durhum 


Cox, |err\ W. 


Wintervi'fle 


Cox, Marilyn D. 


Greenville 


Cox. Randolph G. 


Fleosanl ( Jarden 


Cox. Tricia D. 


Chocowinity 


Coyle, Patricia C. 


Rocky Mount 


Craddock, Constance L. 


Spring /lope 


Craig, 1 lei man \1 


Gasloma 


Crawford. Frances A. 


Burlington 


Cr :h, David A. 


Smithfield 


Creech, Harold E 


Durhum 


Creech, Walter R 


Wilson 


Crisp, I, addie M , |r 


Rock) Mount 


Crissman. Bon 1. 


Broadway 


Crocker. Lara \ C 


Ml Mine 


Cromer, Robin L. 


King 


Crown, Audrej 1. 


Washington. D C 


Clumpier. Wanda P. 


Dunn 


Cuddington, Levi ' I 


Kenlj 


Curliss. Carole R 


Elizabeth Ciij 


Dad. Nancy E. 


Willard 


Daily, Thomas R. 


Fayetteville 


Dameron, Cathy L. 


Burlington 


Dando, William T 


Alexandria, Va 



Daniel. Otho A.. Ill 
Daniel, Richard A, 
Daniels, Charles E. 
Daniels, Dorothj L. 

Daniels, [, I, 
Daughlry. Dorolhy J. 
Davenport, Jewel Y. 

Davenport, Willbui C, II) 

Davis. Alice V. 
Davis, Anila E. 
Davis. |ohn H. 
Davis. |uli, i A, 



Davi 
Davi 



,Richa 

. Wilm 



d I 



Day, Dorothj |. 
Dean, Dorothj D. 
Dean. Katherine B. 
Dean. Mary B. 
Delamar, Mary A. 
Deloatch, |ames M 
DelPapa, Susan C. 

Deanning, Da\ id I. 

Denning, Marc S. 
DeNunzio. Lois M. 
DeRolf.Rnlieil S 
DeSio, Neil 
Delvin, Maria E. 
De Vries, Hollj E. 

Dews, Madge G. 

Dickens. Charles D, 
Dickens, Thomas B. 
Dickie, Robert S. 
Dickinson, Julie K 
DiGiulio, Joseph M. 
Dingman, Henrj 

Dixon. Diane J. 
Dolan, William M. 
Dominick. Christine r 
Doub, Randj D. 
Doughtie, Beverly L. 
Driver. Gwendolyn C 
Dudley, Frances C. 

Dudley, Patricia K. 

Dungan. Michael |. 
Dunn. Amy D. 
Dunn, Donald G. 
Dupree, Elizabeth K. 
Durham. |oseph K. 
Dwulet, Barbara A. 

Eatmon, Golden 
Edwards. Carol A. 
Edwards, David G 
Edwards, Jennifer C. 
Edwards, Keith A. 
Edwards, Patricia D 
Edwards, Stan E 



Winston-Salem 

Old Fori 

Beaufort 

New Bern 

Goldsboro 

Goldsboro 

Kinston 

Plymouth 

Wilson 

Erwin 

Windsor 

Kinston 

Winston-Salem 

Conway 

Rockville 
Wake Forest 
Kinston 
McLean 
Garner 
Roanoke Rapids 
Kinston 



Dunn 

Cary 

Oakton 

Jacksonville 

New Bern 

Virginia Beach. Va. 

Wilmington 

Winlerville 

Wilson 

Rocky Mount 

Verona 

Charlotte 

Havelock 

Fayetteville 

llendersonville 

Greensboro 

Raleigh 

Pfafftoivn 

Rounoke Rapids 

Durham 

Greenville 

Durham 

Chadbourn 

Selma 

Fayetteville 

Angler 

Piltsboro 

Lakeivood 

Wilson 
New Bern 
Rocky Mt. 
Four Oaks 
Havelock 
Chocowinity 
Liberty 




118 Freshmen 




Edwards. Terria D. 


Selmc 


Edwards, WorleyT. 


Clarklor 


Eller, Charles E. 


Bowie. Mo 


Elliot, Jonathan H. 


Fayettevilli 


Englesby, Brenda J. 


Faj ette\ ill' 


Ennis, Nancy L. 


Game 


Etheridge, [ill V 


Raleigr 


Etter, Kathleen A. 


Virginia Beach, Va 


Eure, Shirlej P. 


Eurf 


Evanovich, David 


Burgavi 


Evans, Carolyn R. 


Rounoke Rapid 


Evans, Debra L. 


Skylanc 


Evans. KathyO. 


Roxborc 


Evans, Kevin T. 


Laurinburj; 


Evans, Phileria A. 


Williumstor 


Everette, Anthony R. 


Wilson 


Eversole, Catherine L. 


Jacksonville 


Ezzell, Frances K. 


Mount Olive 


Faison. Helen L. 


Littleton 


Fales. Deborah I.. 


Wilmington 


Falter, Wendy M. 


Rocky Moun 


Faser. Karen E. 


Greenville 


Faulconer, Cynthia R 


Greensboro 


Fousl. Kathj 1. 


Murrysville. Pa 


Fehrs. Robert |. 


New Bern 


Fentress. Mary E. 


Bayborn 


Fetchko, Michael E. 


Warren, N. j 


Felner. |ane E. 


Hamle 


Fields, David M 


Greensboro 


File. Nancy I) 


Salisbury 


Fish, Mary S. 


Charlotle 


Fisher. June A. 


Albemarle 


Fisher, Linda E. 


Rocky Mount 


Fisher, Pamela J. 


Wilmington 


Fitch. Teresa G. 


Durham 


Fitzgerald. EvelynS. 


Pine Level 


Flye, Richard I., |r. 


Henderson 


Flynn, Helen L. 


Chapel Hill 


Forbes. Robin K. 


Raleigh 


Fox, Susan R. 


Portsmouth, Va. 


Foy, Michael D. 


Roxboro 


Francis, Kathj I. 


Conway 


Frander. Doris I,. 


Fayetteville 


Franke. Annelle I,, 


Wintrrville 


Frazelle, Deborah L. 


Kenansville 


Frazier, Bridget K. 


Henderson 


Freeman. Suzanne M. 


Charlotte 


Freeze, Freda S. 


High Point 


French, Kenneth E 


Fayefteviile 


Fry. Barbara I. 


Fayetteville 


Fuller. Lana J. 


Newport 


Futch, Michael R 


Rose Hill 


Gaghan. Timothy S. 


Alexandria, Va 


Gaines, David S. 


Statesi ille 


Gainey, Connie D 


Clinton 


Gale. Chaucer L., Jr 


Salisbury 



Garner, Marvin E. 


Greenville 


Garren, Beverlj K 


Andrews 


Garrell. Michael G, 


Norlina 


Getsinger, Douglas B. 


Gohlsboro 


Gibbs. KayF. 


Engelhard 


Gilbert, Phillip L. 


Dunn 


Glass, Carter L, 


Newton Sq., Pa. 


Goad, Sam Ij K 


Winston-Salem 


Gooding. Michael F. 


Winterville 


Gordon. Robin 1' 


Goldsboro 


Gordon. Betty L. 


Pilot Mln. 


( rossett, Susan f. 


Charlotte 


Grainger, Bruce I. 


Asheville 


Grant, Warren D, 


Beaufort 


Grauel, Gregorj W, 


Sarasota. Fla. 


Gravley, [eannen I. 


Fayelteville 


Gravely, Susan |, 


Charlotte 


Gray, Earl Eugene, fr, 


Angier 


Gray, Gail L. 


Belcross 


Gruziosi. Gene S 


Glen Cove, N. V. 


Green, Melissa |. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Gregory, Robin S, 


Durham 


Gregory, Susan C. 


Wudesboro 


Greiner, Deborah E. 


Jacksonville 


Griffin. Marlica A. 


V'aldosta. Ga. 


Griffin, Rhonda C. 


Charlotte 


Grimes, Laura S, 


Swan Quurter 


Grimmett, Billj D , |r 


Richmond. Va. 


Gunderson, Neil R. 


Winston-Salem 


Gupton, David C 


Wilmington 


Gurkin, BrendaK. 


Wiliiamston 


Haggar. Nathaniel. |r. 


Newport News. Va. 


Haggerty, Dave B. 


Springfield, Va. 


Hahn. Maxwell G, 


Virginia Beach. Va. 


Halstead, Nancy S. 


Eumberton 


1 lammer, Delores L. 


Candler 


Hammond. Nancy |. 


Silver Spring, Md. 


Hardee. Miriam T. 


Sims 


Hardison, Deborah F. 


Plymouth 


1 lardy, Nancy L. 


Seven Springs 


Hargett, Sheila B. 


Fori Bragg 


Harloe, Karen E. 


Manchester, Mo. 


1 larlow, |ulie M. 


Raleigh 


Harman, Andrea L. 


Richmond. Va. 


1 [arper, |ane C. 


Kinston 


Hanell Berta II 


Scotland Neck 


Harrell, Cynthia L. 


Powellsville 


Harrell, Deborah ] 


fackson 


Harrell, Sheila K. 


Graham 


Harrill, [an A, 


Asheboro 


Harris, Deborah G. 


Rocky Mount 


Harris. Nancy C. 


Eden 


Harris, Steven M 


Winston-Salem 


Harris. in. Alia 1. 


I'h mouth 


Harrison. Paula | 


Hertford 


Harrison, I . i r i I. 


Enfield 





Hart. Charles A. 


Washington. D. C 


Hart, William D. 


Raleigh 


Hartman, Mary E. 


Washington. D. C. 


Hartlaub, Donald E. 


Woodbndge. Va. 


Hatch, Edwj G. 


Ml Olive 


Hatch, Mary A. 


Fuyettevil/e 


Hathaway, Jeffrey H. 


Fayetteviile 


Hayes, |ill E. 


Lumberlon 


Hayes. Nancy N. 


Willesboro 


Hearne, [an H 


Burlington 


Heelj . Nancj 1. 


Portsmouth, Va 


Helbig, [anet C 


Havelock 


Helsabeck. DawnE. 


Germany 


Hembree, Beverly K. 


Greenville, S C. 


Henderson, Jesse J. 


Wendell 


Henderson. Vanessa A. 


New Bern 


Hendren, Howard G. 


Lumberton 


Henley, Cynthia D. 


Richlands 


Herhin. |an M. 


Greensboro 


Hester, Wanda F. 


lluhn. (J'Tmuny 


Hewett, Gwenevere D. 


Tubor City 


Hickman, Nellie F. 


B/udenboro 


Higgins, Helen B. 


Durham 


Highl, Jeannelle E. 


Henderson 


Hill. Barbara A. 


Wilmington 


Hill, Gwendolyn S 


ReidsviJle 


Hill, MarjorieA. 


Alurfreesboro 


Hill. Teresa V. 


Eden 


Hines, Debra A. 


Jamestown 


Hinson. Brain M. 


Charlolte 


Hinlon, Jan C. 


Rock> Mount 


Hinton. Sonja D. 


Knightdale 


Hoar. Eric J. 


Hampstead 


Hobbs. Grace L. 


Rocky Mount 


Hobbs. Rebecca C. 


Tyner 


Hobarl. Teresa L. 


Sanford 


Hodges, Carolyn G. 


Williamston 


Hodges. Helen H. 


Washington 


Huff. Linda L. 


Goldsboro 


Holland. Teresa A. 


Garner 


Hollen, MaryK. 


Hialeah. Fla. 


Hollingsworth, Jane C. 


Jacksonville 


Holloman, Deborah A. 


LaGrange 


Hollander. Ian J. 


Richmond, \'a 


Hollon. Cynthia L. 


Henderson 


Hopper, Douglas VV. 


Matthews 


Home, Ruth 


BeulaviJJe 


Howard, Phillip F. 


Trenton 


Howard. Rebecca L 


Jacksonville 


Howell. Teresa | 


Murfreesboro 


Hubard. Virginia J 


RiMinnke. \ ii 


1 luckabee, Dora J. 


Wilmington 


Hudgins. Priscilla A. 


Lewisville 


Hughes, Norman J. 


Favelteville 


Humphrey. Dennis V. 


Brulavdle 


Humphrey. Terry W. 


Maysville 



Freshmen 121 



Hunnicutt, Sherree L. 


Winston-Salem 


Hunt. Cyndy S. 


Durham 


Hunt, Robert D ., Jr 


Frunklinton 


Hunter, Elizabeth H. 


Belmont 


Hurdle. Adrienne G. 


Elizabeth Cily 


Hutchisson, William R 


Rocky Mount 


Ireland. Wendy |. 


New Bern 


Isenhuur. Nancy E. 


Kannapolis 


Jackson, Brenda C 


Greenville 


jankson, James E.. Jr. 


Dunn 


Jackson. Rosemarie 


Nashville 


James, Melvin W. 


Bowden 


James, Michael R. 


Rocky Mount 


[arvis, Helga M. 


Sivan Quarter 


lelferson. Ethel L. 


Rocky Mount 


Jenkins, Kathy A. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Jenkins. Phyllis R. 


Bethel 


[ernigan. Jeffrey S. 


Dunn 


Jernigan, Stella T. 


Stantonsburg 


Jirva. Josephine H. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Johnson. Betsy A. 


Four Oaks 


Johnson, Cynthia R. 


Benson 


Johnson, Leslie V. 


Ridgevvav 


Johnson, Marcus W.. Jr. 


Ahoskie 


Johnson. Marion H. 


Fayetteville 


Johnson. Mona K 


Trenton 


Jones. C. Jane 


Durham 


Jones. Charles A. 


Raleigh 


|ones Daphne E. 


Alt Olive 


Jones, Dean II 


Jacksonville 


Jones, Freda H. 


Raleigh 


Jones, Mildred D. 


Halifax 


Jones, Patli A 


Jacksonville 


Jones. PauletteE. 


Maysvilie 


Joftes. Sandra K. 


Henderson 


Jones. Sharon K. 


Raleigh 


Jonges. Neil M, 


Winston-Salem 


Jordan, Donna P. 


Henderson 


Jordan, Julie K. 


Wilmington 


Joseph. Kelly R 


Benson 


Jovner, Gwendolvn M. 


Rocky Mount 


Jovner. JarvisD., 'jr. 


Farmville 


Jovner. Robert M. 


ltn< i,\ Mount 


Jovner. William T. 


Rocky Mount 


Kellas, Lance D 


Carmel. N V 


Kerr. Douglas S. 


Winston-Salem 


Key, Richard V. 


Winston-Salem 


Kincaid, [eff D. 


Goldsboro 


Kinton, Robin M, 


Fuquay-Varina 


Kinsland, GlyndaG, 


Knightdale 


Kirn, Nancy E. 


Richmond. Va. 


Klullz. Debra], 


Ml. Pleasant 


Kluttz.Tony L. 


Kannapolis 


Knowles, James D. 


Wilson 


Kopanski, David A. 


Fayetteville 


Kramer, Mary L. 


Elizabeth City 




122 Freshmen 




Krauss. Patricia |. 


Hendersonville 


Krieger, Kim S. 


Fayetteville 


Kurle. SheilaM. 


McLean, Va. 


Kwialkowski. Eileen M. 


Washington 


Lancaster. Susan E. 


Chesapeake, Va. 


Lane, Josephs., Jr. 


Chadbourn 


Lane. Linda C. 


BJylheviiie, Ark. 


Langston. Georgia E. 


Lillington 


Lenning. Tara D. 


Spcni it 


Larrimore. Vickie C. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Lassiter. Janice L. 


Columbia 


Lassiter. Paula W. 


Ahoskie 


Latham, Richard L. 


She/by 


Layden. Glenda C. 


Goidsboro 


Laylon. Charlotte A. 


Edenton 


Lee, DebraD. 


Mebane 


Lee. James H , Jr. 


Dudle>' 


Lee, Vicky A, 


Havelock 


Leith, Robert W., Jr. 


Greenville 


Levi, Kenneth A. 


Raleigh 


Lewallen, Wanda L. 


Havelock 


Liles. Junius H. 


Garland 


Lindley, William C. 


Raleigh 


Liverman, Addie D. 


Columbia 


Liverman. Susan M. 


Williamston 


Loeblein. Carolyn W. 


Salisbury 


Loman. Thomas 


Winston-Salem 


Long. Bettj ] 


Murfreesboro 


Long. Thomas A. 


Hampton. Va. 


Long well, Pamula |. 


Rocky Mount 


Lopez. Hilda C, 


Jamestown 


Lowery, Jane E. 


Spencer 


Lucas. Stanley E. 


Lucama 


Luciani. Barbara 


Northfield, N. ]. 


Lusk. Shelia C. 


Raleigh 


Lynch, Joyce M. 


Burlington 


Lyon, Terrie D. 


Northside 


MacKenzie, Patricia R, 


Roanoke Rapids 


Maready, Sandra E. 


Chiquapin 


Marion. Sharyn E. 


Charlotte 


Markie, Susan H. 


Portsmouth. Va. 


Marks. Pamela L. 


Jacksonville 


Marrow. Veronica Y, 


Knfield 


Marsh. Amy E, 


Hickory 


Marshburn. Charlotte A. 


Raleigh 


Marshlnirn, Ernest G. 


Burlington 


Martin, Brady A 


Woodsdale 


Martin. James M 


Jacksonville 


Martin. Martha A. 


Jacksonville 


Martin. William T. 


Winston-Salem 


Mason. Constance W. 


Morehead City 


Matthews. Barbara A 


Charlotte 


Matthews. Michael D, 


Lewisville 


Mayer, Jeffrey A. 


Villanovu. Pa 


Mayo, Jesse R. 


Aurora 


Mayo, Tracy A. 


Wilson 



Freshmen 123 



McAdams, Laurie A. 


Charlotte 


McAlister.Mary Beth 


Charlotte 


McAllister, JohnM. 


Lowell 


McCaffney, Michael P, 


Havelock 


McCain, Marilyn A. 


New Bern 


McClintock, Susan D. 


Kinston 


McCutcheon. Barbara I.. 


Ridge wood, N- ]. 


McDonald, Connie R, 


Albemarle 


McDuffie.MarvM 


Charlotte 


McEntire. Debra Y. 


Old Fort 


McFall, Laura A. 


Durham 


McKinley. Anne G. 


Morehead City 


McKinney, Donna R 


Marion 


McKinney, Maureen M. 


McLean, Va. 


McKinney. Valerie 1, 


Greenville 


McLaurin. Sean 11 


Springfield, Va 


McLeod. JohnT. 


Charlotte 


McMahon. Patricia L. 


Durham 


McManus. Terrie R. 


Midland 


McMillan, B.Carolyn 


Greensboro 


McNeill. Karen |. 


Sanford 


McNeill. Teresa], 


Sanford 


McQuaid, Marilyn R 


Beaufort 


McQueen. Linda M. 


Kllerbe 


McQuislon. Alan S, 


Annandale, Va. 


McRae, Janet L. 


Fayette viJJe 


McRnrie.Kalhy |. 


Raleigh 


Meachum, Ramona Y. 


Lilesville 


Meehon, Patricia A. 


Havelock 


Mellert. Thomas S. 


Durhum 


Melville, Alice A. 


Statesviile 


Merchant, Karen S. 


New Bern 


Merrill. Randy L. 


Burgaw 


Michael, Nancy E. 


Asheville 


Miguel, Beverly A. 


Fayetteville 


Miller. Cindy A. 


Ahoskie 


Miller. Gary W. 


Fayetteville 


Miller. Janet L. 


Albemarle 


Miller. Sara R. 


New Bern 


Miller, VickiS. 


Wilmington 


Millsaps, Karen E. 


Statesviile 


Mills, Randy S. 


Washington 


Mitchell, Fredric VV. 


Charlotte 


Mitchell. Luois C. 


Raleigh 


Moberg. Lynn A. 


Launnburg 


Modun, Larry T. 


/amesville 


Monds, Dennis C. 


Tyner 


Moore. Alice 1. 


Gary 


Moore, Dianne M. 


Roxboro 


Moore. Leslies. 


Winston-Salem 


Moore. Mary L. 


Lucama 


Moore, Nancy B. 


Wilson 


Moore, Renee A. 


Elizabeth City 


Moore. Tei ri L. 


Thomasville 


Morgan, Nancy F. 


Ellerbe 


Morin. Kenneth 1), 


Culm Bay. Fla. 




124 Freshmen 




Moritz, Carol A. 


Clinton 


Moser, David F. 


Winston-Salem 


Myers, Chrisline E. 


Fayettevilie 


Nachman, Deborah A. 


Vienna. Vu 


Narron. Ginger K 


Wilson 


Narron, Libba E. 


Wilson 


Nash. William D 


Monroe 


Newby.GolarC. 


Elizabeth City 


Newsome, Staris P. 


Pikeville 


Nichols, James P. 


Greenville 


Nobles, Wall. 1 S 


Washington 


Norris, Bonnie K. 


Burlington 


Norr is, Ethel M. 


Petersburg. Vu 


Norlhi oil. Dale A. 


Colerain 


Nunnery, Sherry L. 


Fayettevilie 


O'Boyle. ]amesE. 


Charlotte 


Odom. Amy L. 


Wilmington 


Odum. Sherwood H 


Sn imsboro 


Ogilvie, William S. Ala 


ssapeque Pk., N. V 


Olson, FredricM. 


Hubert 


O'Neal. David A. 


Richmond, Vu 


O'Neal. DebraD, 


Newport 


O'Neil.BrianJ. 


Durhum 


Osmon, Angela S. 


Elizabeth City 


Otte. Caleb 


Fayettevilie 


Owen. David C. 


Raleigh 


Owen, Laura A. 


Littleton 


Owens. Elizabeth L. 


Wilson 


Owens. |ames F. 


Bessemer City 


Owens. Linda L. 


Raleigh 


Packer. Nancy J. 


Clinton 


Padgett, Victor K 


Jacksonville 


Page. David R 


Fayettevilie 


Painter, Ronald A 


Toms River. N / 


Pardue. Stephen VV. 


Sun ford 


Parker, Kim E 


Greenville 


Parker. Millie C. 


Clinton 


Parrish. Ginger S. 


.Angler 


Parrish.RoseM. 


Lucunia 


Parrish. Terry L. 


Ruleigb 


Pale. Lois A. 


Tarboro 


Patterson, Kirby E, 


Concord 


Pearce. Carol!.. 


Castalia 


Pearce, ]ames A. 


Princeton 


Pearson. |eanne R. 


Raleigh 


Peedin. Faye M 


Durham 


Peopies. Pamela | 


Raeford 


Perry. Rodney F. 


Washington 


Perry. Teresa |. 


Hillsborough 


Peterson, Joan C. 


Harrells 


Peterson. Sandra C. 


Jacksonville 


Pharr, Mary T. 


Plymouth 


Phillips, Cheryl A. 


Durhum 


Phillips. Michael C. 


Thomasville 


Picked. Doric F. 


Arlington, Vu 


Piddington. Susan O. 


Fairfax, Va 



Freshmen 125 



Pierce, Romona 


Jacksonville 


Piercy, Deborah A. 


Hickory 


Pinkston. Sherryl L. 


Greenville 


Pledger, Mary P. 


Columbia 


Plonowski. Mary Ann 


Jacksonville 


Plumlee, Evelyn R, 


Sophia 


Poisson. Martha J. 


Charlotte 


Pull, in!, DoriceA. 


Greenville 


Pope, Frank 1, 


Rocky Mount 


Pope, Sylvia D. 


Wadesboro 


Postel. Elizabeth M. 


Raeford 


Powell, Curtis L. 


Cary 


Powell, Jeff A. 


Durhum 


Powers, Julia F. 


Grantsboro 


Presson. Kathryn L 


Raleigh 


Preddy. Virginia C. 


Killrell 


Price, Steven T. 


Lowell 


Prichard, Terry L. 


Burlington 


Pridgen. Mary L. 


Tarboro 


Proctor, Sandra R. 


Wilson 


Pronier. Constance L. 


Fayetteville 


Pugh, Craig B, 


Sophia 


Quinn, [ill 


Raleigh 


Radford. Pamela A. 


Kenly 


Ragan, Phyllis K 


Holly Springs 


Rains, Lynwood, |r. 


Princeton 


Ralston, Grant B. 


Fayetteville 


Rambeau, Rebecca A. 


Raleigh 


Ramee.GailS. 


Fairfax, Va, 


Randolph, Amelia G. ' 


Marion 


Ra|)er, Teresa G. 


Raleigh 


Rebello. Laurie A. 


Fayetteville 


Redd, Cindy 


Muysville 


Redwine, [effrey L. 


Albemarle 


Reed, Deborah A, 


Jacksonville 


Rehm, Charles R, 


Rocky Mount 


Reynolds, Cynthia M 


Roanoke Rapids 


Reynolds, |anice I. 


Fayetteville 


Rhodes, Man [. 


Kenansville 


Rich.CandaceE, 


Charlotte 


Richardson. Bennett C 


Williamsburg. Vu. 


Ricks. DebraA. 


Durhum 


Ridge. Steve W. 


< Wrenslnn o 


Riley.Melinda M 


Klland 


Rivenbark, Pansy A, 


Goldsboro 


Rivera, Maria T. 


Havelock 


Roach. Scott Ii, 


McMurray. Pa. 


Roberson, Cecilia A. 


Robersonville 


Roberson, Cordelia D. 


Robersonville 


Roberson, Jerry L. 


Rocky Mount 


Roberts, Douglas D 


Durham 


Robertson, Jeanne C 


Greenville 


Rogers, David W 


Fayetteville 


Rogers, Judy L. 


Roxboro 


Rogers, Mary C. 


Durham 


Rogers, Mary K. 


Virginia Beach. Va 




126 Freshmen 




Rogers. Vickie E. 
Rollins, FerrellL., |r. 

Rooker, Thomas R. 
Ross.BillieK. 
Ross. Cynthia 
Rounlree, Nancv C. 



Re 



, LorettaJ. 



Rowe, Sherre E. 

Roxbury, Laura E. 

Rubinstein, Hope T. 

Ruddle. Susan L. 

Ruff in. David W. 

Rufly, Melonie A. 

Rusinowski. Joseph W. Valley Slreum, NY 



Morganton 

7'arboro 

Warrenton 

Burlington 

Oak City 

Raleigh 

Wilson 

Haeford 

McLean, Va 

Silver Spring, Md. 

Newtown. Pa. 

Fayelteville 

Salisbury 



Rulledge. Debbie M. 
Sain. Bobbie |. 
Salleer. VeraG. 
Samoriski, Juliana P. 
Sanders, Cathy B. 
Sanger. Robert G. 
Sanges. Beverly ]. 

Sauls, Sheila A. 
Saunders, Carol E. 
Sause. Michael R. 
Saver. Sandra L. 
Schubert. Lynn M 
Scott. Sheila A. 
Sellars. Anita L. 

Senter, Jamie P. 
Sexton. Johnnie E. 
Shackelford. Ernest D. 
Shank, Barbara B, 
Sharpe. Roger W. 
Shaw. Vicki L. 
Shearin. Karl L. 

Shelton. Frances A. 
Sherman. Ida S. 
Shipley . Linda L. 
Shipman. Carolyn P. 
Short, Sheila M. 
Shull. Linda E, 
Simpson, Cynthia A. 

Simpson. Leonard B. 
Simmons. Sharon B. 
Sims. Louisa E. 
Sipe. Shirley D 
Slade.Tamara I. 
Slaughter. Lynn D. 
Sloppy, Kay J. 

Smallwood, James M. 
Smith, George F., Jr. 

Smith. Lee A. 
Smith, Linda K 
Smith, Marlyse A. 
Smith, Melanie A. 
Smith. Patricia t) 



Raleigh 

Churlolle 

Jacksonville 

Fairfax. Va. 

Durham 

Staunton 

Albemarle 

Fremont 

Burlington 

Cambridge. Md 

Lumberton 

Columbia. S. C. 

Fayetteville 

Carv 

Kipling 

Garland 
Asheboro 
Havelock 
Burlington 
Richlands 
Warrenton 

Ashland, V'a 

Burg a iv 

Weldon 

Holly Hi/1, S C 

Charlotte 

Stratford, Conn. 

Carthage 

Lucama 

Winston-Salem 

Greensboro 

Newton 

Rich Square 

Reston. V'a. 

Alexandria. Va 

Windsor 

Liberty 

Wilmington 

Ayden 

Reston, Va. 

Ml. Holly 

\Vn Hi-i 11 



Freshmen 127 



Smith. Rebecca G. 


Charlotte 


Smith. Robert C. 


Belmont 


Smith. Steven E. 


Charlotte 


Smithwick, Catherine M. 


Tacomu, Wash. 


Smothers. Robert C. 


Reidsvdle 


Soden. Deborah D. 


Rocky Mount 


Sossaman. ]anel M. 


Charlotte 


Southerland, Loretta C. 


Jacksonville 


Spargo. Vickie L. 


Raleigh 


S|)ears, Donald R 


Fayetteville 


Spencer. Robert E., |r, 


Asheville 


Spencer, Sam J, 


Merritt 


Spengeman, Craig C. 


Chatham, N | 


Spivey. |uliaW. 


Tabor City 


Spruill, Wanda K. 


Oriental 


Stancil, Michael F, 


Middlesex 


Stanley. Barbara A 


Foar Oaks 


Stanley. Deborah ] 


Henderson 


Stanley, Rebecca L, 


Aberdeen 


Stell, Denise D. 


San ford 


Stevens, Charles A. 


Fayetteville 


Stockstill, Susan |. 


Hi. hmond, V'u 


Stokes. Catherine A. 


Greenville 


Stone, janne E. 


Durham 


Stone. Sallie E. 


Bluefield, W. V'u 



Strannahan, [acquelynn Federalsburg, Aid. 

Strickland, Deborah I. Ft. Stewart. Cu 

Strickland, Jackie M. Kenly 

Strickland. Kimberley Tarboro 

Stulihs. Fletcher G. Bennettsville. S. C. 

Sutherland. Monika L, Goldsboro 

Swain, |ay H. Creswell 

Swanson. Deborah I.. Rocky Mount 

Szabo, Valerie Emporia, V'u 

Talberl.KalherineC. Havelock 



Talton, Susan R. 


Clinton 


Tanlon. Vicki L. 


Fayetteville 


Taylor, Deborah P. 


Lumberton 


Taylor, Kimberly S. 


Gary 


1 a\ b n . Pamela \1 


Kinston 


Taylor, PhillisK, 


/ackson 


Tedder, |udy L. 


Raleigh 


Tew.SherrvR. 


Clinton 


Tharp. Barbara |. 


Morehead City 


Thigpen, Barbara A. 


Maury 


Thomas. |udy D 


New Bern 


Thomas, Nancy L. 


Wilmington 


Thomas, Richard D. 


Dunn 


Thomas, Sheryl 1. 


Raleigh 


Thomas. Terry 


Bethel 


Thomason, Linda L 


Fairfax, Va. 


Thompson, Audrey |. 


Fayetteville 


Thompson, Barbara | 


Scotland Neck 


Thompson. Patricia G. 


Windsor 


Thompson. Ricky R. 


Henderson 


Thompson, Susan I. 


Warrenton 




128 Freshmen 




f£ & (*} A ^ 




Thornell.Mar) I, 


Rock) Mount 


Thornton, Rebeci a It 


Kelly 


Tingle, Linda G 


( Iriental 


Tollner, Carroll 


Greensboro 


Tompkins. Denise P 


Mebane 


Toole, Robert |. 


Arnold, Md 


Topping, Deborah 1, 


Littleton 


Tucker, Frances L. 


Raleigh 


Tugwell, [effen P 


Farmville 


Tully.Tern 1. 


Vanceboro 


Turner. Elizabeth L. 


Charlotte 


Turner, lames E.. |r. 


Rocky Mount 


Twigg. DanaR. 


Sayre, Pa 


Tyler.David R 


Greenville 


Tyler, |ohnM 


Rnckinghum 


Tyner, |effre> L. 


SI I'uuls 


Umphlett, Sheila P. 


Corapeake 


Underhill, Susan F. 


Wendell 


1 ltle\ . Donna N. 


Sanford 


Van Berger. Michael It 


Goldsboro 


Vandiuez, Bobb\ K 


Charlotte 


Vann.RoseM 


Fayetteville 


Van Nortwick. Eric D 


Sun Francisco, (Jul 


Vaughn, Jo B. 


Burlington 


Vernon. Debra F. 


Warsaw 


Woddell, Michael G. 


Charlotte 


Walker. Eric C. 


Charlotte 


Walker. (ohnT. 


Chad bourn 


Walker, Patricia L 


Durham 


Wall. Tawny L. 


Chocowinity 


Waller, HelenS 


k'inston 


\\, ill. ri Nam \ B 


Burlington. \ | 


Wallner.MarciaD. 


Burlington 


Walton. William C . Ill 


Raleigh 


Ward, Barbara G. 


Winterville 


Ward. Vera T. 


Jacksonville 


Warren. Ann M. 


Washington 


Warren, Laura G. 


Newton drove 


Warren, Gary L. 


Greenville 


Waters. Patsy L. 


Goldsboro 


Watkins, Leigh H. 


Durham 


Watson. Janei M 


Kenly 


Weeks. Caroline P. 


Creedmoor 


Whalley.Amj S 


Durham 


Wheeler, DelhU 


Durham 


White, lames L. 


Greenville 


While. |ohn |. 


Dayton, 1 )hio 


White. Sharon R. 


Raleigh 


Whitehead. Michael II 


Washington 


Whitehurst. Marie A. 


Plymouth 


Whitford.Man S 


\ru Bern 


Whitley, Beverh A 


Charlotte 


Whitley. Ella P. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Whitley, |uneC 


Grifton 


Whitley, MonaG 


Wilson 


Whittington, Sara |, 


Fuqua\ -Varina 



Freshmen 129 



Wiggins, l.in .> 1. 


.Abusklr 


Wiggins, Wanda R. 


Seaboard 


Willi, mis, Annie K. 


Rock) Mount 


Williams, Carol L. 


Wilmington 


Williams, Emilj M 


Greenville 


Williams. |ohnT.,]r. 


Asheboro 


Williams, Karen 1. 


Hillsborough 


Williams, Kathye A. 


Chapel Hill 


Williams, Kennen D 


Concord 


Williams, Robin I. 


Greenville 


Williams. Rosalee B, 


Huntersville 


Williamson, Dann\ 


Clinton 


Willis. Donna |. 


Grantsboro 


Willis, Marilyn V 


Morehead City 


Willms, Calln I. 


Rumson, N. /. 


Wilmoth, Lit!' 


Winston-Salem 


Wilson. Glenda J 


Old Fort 


Wilson. Laurie E. 


Wilmington 


Wilson, Russell E. 


Eden 


Wilson. Vivian E. 


Martinsville, Va 


Wimberley, Patricia A. 


Aberdeen 


Wingo, Karen I. 


Rocky Mount 


Winstead, Linda | 


Louisburg 


Wood.Terrj |. 


Winston-Salem 


W lall, Ian. la K 


-Angler 


Woodard, Deborah K. 


Conway 


Woodard. Marshall W, 


Coldsboro 


Woolard. Patricia A. 


Washington 


Wrenn, Bev erl) A 


Raleigh 


Wright, Debra A 


Lees burg. Va. 


Wright, [une A. 


Roanoke Rapids 


Wright, Susan M. 


Rounoke Rapids 


W\ lie. Harold T. 


New Bern 


Wysocki, Annette B. 


Raleigh 


Yezarski. Linda I, 


Morehead City 


Younger. Elizabeth C. 


Winston-Salem 


Yount, Carol |. 


Rockingham 


YounI. Calln I. 


Rockingham 


Zahran. Joseph P., II 


Greensboro 


Zanger. Thomas [. 


Moorestown, \ J 




©i\An£ 





130 Freshmen 



Who's Who among 
Students in 
American Colleges 
and Universities 




Who's Wh,> 131 




132 Who's Who 




Who's Who 133 




Top left: Rebecca Elizabeth Eure 

Top right: Donna [eanne Grose 

Above: Sally Lee Harland 

Right: Jacqueline Hawkins 



134 Who's Who 




Who's Who 135 




136 Who's Who 




Who's Who 137 







Top left: Donna Peterson 

Top right: William Winslow Phipps 

Above: Thomas Walter Schubert 

Right: Cynthia Eldean Rhodes Pierce 



138 Who's Who 




IVhciMVhn 139 




Top right: |ames Roger Westmoreland 
Above: Carol Anne Wood 
Right: Linda Dianne Vann 



Not pictured: 

l,.iw rence Rush Atkinson, IV 

Linda Lee Crandall 

Anne Watts Durham 

Thomas Weslej Durham 

Albert Gibert Kennedy 

Ralph Conley Worthington, |r. 

Harrv Lee Yoder 




u» Who's Who 



BUCCANEER 74. 

ORGANIZATIONS • A 




Accounting Society 



Glenda K. Albert; |ohn Aldridge; Larry 
Bissette: Linda Blackwelder: Debra Car- 
son, Pros.; Preston Clark: Willie Creech: 
David Englert, Sec.-Treas.; Danny Min- 
shew; ]ohn Narron; Paul L. Nunn; Miss 
Gwen Potter. Adv.; John Robbins; Bar- 
bara Sauls. V.-Pres.: Bruce Siberman. 
Corr. Sec. 



Cheryl Berry; Karen Buggs; Doris Burton; 
Chris Carroll; Teresa Carter; Melinda 
Daniels; Alice Ey; Brenda Harden; Linda 
Harden, Administrative Officer; Diane 
Harrell; Phyllis Hughes, Commander; 
Valeria Huggins, Executive Officer; 
Cathy Long. Operations Officer; Ann 
Lundy; Elaine McClendon; Pam Peeler; 
Carol Proctor. Comptroller; Carol Vance 
leckv Warwick 



Angel Flight 





Janet Barbee; Marilyn Barfield; Kathy 
Beaman; Mary K. Bell; Cherryl Berry; 
Marilyn Bottoms. Rep.; Genie C. Brann; 
Melissa Brantley; Leila Brown; Kathy 
Bryan; Alice Buffaloe; Mary Burhaead; 
Janice Burroughs; Martha Byrd; Mary 
Carawan; Deborah Cardwell: Sheila 
Cates; Martha Chambers; Mary Clement, 
Treas.; Janice Cobb; Evelyn Daill; Lisa 
Davis; Wanda Dickerson; Emily Dixon; 
Rebecca Edwards; Donna Eure; Sandra 
Garrett; Janet Gorham. V-Pres.; Virginia 
Hamilton; Docia Harrell; Peggy Harris; 
Gretchen L. Heid; Patricia Herman; Sara 
Hill; Wanda Jackson; Susan James; Chris- 
tiana Johnson. Pres.; Pamela Johnson; 
Janice Jones; Jeanne Knight; Connie Law- 
kowski; Rebecca Lewis; Carolyn Mans- 
field; Glenda Marsh; Belinda Martin- 
dale; Carolyn Mayo; Carolyn McDonald; 
Patricia McGaughy; Gave McLamb; Pa- 



tricia McMahon; Cara Merritt; Deborah 
Midgett; Cindy Miller; Judy Moir; Katie 
Moore; Linda Morgan; Mary Morris; 
Martha Munn; Linda L. Neilson; Nancy 
Nicklin; Julia Oliver; Laura Owens; Betty 
Pacher; Ann Parsley; Jean Pearce; Bev- 
erly Pegram; Glenda Pegram; Joan Pit- 
cher; Donna Price; Linda Rice; Martha 
Riddle; Deborah Scott; Elaine Shook; 
Daisey Short; Jo Anne Sloan; Mary Kay 
Smith; Carolyn Stewart; Judy Surratt; 
Linda Tart; Jackie Taylor; Diane Terry; 
Angela Tripp; Martha Wade; Hettie Wal- 
lace; Susan Walton; Emily White; Cathy 
Whitehurst; Donna Wilkins; Carolyn Wil- 
liams; Judy K. Williams; Linda Win- 
stead; Debbie Wisneski; Gary Wong; 
Carol Wood; Susan Wood; Jane Woodley; 
Janet Woolard. Sec: Joe Yates; Sylvia 
Zelkin 



American 

Home Economics 

Association 



142 Organization 




Arnold 
Air Society 

Roster not available 




Association 

for 
Computing 
Machines 



Barry Blackard; Matthew Crovitz: Tom 
Deaton. Pres.; Bob Hudgins. V-Pres.; 
Marcia James. Sec; Dr. F. Milam John- 
son. Adv.; Dianne Lefler; Tom Redding. 
Treas. 



Organizations 143 



74 
Buccaneer 



Carlene Boyd; Debra Carson: Pat Foun- 
tain; Jeanne Hagan; Kathy Jones; Kim 
Kuzmuk; Nancy Leggett; Gary McCul- 
lough; Chris Mills; Patsy Mills;' Will Pitt- 
man; Monika Sutherland; Rick Tombs 





144 Organizations 




Chamber Singers 



lames Allison, V-Pres.: Dianne Braak; 
Nancy Brown; Ken Davis. Pres.; Tal- 
madge Fauntleroy, Lib.; Mike Hailhcock; 
Vicki J. Harrison; Susan Hill; Mary Ann 
[pock; Wesley Letchworth; Susan Mar- 
lowe; Robert McDuffie; James McQuis- 
lon; Linda Montague; Dr. Charles Moore. 
Dir.; Glenn Moore. Accomp.; Debra 
Stokes. Sec; Frank Tatem; Benjie Tem- 
pleton; Melissa Thrasher; Charles Town- 
send (Photo courtesy of The Daily Re- 
flector) 







Club Football 

Roster not available 



Organizations 145 




Concert 
Band 



Elizabeth Austin; Annette Ayers: Keith 
Bailey; Katrina Baynard; Patricia Berr 
|ohn Birge; Shirley Blandino; Diane 
Bockes; Karen Brown; Travis Brown 
|ames Bryant; Thomas Bumgarner; Don 
aid Bunch; Gary Cassedy; Carol Cherrix 
Linda Clark; Larry Clayton; Carolyn 
Cooney; David Dawson; Rohert Dickie 
David Englert; Deborah Fales; Jane Fet 
ner; Candace Flowers; Chauncey Gale 
Michael Green; Billy Grimmett; Maxwell 
Hahn; Debra Hardy; Andrea Harman 
William Hart, Donald Harllaub; David 
Herring; Barbara Hill; Joseph Hodges; 
Gary Hudson; Frederick Hurley; Denise 
Jackson; John Keanon; Larry I.amkin; 



Edith Landon; Richard Latham; Arthur 
Mayfield; Carl McCombs; Barbara Mc- 
Culcheon; Stephen McKinney; Alan Mc- 
Quislon; Ben Mullen; Christine Myers; 
Deborah Nachman; Ben Newhall; Ethel 
Morris; Robert Parks: |eanne Parrett; Les- 
lie Parsons: Curtis Pitsenbarger: Gail 
Ramee; William Reinhart; Paul Rigsbee; 
Mary Rutledge; Robert Sanger; Cynthia 
Simpson; Carl Smith: Samuel Smith; John 
Spence; Charles Starr: Jane Stowe; 
Fletcher Stubbs; Charles Taylor; Stephen 
Thompson; Robert Tyler; Michael Walk- 
er: Stephen Walker; Glenn Walsh; James 
White; Nancy White; Mary Williams 



146 Organizations 




Trudy Allen: Belly Austin; Debbj Bar- 
bee; Carol Brown; Joan Bryant; Ed Cap- 

padge: Chad Chadwick. V-Pres.; Carmen 
Clark. ]an Coolery; Deborah Crolts. Sec; 
Alia Cummings; Suzanne Duperick; Kelly 
Givin; Milton Hall; Wade Hobgood; Rick 
Latour; Elaine Mclntire: Lucy Morris; 
Sherry Mumford; Shep Shepherd. Pres.; 
Jove Singleton; Karen Swenson; |ohn 
Tiedje; Delia Timanus; Phyllis Whitley; 
Carla Wilmoth. 



Design Associates 




ECU 
Playhouse 



lenniler Applewhite: Joyce Baker; The- 
resa Baker; Vickie Batchelor; Rosalyn 
Barlowe; Robert Beard; Barbara Benja- 
min; Montj Biggs; Mitchell Bowen; 

Willi. im M. Brooks; Doug Burnett; Laura 
Burroughs; Carol John Caldwell; Russell 
Chesson: James Dalessandio; Roger Den- 
nehy; Bill Devins; Leah Dunn, Stan 
Edwards; Rodney B Freeze; Steve Gei- 
ger; Mick Godwin; William Gurganus; 
Chestei Hardison; Vickie Harrison; Kim 
I lodges: Emil Hollow. iy; Pam [tonkins; 
Jerome Jones; Susan Lambeth; Cathy 
Maness; Tom Maney; Marshal McAden; 



Rolilun McDowell; Susan Mcl.eod. James 
McQuiston; Tonj Medlin; Jennifer Mil- 
ler. Dana Mills; J .in Newsome; Terrj 
Pickard; Rick Price; Theresa Riviera: 
Stephen Roberts; Francine Rouls; Mark 
Swart/. Sheila Scott; Lorraine Shai kle- 
ford; Jackie Shallcross; Linda Simpson; 
Gregory Smith. Kuk Thayer. Larry 
Thomas; Martin Thompson; McCall 
'Thompson; Terrs 'Thompson; |udv Town- 
send. Janice Vertuci i; Clarence Williams 
III; 'Ten Woodard; [efi Woodruff; Pattv 
Yates 



Organizations 147 



ECU 

Student 

Union 



Dean Rudolph Alexander. Adv ; M,n\ 
Cromartie, Films Chrm.; fackie Hawkins, 
Lecture Chrm.; Wade Hobgood, Spec 
Concerts Chrm . Giberl Kennedy, Pres.; 
Tona Price, Pop Entertainment Chrm.; 
Marilj n Rucks. Rec. Chrm ; Dun Squires. 

The r Arts Chrm.; Doris Stephens 

Sec : Dale Tucker, Artist Series Chrm.; 
Hill Womble. Coffee House Chrm. 




Fountainhead 



Pal Crawford. Editor; Dave Englert. Assl 
Spurts Ed.: Betsj Fernandez, News Ed 
Linda Gardner, tins Mgr.; Ann Harrison 
Layout Ed.; Elizabeth Kennerly, Layoul 
Ed ; Alice Leary, Typist; Perri Morgan 
Ad Mgr ; |ack Morrow, Sports Ed Miki 
Parsons, Assl News Ed . Skip Saunders 
News Ed Darrell Williams, Assl News 
Ed 




ux Organizations 



French Club 



Sarah Barnhill; Shern Le Brown: Muri 
Bui; Mark Bunch, V-Pres . Ruth Ann Co 
lej Sri . Ka\ Conner; Dennis Crai 
Martha Culton; Pam Diffee; |oyce Im 
wards; Lee Farmer; Leo Franke, Trea! 
H0II5 Glenn; Lynn Grawlee; Lynn Ha 
old; Terri Harrison; Donna Hawkin 
Turn Hawkins; Valerie Hutcherson; M 
hammed Jagiri; Jonathan Keathly, Pre! 

[ohn Leys; Whil McLawhorn; Gh 1 

Mehidi; David Owen; |une Pate; Shan 
Renfrow; Hubert Renie; Harold Robei 
son; Pauline Tudor: Barbara Turne 
Jewel Walson 





Maxter Allen: Ronald Binkley; Ed Cam 

Erber, Ad\ ; thorn 

Robert Gr 



bell: Dr. Elrrn 

Fleming; Glenwood < -arm 

tin |ack Gurkin; Thomas Haigwoo 

Salh Harland: Bill Hoffman; Willia 

I tools; |ohn Hodges: Dan [ones: I. 

[ones; |ohn Kelly; Benny Knox. Ron La 

caster; Raymond Lewis; John Moone 

I lhai Irs ( lairs; Alan Parkinson, Hi 1 1 \ Pi 

roll; Mike Pitt; Mike Pittman; Gene Ri 

die; Steven Shearin; Del Taylor; |am 

Taylor; |ohnnv Thomas: Charles Tucki 

Wi n Van Male; Larry Vincent; Pa 

Waldrop 



Industrial & 

Technical 

Education 

Club 



International 

Relations 

Club 



And 



Adiele 



VV. 



Africa: Mehrshid 
Barnwell. Guyana; 
Maninder Bolaria, 
Viel Nam; Joseph 



Anrari. Iran; Caryl 
Sanli Baru, India; 
India. Muriel Bui, 
Chan. Hong Kong; Dar-Hang Chin. Tai- 
wan; Chao-Kang Chu, Taiwan; Paul Chu, 
Taiwan; Armado Delenn. Mexico; Robert 
Dickie, Scotland; Nancy Foster, Bolivia; 
Abdul Ali Ghori, Afganistan; Yukikiro 
Gushi, Okinawa. |eng-Ming Hsu. Taiwan; 
Ali Ibrahim, Lebanon; Anthony Ishichei. 
Nigeria; |amshid [afari, Iran; Parvin [at- 
ari, Iran; Byung-Chin Kim. Korea; [oseph 
Lee, Taiwan; Katrina Lee, Hong Kong; 
Billy Ma, Viel Nam; Kien Chi Ma, Viel 
Nam; Fotehmonin Mohmahali, India. 
Luchy Oronoz, Puerto Rico: Sukhum 
Praisarnl, Thailand; Hubert Renie, 
France; Luis Rivera, Puerto Rico; Mo- 
hammad Saba, Iran, N. Thinikaran, 
Malaysia; Ralph '['relies. Colobia: Mi- 
chael Van Bergen, Netherlands; Samari 
Varela, Costa Rica. 




Jazz 
Ensemble 



Doug Adams: ]ohn Birge; Phil Bryant; 
Bruce Burns; Garj Cassedy; Bob Conger; 
Robert Dickie; Dwighl Flickenger; |ohn 
Goodall: Mike Haithcock; Glenn Harris; 
I ohn Higgins: Alex Holten; Gary Hudson; 
John Keanon; Larry Lamkin; Rick La- 
tham; Art Mayfield; Danny McCrary. 
Tony McCutchen; Richard McMahan; 
lesse Nelson; Ben Newhall; Berl Owens; 

I Parks; David Pollard: Wayne Powell; 

Alan Rutledge; Bob .Sanger: Tom Secor; 
Mike Shanlz. Tom Shields: Cindy Simp- 
son; Alan Smilh. Lynn Slanle'v; Phil 
Thompson; Buz Tyler; Steve Walker; 
Glenn Walsh. Lam While; Edwin 

Williams 




I )rganizatlons 





|aime An 



i:k Collins. |i 



Dodd; Debbie Eagan; Hilln 
Elam: [ane Hayes; Mike Hayes; |udj 
Hewitt: Phil Hewitt; Brian Higgins: Den 
ins Honeycutt, V-Pres.; Liz Koszulinski 
Lou Meyers; |. R. Murphy; Martha |,im 
Poisson; Sum Sams. Pres.; Ken Sawyer 
|ames Silva; ]im Thompson 




Karate Club 



Roster Not Available 



Organizations J Si 




George Betlsworlh; Sieve Benjamin; 
David Boone; Richard Calvin; David 
Childs; Linda Crandall; John Crawley; 
lack H. Derrick; Randy Daub; William C. 
Ealy; Barbara Edwards; Cynlhia Farmer; 
Chris Farrell; Grier Ferguson; Steven 
Geiger: Bobby Gibbs; David Griggs; 
Dwight Hall; |oe Henderson: Randy 
Hudson; Cedric F. Jones; Martha Kellam; 
|nhn Kellogg; |ayne Key; Frank King. ]r.; 
Lenwood Lee; Robert Lucas; ]ack Miller; 
John Narron; Gary Naylor; Iver Petersen: 
|nhn Prevelle; Ron Ramsey: Brigid 
Reddy; Dr. Waldron Snyder. Adv.; Don- 
ald Spears; Michael Springle; Hubert 
Stroud; Harry Stuhhs; Gene Thomas; 
Brandon Tise; |ohn Versteeg; Perrv Wal- 
ton; Mike West; Frnest Wruck; Cindi 
Easlerling 





Lyle Barlowe; Vicki Bass: Steve Benja- 
min; Pam Boswell; Marilyn Bottoms 
Steve Boyd; Karen Campbell; Mark 
Clark. Pres.; Julia Cleveland; Cathy Co- 
wart; Allen Daniel. Rep.; Dr. |ohn D 
Ebbs. Adv.; Laura Ebbs: Pam Fisher; Ann 
Fleming; Andrea Harman; Alice Harrell. 
V-Pres.; Karen Haskell; Debbie Hollo- 
man; Ann Hudgins; Marcia James: Mike 
Kegereiss: ]eff Kranlz; Beth Lambeth; 
Linda Lassiter; Barbara Mallhews. 
Treas.; Art Mayfield; Alan McQuiston; 
Mike Moore; Pam Radford; Julius Regis- 
ter; Patrick Tesh; Bob VanGundy; Linda 
Wagner. Sec; Sally Williams 



League of Scholars 



152 Organizations 




Jennifer Adcock; James Allison; Dorothy 
Armstrong; Michael Amy; Annette 
Avers; Keith Bailey; William Barbe; 
Diane Barbour; Katrina Baynard; John 
Birge; Leroy Bland: Shirley Blandino; 
Brian Blount; Debra Bost; Lisa Boyce; 
Holly Brenner; Karen Brown; Travis 
Brown; James Bryant: Regina Bullock; 
Thomas Bumgarner; Donald Bunch; 
Doris Burton; Gary Cassedy; Carol Cher- 
rix; Linda Clark; Sidney Clark; Larry 
Clayton: Catherine Conger; Carolyn 
Cooney; Claudia Connally; Lela Cran- 
dall; David Dawson: Mary Dean: Robert 
Dickie; Deborah Gahagan; Chauncey 
Gale; Scott Gardner; Michael Green; 
Billy Grimmett: Richard Guptill; Max- 
well Hahn; Michael Haithcock; Andrea 
Harmon; Mary Hart: William Hart; Don- 
ald Hartlaub; Wardlow Hawes; David 
Herring; Nellie Hickman. Barbara Hill; 
Carlton Hirschi; Joseph Hodges: Gary 
Hudson; Debra Humphreys; Frederick 
Hurley; Denise Jackson; Philips Johnson; 
Janet Jones: Cheryl Jordan; John Keanon; 



Robin Kinton: Sheila Kurle; Larry Lam- 
kin; Edith Landon; Richard Latham; 
Bruce Mack; Arthur Mayfield; Barbara 
McCutcheon; Stephen McKinney; Alan 
McQuiston; Kalhy McRorie; Teresa 
Meeks; Anne Melvin; Penelope Miller; 
Ben Mullen; Christine Myers; Deborah 
X'achman; Benjamin Newhall; Ethel Nor- 
ris; Robert Parks; Jeanne Parrett; Leslie 
Parsons; Curtis Pilsenbarger; Virginia 
Preddy; Gail Ramee; William Reinhart; 
Candace Rich; Mary Rutledge; |uliana 
Samoriski: Sidney Sanders; Robert San- 
ger; Ronald Sharpless; Sheila Short; 
Phyllis Sigmon; Susan Sikes; Cynthia 
Simpson; Kay Sloppy; Samuel Smith: 
John Spence; Charles Starr; Jane Slowe; 
Fletcher Stubbs; Charles Taylor; Judy 
Thomas: Stephen Thompson; Karen 
Todd; Robert Tyler: Raymond Tyndall; 
Michael Walker; Stephen Walker; Glenn 
Walsh: Joann Walter; Wanda Washing- 
ton; James While; Mary Williams; Her- 
bert Woolard; Marsha Wray 



Marching 
Pirates 



Organizations 



Men's 

Residence 

Council 



Fred Austin; Larrj Chesson; Richard 
Cook, Bill Harrison, Sec; [oej Hobles; 
Dennis Honeycutt; |oe Johnson, Pres.; 
Tim Lowery; |im Morgan; Don Rains, 
Treas ; Allen Reiman; Barrj Self; Run 
Sharpless; |oeZahran, 





fto^J 


am V ■ 


fcfij^J 


W _ — i- Wmmmmi 


HbM^wV, ttc7' ;H 


1 I ■ -M ~wBl 





National 
Association 
of Industrial 
Technology 



Berl Austin; Roberl Barr; Millard Bar- 
row . Run Binkle) . I)r Fred L. Broadhurst, 
Ad\ . Billj Burk; Keith Cline; Clyde Cul- 
ler: Walter Gould; Butch Harris; |amshid 
|afari. V-Pres.; Alton [ones; Dan |ones, 
Sec. -Treas.; Alvin foyner; Sam Kale: 
Gars Krause; Ton} Kulesla; Ron Lan- 
■ aster; Bill Lilley; Randj Lilley; Alan 
Lockamy: Eddie Martin; Ben Miller; Lee 
Miller; Chuck Padgett; Robert Pillman; 
Dewey Price; Steve Shearin, Pres . Km 
Smith; Steve Smith; Al Stonei . Waren 
ralley; Mr [errj Tester, Adv.; |nhn 
Tromness; Km Truelove; |ames Walker; 
Chuck Windlev. 




154 ' n conizations 







National 

Association 

Of Social 

Workers 


Vickie Causby; Bill Edwards; Mrs. Glad- 
ys Frankford; Debra |ames; Dr. C.G. 
Kledaras: Joe Slalon; Mr. Gerald Soulh- 
erland; )ohn Walton 


I 'W* W • ^ 






Student Speech and Hearing Association 



Roster not available 



Organizations 155 



National Society of Interior Design 



Roster not available 



North 
Carolina 

Music 

Teachers 

Association 

Roster not available 




156 Organization 




Vernon Bean; DiAnne Bowen: Frieda 
Clark. V-Chr.: |im Davis; [ohn Davis; I) 
D. Dixon. Sec; Mike Edwards; Sallj 
Freeman; Rick Gilliam; |immy Honey- 
cull; Maurice Hunllej : Susan Jewell; Lee 
McLaughlin. Adv.; Greg McLeod; Steve 
Nobles; lane Noffsinger; Angela Pennins; 
[ohn Prevette; Susan Quinn; Debbie Rut- 
ledge; Harrj Stubbs, Chrm . Valerie 
Szabo; Mike West; San.l\ Wesl 



Delegation to the North 

Carolina Student 

Legislature 




Carrie Bean: Sal Clark. Mike Carney; 
David Dawson; Lowell Harper; Sallj Hel- 
ton; Carlton Hirschi; Harold A Jones, 
Dir.; Rick Lathour; Tonj McCutchen: 
Alan Smilh. Wayne Strickland; Karl Tay- 
lor; Dannj Tindall; Larn While 



Percussion 
Ensemble 




Gloria Bone; Scarlell Bunch: Karen Di 
Risio; Douglas Drew; |ean Ennist; Sieve 
Freeman; Charles Hardesty; |oan Hau- 
benriser; Brenda Holden; Dale Muggins; 
Karen Hudson; |im Irvin; Marion Leh- 
mon; Anna Mason; Sieve McMillan; 
Paula Mitchell; Donald Owen; Willie 
Settle; Susan Seymour; Carvon Short; 
Martha Short; Susanna Thompson; Wan- 
da Ward; Gail Williams; Gloria Wilson 




Poetry 
Forum 

Roster not available 




158 Organizations 



No picture available 



Parks, 
Recreation, 

and 

Conservation 

Service 



Steve Abene; Paul Albertson; Kaj 
Barnes; Cathy Barber: Leandra Bedini; 
Ron Bosers; Forrest Brown. Pres.; Sheila 
Brothers: |oe Buckley; Eddie Byerly; 
|erry Campbell: Gene Cole; liuli Cowan: 
rim Cramer; Dare Crawford: Frances 
Davenport: |im Dr. ins. Slnd Coordinator; 
|o Dennis; Marcia Faulk; Patsy Fluke; Gin 
Fox; Ray Franks; Mackie Garner. Pres.; 
C. L. Gobble: John Hoflman; Tim Huz; 
Mary Kelly; Linda Lockhart; Gail Lytle; 
Ken Martin; Betty McDade: Kick McKay: 
Leslie McNair; Beth Olsen; [erome 
Owens; Pollen Phelps. Sec -Tie, is , Gail 
Phillips; Sarah Rigsbee; Greg Robertson: 
Marilyn Rocks, Exl. Sec; Carol A. Smilh; 
Carol E Smith. "Snuffy" Smith; Beth 
Stanley; I). Ralph Steele. Adv.: Elisa 
Troutman: Bill Volivia: Randy Wade; 
Man Winters 




Marty Askew: Ginny Baldwin; F.d B, ill- 
icit; Carlton Batten; Ranch Baxter, Doug 
Benson Tommy Bird; David Bremer 
|oseph Chan; Vondell Clark, Bart Clear} 
David Cook. Ramly Cox: Lain Crocker 
Ernest Dunn: Rodgei Feldhause; Ann 
Fleming; Bill Fowler; |oseph Givson; 
George Howard; Steve Horner: Gary 1 1\ - 
man; Gregg [ones, Chrm, Steering 
Comm.: Jeff Kincaid; Stanley Kini;, [ohn 
Lambeth: Tom Landen. Pres.; Buck Lin- 
thicum; Barbara Luciana; Bill Martin; 



Michael Martin: Bob Mashburn; Tillel 
Mills, Zeb Moseley; Bob Neal; Fred Ob- 
iii 1, Harold Overcash; Ron Painter; Kan 

Pe I k; Ken Perkins; Will Perrj , |err) 

Quinn; William Robinson, Pres Elect; 
Rodney Sawyer; Dan Scruggs; Harry 
Severance; Ian. Simmons: George Sober. 
Bub Simler. Wayne Stephens; I,arr\ 
Siirles, Dolores Thomas; Terry Thomp- 
son Mark Tyler; Ray Tyndall: Bill Vurn- 
akes: David Watson; |ohn Wharton; Fred 
Whitehurst; Larry Whitlock 



Pre Med 




Phillip Arrington, Editor; Marvin Hunt 
Co-Ed.: Glenn Lewis. Art Dir.; Sandj 
Penfield. Co-Ed. ; David Swink, Bus. Mgr 



Publications 
Board 



Phil Arrington; Pat Crawford: Tommy 
Dairs; Wanda Edwards: Karen |o Has- 
kell; Kenneth Howell; Kalhy Jones; Gary 
McCullough: Bob McKeel, Chrm.; Chris 
Mills; Brenda Sanders 




Ifin i indenizations 



^> 



WUROUKU 



l*MM\mi&mj\w 



Review 
Board 



louglas Benson: David Englert: K 
;huck Maxwell; Hill Phipps; Br 




Society for 
Advancement 

of 
Management 



Bridf-ers; Linda Carrel; Welfred 
I: Randall Corriler; Kunnelh 
Roberl Faries; Rick Gilliam. Pres ; 
Haney; Linwood Hobgood. Sec- 
David Honevcutt: Tern Huchi- 
lan [ones. V-Pres.; Roberl Kirk 
vnlhia Lillev; lack Millei |ovcc 
k; Richard Phillips. Thomas I'm 



Christopher Rice; Roberl Roval; 



li Smith; Hill 



onald Shumaker; 
rhomas; 1 .1 egoi \ 
Walclen; Calvin 



1 Irganizations 161 




SGA 
Legislature 



Vern Bran: Bill Beckner: Sheila Bolick 
David Boone; Gayle Bust; David Bullock 
Kathryn Byrd: Laddie Crisp: )ohn Davis 
Tom Dickens; D.D. Dixon; Cindy Domme 
Kathy Drake; Mike Kdwards; Crier Fer- 
guson; Rick Garretl; Rick Gilliam; Bonnie 
Grantham; Braxton Hall. Speaker; Jimmy 
Honeycutt; Natham Kelly; Kaki King; 
Patrice Langdon; Yvonne Marlindalo; 



Lee McLaughlin; Paula Merrel; Doug 
Miller: Nancy Morgan; |ane Noffsinger; 
Kathy Owens; Eric Ripper: Cynthia Rob- 
bins; Nancy Rogerson; Debbie Rutledge; 
Pat Samoriski;" Jackie Shallcross; Harry 
Stubbs; Charlotte Swayze; Lou Anne Tay- 
lor: Tommy Thomason; Craig Thorton; 
Brandon Tise; Vickie Vaughn; Jim Wesl- 
moreland; Mimi Whiteside; Terry Wood. 



162 < )rganizations 




Luis Acevez, Adv.; Belinda Barnwell 
Betty Buck; Mary Campbell. Pres.; Ai 
mando de Leon; Nancy Foster; Penn 
Hall; Alan Jones; Debbie Jones; Marsh 
McGaha, Sec.-Treas.; Lynda McMichae 
V-Pres. : Cheryl Peevy, Asst. V-Pres 
Joyce Propopio; Luis Rivera, Asst. Sec, 
Treas.; Samari Varela-Rivas 




Student Council for 
Exceptional Children 



Roster not available 



Organizations 163 



Student 

National 

Education 

Association 

Roster not available 





Symphony 
Orchestra 



Douglas Adams; Dorothy Alden; Edgar 
Alden; James Allison; Nancy Atkins; 
I.inda Bass. |oanne Bath; Pamela Bath; 
Gary Beachamp; Ben Bezanson; Dee 
Anna Braxton; Bill Brya; Jane Brown; 
Robin Brown; Karen Campbell; Claudia 
Carmore; Candace Cicerone; Sid Clark; 
Robert Conger; Marshall Craig; Marie 
Davis, Carolyn Dixon; Larry Dowdy; 
Scott Gardner; |ohn Goodall; Richard 
Guptill; Marion Harding; Mary Ruth 
Hardy; Andrea Harmon; Wendy Har- 
mon; Robert Hendrick; John Heard; 
Carlton Hirschi; Timothy Hoffman; Alex- 
ander Holten; Elizabeth Horton; Lisa 



Huffman; Tim Jewell; Lance Kellas; Jan 
Kittrell; Jim Kittrell; Leslie Kopp; Mi- 
chael Levin; Bruce MacDonald; Joan 
Mack; Mark McKay; Penny Miller; Deb- 
orah Minetree; Suzanne Moore; Laura 
Morgan; Steve Natrella; Jesse Nelson; 
Vincent Pitt; Mardee Reed; Thomas 
Reed; William Reinhart; Rodney Sch- 
midt; James Searl; Thomas Secor; Erik 
Sieurin; Steve Skillman; |anis Skoda; 
Michael Smith; Elizabeth Stoney; Robert 
Sullivan; Peter Takacs; Robert Thomas; 
Wendy Thomas; Phil Thompson; Danny 
Tindall 



164 Organizations 




Symphonic 

Wind 
Ensemble 



]ames Allison. Pres.; Keith Bailey; Carrie 
Bean: Steven Benjamin; Tonna Bnbhit: 
]ohn Bryan; Donald Bunch; Karen Camp- 
bell; Mike Carney; Robert Conger; Candy 
Flowers; Scott Gardner; Sandy Gerrior; 
Mike Green; |ohn Goodall; Andrea Har- 
mon; Lowell Harper; Sally Helton; David 
Herring; Alexander Holton; Lisa Huff- 
man, V-Pres.; John Keanon; Leslie Kopp; 
Larry Lambkin; Margaret Latschar; 

Tony McCutchen; Richard McMahan; 
Alan McQuislon; Cheryl Newton; Her- 
bert Owen; Ron Payne; Curtis Pitsen- 
barger; Vince Pitt; David Pollard; Wayne 
Powell; Gail Ramee; Mardee Reed; 
Donna Russell, Mike Sharitz: Tom 
Shields; Steve Skillman; Sam Smith; 
Wayne Strickland; Earl Taylor; Robert 
Thomas; Phil Thompson; Mac Travis; 
Linda Wagner; Mike Walker; Steve Walk- 
er; Susan Zeigler 



1 Mm wfAt-^t 


*2i 




1 Lfcv' INT) 

I ill/ 


1 


% 



University 
Chorale 

Roster not available 



Organizations 165 



University 
Marshals 



|uclv Bass; Doris Burton; |ean Dixon; 
Debra Dodd; Sherry Dussinger; Debbie 
Garris; Wanda |ackson; Susan Kornegay; 
Paula Mitchell; Pam Page; Suzanne Kus- 
sell; Lindsay Sale, Chief Marshal; Diane 
Tavlor; Kay White; Carol W I 












Veterans 
Club 




No picture available 








[ames Adams; Dave Amon; Bernice Bal 

lam e; Millar. 1 It u , Angelo Battista 

Harold Blackmon; Ronald Binkley; [ame 
Bobbit; Carl Brown; Fred Browning 
Hale Canup: Michael Clemons: Con 
Cole; Randall Coniles; George Cook 
Kenneth Cooper; Warren Cottingham 
|en\ W. Cox; Ludford Creef; Eric Criss 
man. 1 lenry ( Irowson; [ames Davis. Pres 
Devin Day: Ken Dees; |ohn Dixon; S. I 
Duncan; Larry Edney: |ames L Edwards 
|im Edwards; [oe Erickson; Mike Ervin 
Donald Fleming: William Fryar, |r 
Glenn Garner; Rick Gilliam; Don Gra\ 
lames Herring: Quentine Hinton; forii 
Hodge. Sei . |oe Holmes; Fred Holt; Davi 




Hope: Walter House; Bill Howe; |ames Paul Nunn; Eric Orders; Rill Outlaw, 
Huggins; Lecter Hyder: George |acobs; Treas.: Chuck Padjett; [ames Pappas; 
Gahlon [ames; Bob [ohanson; Frank )nhn- Al Pai kinson; |ames C Parsons, |r.; Mike 
sen: Allan | |ones; Allan R |ones: David Parsons; |. R Pearson; W. E. Perry; T. R. 
E. [ones; Gregorj |ones: Thomas Kelly; Pierce; Darwyn Pittman; Richard Prev- 

I„irr\ Klutt: Tony Kulesza; Edward ette; 1 G Price; Randj Randolph; 

Kwawnick: Ron Lancaster; Bill Lange; |ames Roarty: Bill Royall; Hob Sauls, 

lames Langley; Jim Lattim ; Bill Laugh- Steven Shephard; Edward Slagle; Hob 

inghouse: Charles Leonard; Grover Sanfield; Tonj A Stanley: Al Stoner; 

1 kamv; William Lovic: |an MacLage; Harrj Stroud: Steve Susan. |ohnnj 

|ohn Maloney: Cleo McCoy; DebbyeMc- Troth; Bobbj tripp: Edwin Trulington; 
Cov; Lee McLaughlin; Hob Marshburn; Greg Verlinden; Hill Vurnackes; E. G. 
Eddie Martin; Edwin 11 Miller. Pete M Walden. V-Pres.; BUI Walker; Fred Wat- 
Miller: Paul Mitchell; Bill Moore; John N. kins; Arl Weatherwax; Dana Webster; 
Musgrave; Tony Murchison; Ken Myers; Edward R Williams; Kenneth Wood 



16B Organizations 




WECU 



Shane Atwell. Program Dir.; Carlton 
Benz, Adv.; Blake Comby. Chief An- 
nouncer; Alan Dehmer, News Dir.; James 
Edwards, Music Dir.; Kevin Leutgens, 
Bus. Mgr.; Thomas McQuaid. Jr.. Gen. 
Mgr ; Sara Miller. Traffic Mgr; [ames 
Perry, Album Dir.; Sven Erik Sieurin. 
Public Service Dir.; Kennen Williams. 
Sales Mgr 




Women's Glee Club 



June Advincula; |ennifer Applewhile; 
Nancy Alkins; Sue Bland; Maureen Boyd; 
Lucy Brown; Karen Burns; Cheri Cam- 
eron; Tracey Case; Mary Council; Aud- 
rey Crown; Madge Dews; Virginia Ed- 
mondson; Carol Edwards: Marcia Faulk; 
|an Folsom; Debbie Frazelle: Janet Gard- 
ner; Kit Griffin; Mary Grover; Karen 
Harloe; Jane Hollingsworth; Cindy Mill- 
ion; Kathy Huggins; Emily Humphreys; 
Karen Keating; Robin Kinlon; Patrice 
Langdon: Mary-Beth McAIister; Linda 
M. 1/ Penny Miller; Barbara Morse: Ja- 
nine Reep; Beverlj Smith; Vickie Spargo; 
Melissa Thrasher; Jeannie Tufo; Janet 
Watson; Leah Wiggins; Rosalee Williams; 
Patsy Wimberly [Photo' courtesy ECU 
News Bureau) 



Organizations 167 



Women's 
Recreation 
Association 

Roste:r not available 




Women's 

Residence 

Council 



Phyllis Bryan; Linda Carrel; KarenCamp- 
bell; Linda Charlier; Felicia Clark; Linda 
Clark; Debbie Dalton. 1st Vice-Chrm.; 
Marj Delamar; Carol Dickens; Anne Dis- 
muckes; Kalhy Drake; Karen Harloe. 
Peggj Harper. Treas.; Calhy Hudson; 
Frankie Lee, Rec Sec . |od\ Mann; Paula 
Merrell; Marilyn McCain; Beverly Par- 
nsh Belly Pennington; Donna Pelerson. 
1st Vice-Chrm.; Delaine Pinkslon; Sheila 
Scott; [anel Sossamon; Tommy Thoma- 
son; Teresa Vivo; Barbara Ward; Jackie 
Whisenhunl 




168 Organizations 




Alpha Beta 
Alpha 

Honorary Library 
Science Fraternity 



Reba Besl: Kay Billiard: |ane Bunch 
Andrea Carlin; Pam Conyers; Janice Cor 
belt: Deborah Sue Cox; Jean Dixnn 
Evern Entwistle; James Erwayi bind. 
Gardner; Ginny Goff; Grace Hammock 
Sharon Harrison; Patricia Knowles; Hel 
en bashua; Jody Mann; Richard Martin 
Billie McDowell; bee McLaughlin; Judy 
Nail; Carol Patterson; Kalhv Phillips 
Beth Punte; Betsy Ronzo; Harriet Rood 
Bri'iida Sanders; binda Stine; |oe Stines 
Brenda Thomas; Alice Wahman; Anne 
Ward; Bert Wells; Peggy Wells; Thomas 
Weisiger; Gloria Williams. Kathryti Wil 
kerson; Anne Woodard 




Alpha Kappa 
Delta 



Honorary Sociology 
Fraternity 



Claude Alley; Jeanne Ballentine; Ray 
Brannon; Patricia Cole; Marvin Daugh- 
erty. Pres.; Charles Garrison; Susie Gut- 
neckl; Barbara Ham; Jenette Joslyn; Youn 
Kim; David Knox; Dianna Morris; Tom 
O'Shea; Phillip Parlin; Buford Rhea; 
Stephen Simmonds; Jerry Sparks; Willi- 
am Stewart; Page Taylor; Paul Tschet- 
ler; Melvin William 



Organizations 169 



Alpha Phi 
Gamma 

Honorary Journalism 
Fraternity 



Ir.i L. Baker, Adv.: Margaret Blanchard; 
Pal Crawford: Phyllis Daughtery; Linda 
Gardner, Sec; Sydney Green, Bailiff; Ed- 
ward Herring; Dr. Erwin Hester: Sandra 
Langley; Glenn Lewis. Treas.: |ani'l 
Loelkes; Christine Mills; Sandra Pen- 
field; Brenda Sanders: Kirk Saunders; 
Mrs. Mary Sorensen; David Swink; Dar- 
rell Williams, Pres. 




Beta Gamma 
Sigma 

Honorary Business 
Fraternity 



Ruth Andrews; ]ohy Arthur; James Bass- 
ler; ]ames Bearden; Larry Bisselle; Linda 
Blackwelder; Dorothy Brandon: Charles 
Broome; Debra Carson; Marshall Col- 
cord; William Collins. Albert Conley; 
Vernon Conyers; Timothy Dameron. V- 
Pres.; Frances Daniels; Pavd Doulton; 
William Durham. |r : Eddie Dullon: Bar- 
bara Edwards; Robert Goodell; A. Mar- 
jorie Harrison. Pres.; [oseph Hill; Rachel 
Ipoch; Kenneth James; Myron Jarman, 
Raymond Jones; Richard Kerns; Tora 
Larsen; Gorman Ledbetter; Harold Mc- 
Grath; Doris McRae; Oscar Moore. Sec- 
Treas.; Ben O'Neal; Gwendolyn Poller; 
Christopher Rice; |oseph Romila; Donald 
Shumaker; Waldrnn Snyder; Paige Ste- 
phen; Jack Thorton; Judson Wike; Louis 
Zincone 




170 Organization 




Chi Beta 
Phi 

Honorary Science 

Fraternity 

Roster not available 




Delta Phi 
Alpha 

Honorary German 
Fraternity 



Ed Bennett; Dr. Carolyn Boll. Adv.; Rosa- 
lind Dupin; |. Robert Dixon; Pa! Ellis; 
Beverly Eubank; Leo Franke; Elaine 
Goldman; Bill Hogarth; Catherine How- 
land, Pres.; Charles Hulka; Michael Hun- 
ter; |udy Huwell; loey Keistler; Bill Mc- 
Ree; Debbie Metzger; Rose Phillips, Sec- 
Treas.; Becky Robinson; Ray Stalon; Al- 
lan Tise; Pauline Tudor, V-Pres.; Barry 
Ward; Doug Weber; Juanelle Wehmer; 
Michael Willis, Co-V-Pres. 



Organizations 171 



No picture available 



TrucK Allen; Elizabeth Austin; Larry 
Benfield, V-Pres.; Harold Brammer; 
Rebecca Brumbeloe; Carmen CI. irk. Ivey 
Chadwick; |an Cooley; Deborah Gratis. 
Pres.; Glenn Eure; Donald Foster; [ohn 
t-'osler; Carol Lynn Hemkamp; Wade 
Hobgood; Susan Humphries; Mary lack- 
son; Dorothj Kee; Brenda Kerby; Bets} 
Lemons; Cindy Lovett; Pat Mann; Susan 
Mason; Elaine Mclntire; Sharon Mum- 
ford; |anice Norlhcutt; Barbara Rogers; 
|anette Schofield; |eanne Scronce, Sec- 
Treas.; Carol Sharp..; Carta Wilmoth 



Delta Phi Delta 



Honorary Art Fraternity 




Gamma Beta Phi 



1 lonorarv Academic Fraternity 



Rebecca Ashby; Pam Boswell; Mark 
Clark; Janice Corbett; Debra Dodd; 
Susan Harris; Bob Hudgins; Gerald Klas, 
Treas.; Sandy Langley; Linda Nielsen; 
Kathy Noyes; June Pate. Historian; Debra 
Patterson; Karen Price; Sharon Renfrow; 
Tom Redding; Delaine Sharp; Ralph 
Smith; Deborah Speas, Sec; Anna 
Slyron. V-Pres.; Debra Taylor; Linda 
Vann; Dwight Waller. Pres.: Wanda 
Ward 



172 Orgonizatio 




GammaTheta 
Upsilon 

Honorary Geography 
Fraternity 



T.E. Austin, Sec.-Treas.; Sandra Brock; 
Paula Davis; Becky Marie Johnson; Mark 
Kuffin; Stephen Moore: Dan Sullivan; 
Vicky Taylor, V-Pres.: EC. Trill. Pres,; 
Robert White 




Kappa Delta 
Pi 

Honorary Education 
Fraternity 



Pam Archer; Joseph Ashworth; J.VV. Bat- 
ten. Treas.; Rebecca Beard; Jean Brant- 
ley: Holly Brenner; Anne Brilt; Kalhy 
Bullock; Jan Clairborne: Dorothy Criss- 
man; Theresa Dewar: Gayle Dickens; 
Jean Dixon; Sandra Dudley, Sec; Mar- 
lene Dunn; Sharon Dussinger; James Er- 
vvay; Sue Fulcher; Cora Mae Garrett. 
2nd V-Pres.; Don Garris; Ron Hartis; 
Rita Hodges: Belly Jo Holland; William 
Huffman: Cathy |ackson; L.C. Jones, 1st 
Y-Pres.; Lynn Joyner; Richard Kaake; 
Charles Keith; Lottie Lassiter; Charles 
Mare; Micki McDougall; Waller Mc- 
Lendon. Pres.: Micky Mioduszewski; Pam 
Pugh; Sherrie Quinley; Mark Royal; 
Mary Shannon: Catherine Smith; Peggy 
Smith; Pat Stallings: Debra Slocks; Deb- 
bie Strickland; Gail Sykes. Hist. -Treas.; 
Elizabeth Tart; N'achiappa Thinakaran; 
Alan Thornquest; Ed Turlington; Sharon 
Uhteg: Linda Wagner; Talmadge Wall: 
Sandra West; Denise Whitaker; Sandra 
Wilson; Sylvia Winchester; Almeta Wool- 
ard; Llewellyn Worsley 



Organizations 173 



National 

Collegiate 

Players 

Judy Townsend 





Omicron Delta Epsilon 

Honorary Economics Fraternity 
Roster not available 



174 Organizations 







Phi Alpha Theta 

Honorary History Fraternity 
Roster not available 






^B MAiHlVJ 1 fir V 




Phi Beta Lambda 

Honorary Business Fraternity 



Mark Carpenter; Elizabeth Col- 
lins: Teresa Creech. Sec; Eddie 
Dutton, Pres.; Bobby Gibbs; Rick 
Gilliam. Treas.; Phyllis Haney; 
T.R. Pierce. V-Pres.: Eric Ripper: 
Bob Royal; Don Rundle; Buddy 
Salter: Bucky Sizemore; Dr. David 
B. Steven. Adv.; Everette Tedder; 
Phyllis Whitney 



Organizations 175 



Phi Epsilon 

Mu 

Honorary Physical 
Education Fraternity 

Roster not available 





Phi Kappa 
Phi 

Honorary Society 



Rulh Andrews; Mary Bailey; Harold Bar- 
dill; Edwin Barllett: Susan Barrow; Mar- 
tha Bcils; Linda Blackwelder; Charles 
Brantley; Debra Brantley; Michael Bret- 
ting; Tony Bright; Nancy Britt; Belinda 
Broome; Betty Buck: Billy Burks; Robin 
Burnette; Waller Calhoun; Debra Carson; 
Marie Chamblee; Mary Clement; Vernon 
Corners; Paula Davis; Steven Deberry; 
Joanna Dempsey; Theresa Dewar; 
Sandra Dudley; Lewis Dulton; Barbara 
Edwards; Phyllis Ellenberg; William 
Fowler; Leo Franke; Carolyn Greene; 
Barbara tlam; ]oel Hancock; Sophia Har- 
kins; Susan Harper; Emily Harrison; 
Karen Haskell; Susan Heje; Georgette 
Hedricks; Rila Hodges; Brenda Holden; 
Russell Holmes; Margaret Home; Cath- 
erine Howland; Nancy Hudson, Teresa 
Hunt; Rachel [pock; Becky |ohnson; |oe 
Keeter; Emily Kirk; Elizabel Kos'zulinski; 



Alice Lancaster; Marion Lehman; Bar- 
bara Lewis; Can McComber; Donna Mil- 
ler; Sarah Moore; |une Pate; William 
Perry: Ellen Phlegar; Cynthia Pierce; 
Patricia Poslel; Linda Rains; janine Reep; 
Christopher Rice; Daniel Roalh; ,Linda 
Robbins; Brenda Roberson: Harriet Rood; 
Alice Rose: Sara Sagar; Diane Sardella; 
Mary Savage; Shirley Smallwood; Clar- 
issa Smith; Marlha Sparrow; Joe Stines; 
Anna Styron; Irvin Swain; Mary Tadlock; 
Debra Taylor; Susanna Thompson: Eu- 
nice Trammell; Elisa Troutman; Nancy 
Troutman: Warren Van Male; Gregory 
Verlinden; Robert Voight; Linda Wagner: 
Rosemary VValdron: Wanda Ward; Mary 
Weaver; Margaret Wells; |udith Wheel- 
er; Barbara While; |anel Whillev; Henry 
Wilhite; Martha Wolfe; Almeta Woolard: 
Marj Worrell; Patricia Vow; Linda Zur- 
face 




PhiMu 
Alpha 

Honorary Music Fraternity 



]im Allison; Gars Beachamp; Don Carn- 
ohan; Sid Clark; Alan Davis: Tal Faunt- 
leroy; Lowell Harper. Brian Hoxie; Fred 
Hurley; Tim |ewell; Ton) McCulchen; 
Craig Mills. Pres.; Ron Payne, Treas.; 
Wayne Powell, Sec . Hill Reinhart: Tom 
Richards; Bobb) Sullivan, V-Pres . 
Charles Taylor; Dale Tucker; Sieve Walk- 
er: Keith Wriuht 




Ed Bartlett; Mill Beckner: led Bost: [ohn 

Brown; William Brown; Ron Binkle\ . 
Barry Bailey; Tom Clare; Will Creech; 
Steve Deberry; Bill Edwards: David Eng- 
lert; Bill Fowler; David Mains; Braxton 
Hall: Tom Harrington: David House; L.C. 
|ones: Meal Lipke; Boh Marcke: Chuck 
Maxwell. Bill Murphy: Fred Obrecht; 
Bob Ponda; Bill Phipps; Mike Pillman; 
Vernon Summerall: Gar) Salt; Bruce 
Silberman; Cliff Trill; Fred West, |ames 
Westmoreland: Worth Worthington: |ohn 
Walton: Terry Thompson; Mike Wilson; 
Greg Verlinden; Bobby Vail; [ames 
Shame 



Phi Sigma Pi 



Scholastic 1 lonorary Society 



Organizations 177 




Phi Upsilon 
Omicron 

Honorary Home 
Economics Fraternity 



Diana Adams: Dianne Baker; Marilyn 
Barfield; Mary Beaman; Mary Bell; Mari- 
lyn Bottoms; Kathy Bryan; Alice Buffa- 
loe; ]anice Burroughs; Martha Byrd; 
Mary Ellen Carawan; Linda Charlier; 
Mary Clement; Leah Curie; Evelyn Dail; 
Donna Davidson; Wanda Dickerson; 
Pamela Eakins; Sherry Garris; Sandra 
Garrett: Susan Harris; Judy Hartwell; 
Emily Harding; Wanda |ackson; Doris 
Kincade; Alice Lancaster; Connie Las- 
kowski; Carol Lennon; Glenda Marsh; 
Yvonne Marlindale; Rose Massey; Caro- 
lyn Mayo; Helen McMillan; Laveita Mer- 
rill; Deborah Midget!; Katie Moore; 
Linda Morgan; Ann Mowbray; Linda 
Nielson; Julin Oliver; Linda Overby; Ann 
Parsley; Beverly Pegram; |oan Pilcher; 
Angela Rich; Linda Robbins; Ebbie Rog- 



erson; Kay Smith; Elizabeth Taylor; Het- 
lie Wallace: Joselyn White; Carolyn Wil- 
liams; |ulia Wilson; Carol Wood; Cyn- 
Ihia Wood; Susan Wood: Claudia Yealts: 
Ruth Lambie, Advisor; ]anis Shea, Ad- 
visor; Miriam Moore. Advisor; Initiates 
— |ackie Allen; David Angel; Genie 
Brann; |nhnnie Crosby; Nancy Gautier; 
Carolyn Hadley; Gretchen Heid; Patricia 
Herman; Susan Herring; )ulie Hulsey; 
Gena Johnston; Dianne Joyner; Jessica 
Manning; Carolyn Mansfield; Louise Mc- 
Allister; Judith Moir; Mary Jo Nason; 
Patricia Nelson; Gail Riddle; Debra Run- 
nion; Carol Sloan; Nan Smith; Carolyn 
Stewart; Angela Tripp; Sherry Troulman; 
Martha Wade; Jane Woodley; Sylvia Zel- 
kin 



Pi Omega 
Pi 

lonorarv Business Society 



Joan Bass, V-Pres.; Frances Daniels; Gail 
Hester. Historian. Ellen McGowan. 
Treas.; Jimmy Smith. Pres.; Patricia 
Stallings. Sec; Denise Whilaker; Llew- 
ellyn Worsley, Hist. 




J78 Organizutions 




Pi Sigma 
Alpha 

Honorary Political 
Science Fraternity 



George Bedsvvorth; Sandra Blackwell; 
Ronny Brown; Pat Crawford; )ames M. 
Cronin; James Davis; John Dixon; Terry 
Everett; Grier Ferguson; Susan Gerlach: 
Joel Hancock; David Harringlon; Chrislo- 
pher Hay; Joseph Henderson; Billie Jo 
Hobson; Katherine Home; Randy Hud- 
son; Scott Keter; Martha Kellam; Craig 
Krupa; Kathy Langan; Edwina Lee; Bill 
Little; Robert Lucas; Sybil Moody; ]ames 
Nail; |ohn Narron; Oral Parks; Mike Par- 
sons; Gary Naylor; Becky Robinson; Bert 
Sessoms; Thomas Schubert; Craig Thorn- 
ton; Juanelle Wehmer; James Westmore- 
land; Edward Wheeler 




Psi Chi 

Psychology Fraternity 



Alice Ahrens; Gay Alexander; Sarah An- 
ama; Donna Armstrong; Kathryn Auman; 
William Baker; Deborah Bannister; Ha- 
rold Bardill; Nan Battle; ]ane Beaman; 
Norma Beaman; Sharyn Bennett. |nn 
Benlz; Cathy Briley; Belinda Broome; Ka- 
ren Bumgardner; Patty Burke; Karen Bur- 
rus; Susan Campbell; Diane Carlson; Ed- 
na Cascioli; John Chase; Murrv Chesson; 
|ohn Childers; Thomas Clare; Henry 



Clark; Rhonda Clark. Library Chrm.; 
Martha Clopton; Patricia Cole; Roger 
Cole; Lola Comer; Donna Corey; Beverly 
Cotten; Terry Craig; Larry Crandall; Jane 
Dameron; Minnie Daughterly; Fred 
Davenport; Stephen Davis; Kathryn Den- 
ny; Charles Edward; Carolyn Eggers; 
Ronald Eggers; Phyllis Ellenberg; Marj 
Ellis; Mary Ellison; Mary Faulkner; Pa- 
tricia Finch; Steven Flora; |ean Fogleman; 
Richard Flowers; Richard Formaini; 
Nancy Frazelle; Arnold Fruliger; Lewis 
Gidley; Sharon Girardey; Richard Good- 
ling: Katherine Green; Sharon Green; 
William Grossnickle; Monty Grubb; David 
Hains. Pub. Chrm.; Denise Hall; Barbara 
Ham; Alice Hamshar; Thomas Harrell: 
Robert Hartis; Karen Haskett. Pres.; Pat- 
sie Hasty; Larry Haves; Myree Haves; 
Kurt Helm: Rebecca Helms;' Bruce Hen- 



derson; |acqueline Hill; Mary Hill; Rita 
I lodges; Lecler Hyder: John Ingram; Mary 
Ipock; Robert James; Allan Jones; Willi- 
am Johnston; Mary Kelly: Paul Kelly: 
Kermil Keeter; Joseph Keyes; Gary King: 
Vivian Kirkpatrick: Fernand Landry; 
Carmella Lane; Rosina Lao; James Lash- 
ley; Vann Lathan; Helen Lauderhaus; 
Lena Lee; Thomas Long; Nancy Light; 
Larry l.undy; Bonnie Lunsford; Charlotte 
Lynch; Louise McAlisler; Wanda Maqur- 
ean; Victor Mallenbaum; Ronald Man- 
son; Cathy Marlowe; Tom Marsh; E.T. 
Martocia; Nancy Matthews; Jerry May- 
nor; Jeanetle Meadows; Marcy Meurs; 
Charles Mitchell; Alan Mobley: Robert 
Montaquila; Cynthia Newby; Max Nun- 
ez; William Obrecht; Margaret O'Neal; 
James Osberg; Thomas O'Shea: Alton 
Patrick; Cynthia Peterson; Lloyd Pettus; 
Gail Phillips; Thomas Phillips; William 
Phipps, Treas.; Virginia Pierpoint, Sec; 
Robert Poole; Diana Prescott; Frank Pre- 
vail; Clinton Prewetl; Brian Riley: Linda 
Rose; Bobbe Rouse; Suzanne Sadler: 
James Silva; Eileen Slater; Clarissa 
Smith; Robert Spence: Jay Steinberg; 
Detir.i Slocks. Randolph Stokes; Deborah 
Strayer; James Sluarl; Martha Stuckey; 
David Swink; James Taylor; Kathleen 
Taylor; Alan Thornquest; Robyn Timber- 
lake; Nancy Troutman; Susan Turner; 
Robert Vail; Brian Van Dercook: Miriam 
Wallace, V-Pres.; Frances Walters; Ann 
Waring; William Watson; Art Weather- 
wax; Judy While; Richard While; Robert 
Whiteside; Sam Williams; Patricia Wil 
lis; Cynthia Wilson; Kenneth Wright; 
Harry Youngblood 



Organizations 179 



Sigma Alpha 
Iota 



Professional Fraternih 
for Women in Music 



[onell Anderson; Carrie Bean, Chaplai 
Shirle> Blandino; Kalhryn Finklea; Ca 
d\ Flowers; Donna Grose, Pres.; Sal 
Helton, Sgt.-al-Arms; Connie King; Li 
lie Kopp, Assl Treas.; Linda Metz, 1 
V-Pres.; Carole Miller; Linda Montagu 
Corr, Sec; Cheryl Newton, Ed : Debh 
Rhodes; Donna Russell, Ed . Bevei 
Runs,', Treas.; Pal Shannon; Suzani 
Shepherd; Debbie Stokes, 2nd V-Pre; 
Ellen Reithmaier.Adv 





ren Bezanson; Mark Blalock; Dr William 
Bloodworth; Angie Bonner; Doug Burch; 
Sam Byer, Hist,; Bennett Cole; [ohn 
Crawley; Carolyn Davis; Leigh Duque; 
Wan. la Edwards, Sei . Mr- Nellvena 
Eutsler; Mrs Nell Everett; Mi Paul Fair, 
Mrs Marie Kan, |ill Fitzgerald; Pat Flem- 
ing; [oel Fogleman; Pal Fountain. Treas . 
Barbara Hall; Georgette Hedrick; Diane 



i Hutcherson; |anel Kem- 
per; Sand) Langley; |oAnne Latino: Gary 
McCullough; Dr Douglas McMillan. 
Adv ; Mrs Dorothj Mills; Carolyn Mob- 
ley: Dr, Frank Motley; Douglas Noble: 
Pam Page. Pres : Sidne> Reams; Shirlej 
Smallwood; Fir Malcolm South; Teresa 
Speight; Harold Stephens; Ruin Wade, 
V-Pres . Cvnthia Williams; Linda Woolen 



Sigma Tau 
Delta 

Honorary English 
Fraternity 



180 Organi 




Barbara Adams; Diane Aldridge; Sandra 
Alphin; Edith Averelle: Carolyn Barnes; 
Frances Bennett; M. Lee Bennett; Clau- 
dia Benzon: Audrey Biggers; Riilh Broad- 
hurst; Teresa Burl; Donna Cederberg; 
Helen Chamblee; Donna Dorsey; Sarah 
Flanary; I. ana Foushee; Beebe Frazer; 
Faye Freeze; Judy Garrison: Ida Gaskill; 
Peggy Grinds; Louise Haigwood; Rachel 
Hall; Bettie Hooks; Dayne Howell; Va- 
linda Isenhower; Dorothy Jenkins: Es- 
lelle Johns; Jackie Jones: [eanette [ones; 
Sue Jordan; Frances Krom; Judy Kuy- 
kendall; Elaine I, affile, iu; Theresa Law- 
ler; Charlotte Martin; Phyllis Martin; 
Inez Martinez; Dottie McGee; Katherine 
McKinley; Valerie Miller; Ina Modlin; 
Ellen Morion: Lenore Morion; Edith My- 



ers; Diana Nelson; Peggy Nelson; Ph\ 1 
Nichols; Linda Noel; Nancj Odham; je 
Owens; Barbara Oyler; Frances Parkt 
Virginia Payne; Mallie Penrv; Evel 
Perry; Eldean Pierce: Sarah Pike; Fra 
i es I'm ler; Deborah Price: Karen Prii 
Cathj Prince; Lona Ratcliffe; Robbie Ri 
die; Chris Riley; Emily Rivenbark; Lini 
Schmehl; Susan Shaw. Sylvene Spicki 
man, Nancy Stevenson; Karen Tillwii 
Donna Thigpen; Jacklyn Travis; [05 
Turnage; [udj Viereck; Bonnie Waldro 
Sharon Walker; Pats) Wallace; Eva Wi 
ren; Patricia Wenkman; Alia Whale 
Elizabeth While: Martha Wolfe; Pali a; 
Worthington; [eannie Yount; Patric 
Yow; Artista Zangas 



Sigma Theta 
Tau 

Honorary Nursing Society 




Full Members - Carl Adler: Charles 
Bland; David Bosley: |oseph Boyette; 
Dudlej Bryant; Hubert Burden; Tilden 
Hun us; Mj ran I )aspai . Donald Clemens; 
Hal Daniel; Graham Davis; Gerald'Dohm; 
Grover Everett; Robert Fulghum; Teddy 
Grindslaff; William Grossnickle: Carolyn 
Hampton; Edward Haseley; Dean Hay- 
ek; Christine Helms; Elvin Holslius; 
Takeru Ito; Donald Jeffreys; William 
Jones; Richard Kerns; Roberl Lamb; li- 
vin Lawrence; Joseph LeConte; James 
Lemley; lean Lowry; Warren McAllis- 
ter; Richard McCorkle; |ames McDaniel; 
Susan McDaniel; Terence McEnally; Joe 
McGee: John McLean: Edgar Meibohm: 
Huyh Pallerson; Garland Ponderer. i|)h; 
David Phelps; Norwin Pierce; T11II10 Pig- 
nani; Edward Ryan; Thomas Sayetta; 
M.R, Schvveisthal; Alice Scotl; Preni Seh- 
gal; lames Sherer; Rob, at Tai kei Pei- 
Lin Tien; Paul Varlashkin: Ml. niche Wat- 
rous; Georjje Weigand; Wallace Wooles; 
Associate Members Ramesh Ajmera; 
Wendall Allen. Donald Barnes; Francis 
Belcik; Vincent Bellis; Bobby Bishop; 
lack Brinn; Byron Coulter. Charles Gil- 
bert; Carlton Heckrotte; lames Hix: Wil- 
liam Hume; Albert |ennings; Roberl 
\la\ : Stanley Riggs; Everetl Simpson 
Local Members Lokenath Debnath; 

Gray Richardson; Roberl Hursey, h 
Roberl Klein. Richard Weimar. Jr.. Ed- 
win Monroe; Milam |ohnson; Pat Dau- 

ghertj . V 1 Hough Kim. William Spick- 

erman; Charles 1 ('Rear; Sam Pennington; 
Dorothv Lemles 



Sigma Xi 

Honorary Science 
Research 
Fraternity 



Organizotii 




Alpha Delta Pi 



Susan Anderson; Allyson Andrews; 
Nancy Bagley; Nancy Bashford. Sec; 
Dana Bishop; Dewey Bryant; Robin Clark; 
Pam Coley; Amy Collelle; Ann Collros; 
Tish Daniel; Brenda Eagles; Blair Everett; 
|anet Ferebee; Jean Forrest; Cindy Free- 
man; Shawn Gallagher; Karol Hart; Jan 
Heindenreich; Nancy Higginson: Gret- 
dien |efferson: Beth l.ockamy; l.inda 



Lyons; Susie Macon; Faye Maness. 
Treas.; Arlyne McCarthy; Mary Kemp 
Mebane; Connie Minges, Pledge Tr.; 
Carol Morgan: Annelle Piner; Sandy 
Sanker; Mary-Jo Saunders; Nancy Saun- 
ders; Lyn Stewart; Susan Temple; Beth 
Todd. V. Pres.; Teresa Tultle; |udy Weth- 
erington; DiAnna VVhitaker. Pres.; Connie 
Wrenn. 




Sheila Bunch; Linda Clark; Aldriche 
Davidson: Gloria Fisher, Treas.; Mary 
Fisher; |ackie Hawkins; Cynthia Henly; 
Janice Hobbs, Corr Sec; Lena Lee; 
Marolyn Manly; Debby McCoy. V. Pres.; 
Annie Morris, Rec Sec; Cvnthia Newbv; 
Mildred Ramsey; Willie Settle; Shirley 
Smallwood, Presidenl 







182 ( Irganizations 




Marly Boyan; Myra Cooper; Diane Dean; 
Joanne Dobson; Jo Anne Egerlon; Mary 
Anne Egerton: Barl)ara Floyd; Lanelte 
Getsinger. Corr. Sec; Teri Hanrahan; 
Faye Hightower; Leslie Jones; Deborah 
Knowles; Donna Lawson; Cathy Manley; 
Charlotle Marshburn; Tricia Martino; 
Lvnne Massengill; Ann Melvin; Undine 
Miller; Vicki Miller; Karen Moore. Pres : 



Marsha Murphey, Treas.; Barbara Over- 
cash; Jenny Pale; Kalhy Pinyoun; Pam 
Reganhardt: Debbie Rogers, Rec. Sec; 
Rhonda Ross; Cindy Saver; Jane Schiller; 
Cher Sheppard; Debbie Strickland, V. 
Pres.; Carol Wedel; Betty While: Leigh 
Williams: Kate Woolen; Pat Yow; Kathv 
Pechal 



Alpha Omicron Pi 




Becky Ackert; Dianne Aycock; Barmen 
Barber; Anita Bass; Sheryl Bayer; Ste- 
phanie Beauchaine; Sharyn Bennett; Di- 
anne Bowen: Jane Bunch; Barbara Car- 
ter; Kathy Charlelon; Karen Colquitt. V. 
Pres.; Gail Conoly; Glenda Denton; Kar- 
en Ellsworth, PL Trainer; Susan Fish; 
Sally Freeman; Karla Fuller; Linda Gard- 
ner, Treas.; Patty Hilo; Kaki King; Pat 
Krauss; Sherry Lewis; Jo Van Lockwood; 
Donna Lynch; Cvnlhia McNeil; Candie 



Marcellus; Ramona Meachum; Lynne 
Mitchell; Susan Mooney. Rec. Sec; San- 
dy Penfield; Angela Pennino; Johanna 
Reich; Karen Romer; Brenda Sanders, 
Pres.; Sandra Saver; Peggy Shcarbach; 
Linda Shull; B.J. Slarling; Rosalynn 
Strowd; Angela Tripp; Peggy Upchurch; 
Jenny Warren; Susan Walton; Cheryl 
Willard; Gail Williams; Vivian Williams; 
Rebecca Winston 




Organizations 183 




James Adams; Gregory Carter; Jame; 
Carter; Kenneth Gilbert; Palmer Lasane 
Charlie Lovelace, V- Pres.; Larry Malone 
lames Mitchell, Pres.; Delma Moore 
Tommy Patterson. Sec; Jose Ramos 
Treas.; Tyrone Williams 





APO FRATERNITY 
WELCOMES 
GOVERNOR HOLSHOUSER 



Rick Balak; Dennis Barrick; Larry Bis- 
sette: )ohn Bogatko; Doug Davenport; 
|im Godfrey. Pres.; Sieve Hayes; Tom 
lamieson, Treas.; Bob Krainiak. Mike 
Mahne; Greg McLeod, 2nd V. Pres.; Ben- 
nie Meeks; Glen Miller; Mike O'Brien; 
Greg Pace. 1st V. Pres.; Gene Riddle; 
Danny Scott; Al Solier; Jackie Spright; 
Vic Stanfield. Bill Swanson; Bill Taylor; 
Mel Toler; Steve West. Sec. 




18$ Organizations 





Debbie Ainsworlh: Donna Armstrong. 
Cor. Sec; Ginger Avery; Denise Brewer; 
Cam Brown. V. Pres.; Paula Browning; 
Janice Burroughs; Anna Carson; Lucy Co- 
ward, Rec. Sec; Teresa Culbreath; Ma- 
hala Dees. Pres.; |udy Eargle; Lydia Fer- 
guson; Diane Gerrior: Sandy Gerrior; 
Kathy Greene; Rosanne Hager; Penny 
Hall; Mary Alice Holt, PI. Trainer; Linda 
Harrell; Linda Hoff; Palricia Huff; Ellen 
Kelly; Cindy Kornegay; Sherry Killen; 
Carolyn McMillan; Joyce Mudrock, Tre- 
as.; Tona Price; Sharon Overby; Lynn 
Reville: Becca Robinson; Rose Ann Rob- 
inson; Nancy Sellers; Frances Shellon; 
Beth Skillman: Lynda Simmons; Dale 
Wilson; Kav Wiman; Nancy Wiman Les- 
lie Wyatl 




Ann Bass; ]oan Bass; Gayle Best; Brenda 
Calhoun; Mamie Cicerone; Vickie Cutts; 
Debra Dodd; Diana Goettman. Treas.; 
Sandy Langley; Nancy Morgan, Pres.; 
Kathy Noyes; Kathy Owens; Sharon Ren- 
fron; Cathy Robinson; |ane Shelterly. 
Sec; Margaret Skinner; Betsy Suggs; 
Kathy Taylor, V. Pres.; Lou Anne Taylor; 
Ellen Blackwell; Mary Campbell; Lisa 
Davis; Peggy Farr; Linda Briffin. Rush 
Chrm.; Lydia Hagna; Susan Harris; Anita 



Luper; Missy Manley; Janice Moore; 
Linda Nielsen; Debbie Patterson, PI. Tr.: 
Gail Phillips; Debbie Roe. House Man.; 
Debbie Runnion; Vickie Vaughan; Hettie 
Wallace; Gladys Wylie; Cathy Callihan; 
Kim Campbell; Frankie Carter; Kathy 
Carter; Nancy DeMeter; Tama Flaherty; 
Kim Kuzmuk; Elizabeth Nelson; |ean 
Ramey; Daria Saitta; Rita Waring; Minn 
Whiteside; Joanne Wilfert; Sherran 
Brewer; Leslie Moore 



Chi Omega 



( Irganizations 185 




Delta Sigma Phi 



Edward Barnes, Sec; Sam Boyd; John 
Englehart; Kevin Evans. V. Pres.; Larry 
Evans, Treas.; Rod Freeze; Burl Gibbs; 
Doug Gourley; Billy Greene; Gene Grazi- 
osi; Stan Hall; Steve Horner; Buzz John- 
son; Michael Laney; Doug Miller; Win- 



ston Mayhew; Steve Micham; Tom Per- 
rin; Percy Perry; Wesley Price; Larry 
Ray; David Reavis; Art Richard. Ill; 
Brady Sadak; |ohn Scidel, Sgt.-at-Arms; 
Ricky Teague; BobThorsen; Wavne Woo- 
kv: Barbara Wells. Sweetheart 




Delta Sigma Theta 



Renee Andrews; Joyce Bouknight; Carol 
Caldwell; Eldred Clemons; Veronica Co- 
burn. Treas.; Debbie Collins. Corr. Sec. 
Mamie Davis; Linda Ebron; Janice Jakes 
Pat (ones; Louise Jenkins; Kathy McLead 
Harriette McCullers; Naomi Newton. V 
Pres.; Denise Patterson; Edna Roundtree 
Linda Simpson; Terry Thompson. Pres. 
Veronica Ward; Shirley Washington 
Gloria Williams', Rec. Sec. 



186 Organizations 




Ann Carrow; Jackie Cashio; Celesl Dick- 
ens; Gilda Engiman; Jeannie Hagan; Em- 
ma Lou Hannon; Joan Harrison; Beannie 
Hembree; Pam Hemenway; Lynn Hohbs; 
Kathy (ones; Marilyn Mann; Alice Ma- 
thern; Patty McMahon; Baldwin Mor- 
ris; Casey Parsons; Donna Peterson; Pam 
Plant; Loretta Russo; Lindsay Sale; Carol 
Sharpe; Robin Stover; Karen Vreeland; 
Rhonda Walker; Dena Webb; Emilv Wil- 



Gamma SigmaSigma 





Lee Askew: Rass Bagley; Richard Bil- 
bro; Jack Blackburn; |immy Bond: |im 
Buckman; Donnie Bonn; Rick Byrd; Mike 
Carter; John Calhoun; Craig Cox; David 
Diehl; Chris Furlough. Pres.; Radford 
Garrett; Rip Graham; Robin Greenwood; 
Bill Harper: Hugh Hawfield; Kevin Hen- 
don; Jock Hernig; Chuck Hester; Marty 
Holmes: Skay House; Ben |ames; Leo- 
nard Jones: Charlie Knight; Chick Lamb; 
Fred Lemmond; Bill Lipscomb; Ernie 
Massei; Al Nichols, V. Pres.; Sandy 
Peele; Van Powell; Kevin Pric; Fred Proc- 
tor. Corr. Sec; Mike Roberson; John 
Robertson; John Rodman; John Stauffer. 
Bert Stewart; Donald Taylor; Ronald Tay- 
lor. Par.: Bruce Tillery, Rec. Sec; Jimmy 
Todd. Historian; Biixtun Turner, Treas.; 
Pete West; David Wilson 



Organizations 187 




Elizabeth Caldwell; Kathy Caslon, Rush 
Chrm.: Renea Complon; Linda Cox; Su- 
san Craig. Asst. Treas.; Debbie Dawson; 
Dilly Dills; Kathy Fahrenbruch; Charlene 
Gerguson; Debbie Fridle; Martica Grif- 
fin; Kalhy Gentry: Denise Hall: Kathy 
Koonce; Nancy Light; ]anet Loelkes; 
Mary Loughran; Dianne Lucas; Bit Lun- 
dy. Ed.; Patrice Myers; Patti Myers. 
Treas.; Gail Nixon; Martie Pendleton. 
Sec; Robin Pomeroy; Becky Richardson; 
Donna Riggs; Chris Riley, Pres.; Meredith 
Shaw; Kathy Sheehan; Elizabeth Slocks, 
V. Pres.: Donna Suggs; Rita Towns; Mary 
Wilson; Pam Wright 





Kappa Sigma 



Bill Balchelor: Ed Balson; David Bradley- 
Bob Brantley; Mark Brodsky; David Bul- 
lock; Sam Byrer, Grand Master; Carl 
Cobb; Jim Collins: Buddy Daves; Leo 
Derick; Mike Deutsch; Tim Dew; Grier 
Ferguson; |im Godwin; Tom Hancock; 
Punky Hardman; Richard Harris; Bobby 
Johnson: Steve Kluttz; Chuck Mahaffey; 
Keith Mangun; Tom Matthews; Tom Mc- 
Cann. Grand Scribe; Bill McGee; Allen 
McKae: Steve Moore; Mark Newton; Bill 



Parks; Mike Parsley; Randy Poindexter 
Bill Price; Grant Ralston; Chris Ripper 
Grand Treas.; Eric Ripper; Scott Rhodes 
Greg Rouse: Don Rundle; Don Sanders 
|oey Sanders; Dennis Sarrell; Keith Siler 
Bucky Sizemore; John Staley; Mike Ste 
adman; Greg Sparks; Bob Sullivan; Art 
Taylor; Steve Thompston; Jim Towe; 
Tommy Vicars, Grand Procurator; Park 
Warne; |ohn Wharton; Mike White. Mas- 
ter of Cer.; Ken'Windley; George Wood 



188 Organizations 




Jaime Austria; |ames Beachan; Bill Burn- 
ett; Stephen Boyette; Chuck Clodfelter; 
Blake Comhy; David Cottle; Doug Coyle. 
Fret. Ed.; Bub Cox. Rush Chrm.; David 
Crawford; Jerry Cunningham, V. Pres.; 
Glenn Cutrell; Ken Dickerson. House 
Mgr.; Richard Drogos; Fraysure Fulton; 
Stuart Gaines; Hubert Gibson, Treas.; 
David Gies; Glenn Groves; Gregg Gul- 



ghum; Gil Hendrix. Ritualist; James In 
gram; Schol. Chrm.; David Jarema; Bil 
Lackey; Thomas Matthews: Rick Mitch 
ell; Andy Schmidt. Soc. Chrm.; Portei 
Shaw. Pres.; Mike Stout; Vern Strother 
Dan Tew. Pub. Chrm.; John Thomas 
Luke Vaii, Sec; Tommy Way; Brownit 
Wilson; James Wilson; Steve Younl 



Lambda Chi 
Alpha 




Omega Psi 
Phi 



Cednc Dickerson; Eddie Dungee; Jackson 
Farrar; Willie Harvey. Chaplain; Dennis 
Humphrey; Maurice Huntley. V. Pres.; 
Michael Jones, Pres.; Alvin Joyner; C.R. 
Knight. Marshall McAden. Treas.; Dalton 
Nicholson; Gary Phillips: Les Strayhorn 



Organizations 189 




Phi Kappa Tau 



|ohn Ammons; Jeff Becker; Bill Benson; Lynch; Bruce Mann, V-Pres.; Keith Mc 

|im Byrd; John Carpenter, Sec; Mike Kinney; Dave Plyler; Billy Rippy; Bobby 

Cascio, Treas.; Tim Chambers; Ray Ch- Rippy, Pres.; Mike Russell; ]ack Snypes 

urch. Sgt.-at-Arms; Glenn Crilcher; Kim Timmy Stephenson; Gary Stone; Georgt 

Dudleck; Warren Hardin; Chris Isley; Stuphin; Bruce Terrell; Thad Thornton 

Greg Ingalls; Bill |ones; |immy Kauro- Andrew Wheeler; Rick Wynn 
halious; Leslie Knight; Butch Long; |ohn 




Pi Kappa Phi 



Mike Bass; Keith Beatty; Waller Benton; 
Daryll Braswell; Bob Brewster; Jesse 
Brown; Reynolds Calvert; John Coble; 
George Daniels; |ack Dill in: Carl Ealy; 
|ohn Evans; Mark Fackrell; |im Forshaw; 
Mike Gerber; John Gunnells; Robert 
Hacknev; Bill Hardwood; Ed Harris; 
Sonny Hart; Hill Heard; Tom Henson; 
1 1, in -v 1 lelmer; Terry Hodge; Randv Hug- 



gins; Larry Huston; Nathan Kelly; Wayne 
King; Andy Kozel; Eddy Lassiter; Rick 
Llewellyn; Jay Lucas; Rodney McDonald; 
Milton McLamb; Fred Morton; John 
Rambo; Keith Rockwell: Bill Shelton 
Brian Sibley; Craig Sink; Reed Spears 
Griff Vincent; Mark Walser; Eric Walker 
Hank Wvlie 



190 Organizations 




Pi 

Lambda 

Phi 



Joe Bicldell; Don Christian; Keith Cline; 
Fred Cohen; Robert Cutler. Pres.; Kelly 
Davenport; Kenny Davis. Marshal; |im 
Dickson; Ray Edwards; Ronnie Ferrell; 
Hal Finch; Steve Gordon; Phil Lanier. V. 
Pres.; Blaine Lucas, Scribe; Terry Lucas; 
Pal Minges; Chuck Monson. Treas.; Rick 
Nipper; Wayne Price; Sandy Retchin; Bill 
Shreve; Wayne Stephens 




Sigma Phi 
Epsilon 



Brett Bean; Paul Blust. Rec. Sec; Thomas 
Brown; Tony Burden; Bob Cande; Bub 
Carr, Corr. Sec; Ed Crotts; ]im Dwyer; 
Steve Faris; David Fields; Bobby Hailh- 
cox; Ian Hollander; Birdie Johnson; Mike 
Johnson; Avery Jones; Bob Joyce. V. 
Pres.; Gray Kimbell; Jergl Leonard; Bill 
Messer. Pres.; Jeff Miller; Howard Mon- 
tague; John Moore; Ken Morin; Rockv 
Nelson; Kirk Thayer; Tom Ward; Bill 
Willis, Treas 



Organizations 191 




Sigma Sigma 
Sigma 



Cincy Ange. V. Pres.; Roxanne Arlin; Gail 
Allison; Ann Baird; Lesa Bell; Harriet 
Brinn; Regina Bullock; |ennifer Carr. 
Pres.; Carol Cox, Corr. Sec; Cathy Dam- 
eron; Carol Deardorff; Sue Farmer; |ulia 
Ann Gibson; Karen Greiner: Pal Harri- 
son; Inglis Holcomb; Kathy Hollowell; 



Chr 



Sus 



Ginny Hubard; Robin lame 



Rus 



|ohnson, Sch Chrm ; Diane 
]oyner, Rec. Sec; Jayne Key; Sharon 
Marion; Laura McFall; Tana Nobles. 
Treas.; Allison Plaster; Susan Quinn; |o 
Ann Ragazzo; Tommie Robertson; Lynn 
Rodd; Louisa Sims; [oan Singleton: Lynn 
Slughler; Marlyse Smith; Liz Tart; Lisa 
Turner; Terri Wachler 




Syd Bailey. Pres.; Kirk Bass; Eddie Bat- 
chelor: John Beal; |ohn Beard; Steve 
Beard; Bill Beddingfield. Pledge Tr.; Ed- 
die Boger; Brian Brantley; |immy Butler; 
|oe Chesson; Tom Chipak; Collins Coop- 
er; Bob Curlee; Larry Curry, V. Pres.; 
Jerry Gardner; Eric Gomo; Rodney Gray; 
John Grinnell; Bryon Haddock; Jimmy 
Hahn; Johnny Holland; Lee Howe, Chap- 
lain; Jeff Hulchens; Dwayne Ingram; Joe 
Johnson; Tommy Johnson; Doil Killman; 
Widgie Kornegay; Phil Mahoney, Sec; 
Al Meeks: Tom Norman; Gary Owens; 
Terry Purkson; Bob Saunders; Pat Sulli- 
van; Arnold Wallace; Kennen Williams; 
Russell Wilson: Glenn Wood; Nancv 
Wood. Sweetheart 




192 Organizations 



HARRINGTON 



• r <J: 



I '^-t 



ij-:^^^'jir 



Garv Averilte; Geoff Beaston; Wayne 
Bland. |ohn Bullard; Mike Burbank; Dan- 
ny Carpenter; Norman Davis; Terry Dur- 
ham; |ack Elkins; Bob Feeney; Tommy 
Fleetwood; Bill Godwin; Bobby Harrison; 
Joe Heavner: Steve Herring; Mike Her- 
ring; Mike Hogan; Dave LaRussa; Ronnie 
Leggett; Rick McMahon; Randy Monroe; 
John Narron; Russ Smith; Ron Slaggs; 
Carl Summerell 



Baseball 



Basketball 



Varsity — Greg Ashorn; Roger Atkinson; 
Buzzy Braman; Robert Geter; Kenny Ed- 
wards; Larry Hunt; Reggie Lee: Tom 
Marsh; Chuck Mohn; Donnie Owens: 
Tom Quinn. Coach; Nicky White 
Jr. Varsity — Tiim Brogan; Robert Carra- 
way; Charlie Durham; Dickie Flye; Steve 
Harris; Al McCrimmons; Harry Miller; 
Larry Modlin; Craig Pugh; Tom Twitty. 
Coach; Tommy Williams; Tyrone Willi- 




Orgamzations 193 




Women's Basketball 



Debbie Allen; Carlene Boyd; Sheila By- 
rum; Gale Chamblee; Marie Chamblee; 
Sheilah Cotten; Brenda Dail; Ginny 
Deese; Lollie Edwards; Dora Fitzsim- 
mons; Ellen Garrison; Terry (ones; Maro- 
lyn (ordon; Laura Kilpatrick; Charlotte 
Layton; Susan Manning; Myra Modlin; 
Sharon Smith; Lu Ann Swain; Frances 
Swenholt; Velma Thomas; Terry Ward; 
Gail Betton. Scorer; Sue Calverley, Stat- 
istician; Lea Kemezis. Manager; Myra 
Lewis. Trainer; Miss Catherine Bolton, 
Coach 




Kim Aussanl; Judy Barnes; Denise Bob- 
bin; Sherry Cobb'; Debbie Davis; |erry 
Jones; Becky Keeter; Rodney McDonald; 
Rick Nipper; Mike Radford; |ohn Rambo; 
Kathy Rambo; Brvan Sibley 



Cheerleaders 



194 Organizations 





Gail Betlon; Catherine Bollon. Coach; 
Carlene Boyd; Dora Filzsimmons; Jane 
Gallop; Marion Hart; Terry Jones; Nancy 
Richards; Frances Swenholt; Lynn Schu- 
berl 



MINGES COLISEUM 

— p— — - — — ___________ 




Boh Bailey; Addison Bass; Ricky Bennett; 
]im Bolding; Larry Bolger; Clay Burnett; 
Ned Cheely; Toni Chipok; Pele Conaty; 
Rod Compton; ]immy Creech, Grad. Asst. 
Coach; Carlester Crumpler, Mike Crusie; 
Dave Dadisman; Tim Dameron, Grad. 
Asst. Coach; Bill D'Andrea, Grad. Asst. 
Coach; Tom Daub; Jonathan Deming; 
Jacob Dove; Stan Eure; Tom Frazier; 
Benny Gibson; John Grinnell; Cary God- 
ette; Greg Harbaugh; Bucky Harrison; 
Billy Hibbs; Tim Hightower; Robin 
Hogue; Fred Horeis; Jimmy Howe; Danny 
Kepley; Dan Killebrew; Warren Kla- 
vviter; Rickv Leonard; Buddv Lowery; 



Larry Lundy; Ernie Madison; RustyMark- 
land; Winston Mayhew; Ken Moore; 
Steve Mulder; Mike Myrick; G,ir\ Nik- 
lason; Frank Novack; Greg Pingston; Reg- 
gie Pinkney; Chip Post; Sonny Randle, 
Head Coach; Mike Roper; Skip Russell; 
Mike Shea: Don Schink; Tedd Schoch; 
Butch Strawderman; Ken Slrayhorn: Nel- 
son Strother; Carl Summerell; Joe Tkach; 
Henry Trevathan; Greg Troupe; Larry 
Van Der Heyden; Bobby Voight; Mike 
Weaver; Vic Wilfore; Wilber William- 
son; Jack White. Grad. Assl. Coach; Jim 
Woody 



Football 



Organizations 195 




Golf 



Les Bass; Bebo Balls, Carl Bell; Tommy 
Boone; Bill Cain. Head Coach; jack Cha- 
tham; Mac McLendon. Assl. Coach; Doug 
Owens; Eddie Pinnix; )im Ward 




Charlene Daniels; |ody Fountain, Coach; 
|oan Fulp; Linda Gosnell; |enny Griffin; 
Linda Lane; Debbie Laurer; Mimi Miller; 
Myrna Ocasio; Gail Phillips; Carol 
Reeves, Coach; Melanie Rufty; |ane 
Smith; Beth Wheeler; Tim Winslow. 
Coach; Vicki Witt 




196 Organizations 




Pete Angus; Chris Bain; Scolt Balas; Doug 
Burnett; Winston Chen; Mike Fetchko; 
Bob Gebhardl; )ohn Henderson; Rick 
|ohnson; Monte Little, Coach; Lloyd Mc- 
Cleeland; Bucky Moser; Danny O'Shea; 
David Schaler: Brad Smith; Tom Tozer; 
Ed Wolcott. Asst. Coach 



Soccer 








lam m% In I ) llJH 




Sue Bengham; Lu Boyd; D.|. Conlyn; Cryo 
Conner; Caroline Cooney; Molly Cros- 
land; ]o Greene; Cindy LaFollette; Mary 
McDuffie; Beverly Osborn; Eric Orders, 
Coach; |udy Peacock; Angela Pennino; 
Timmie Phaw; Marie Reichstein; Kalhy 
Schlee; Linda Shull; Linda Smiley; Bar- 
bara Strange; Kim Strickland; Peggy 
Toth; Donna Welch; Cindy Wheler; 
Tracie White; Mary Winters 



Ross Bohlken; Mike Bretting; Tom Falk; 
Larry Green; Jim Hadley; Charlie Hart: 
Greg Hinchman; Ronnie Hughes: Charlie 
Kemp; David Kirkman; Richard LaValee; 
Sieve Martin; Ken Morin; Henry Mor- 
row; Kevin O'Shea; Bill Brehn; Ricky 
Prince; Steve Rudelinger; Ray Sharf. 
Head Coach; Paul Schiffel; Ron Schnell; 
Bob St. Clair. Asst. Coach; Bohb\ Vail 



Organizations 197 




Men — Teddy Abegounis; Chris Davis; 
Doug Getsinger; Wray Gilelte; Tim Hill. 
Thomas Marion; Paul Martin; ]ames Pet- 
erson; John Rains; Jim Ratcliff; William 
Rambeau; Ed Spiegel; Bob Sullivan; 
Richard Thomas; |oe Zahran; Wes Hank- 
ins, Coach; Keith Winkler, Manager 
Women — Linda Anderson; Ann Archer; 
Cynthia Averett; Gail Betton; Susan Bus- 
sey; Ann Cnavase; Tisa Curtis; Ginny 
Deese; Janet Ennis; Ginny Gainey; Cheryl 
Harward; Leigh Jefferson; Bobbie Mor- 
rill; Susan Riddle; Lynn Schubert; Gwen 
Waller; Ellen Warren; Lynn Witt 



Tennis 



*jy 


wsaRfl 


-M 


^Sk a*mT jA%- 




j ~M 




. ' 


f , : 3. "' * : 


Ir* 


1- *^9K^^EdR?S^J^J^£ 


',., 


M. 


^fl^^^^P^ilykv'M^ \ 






^Sffctfe:^ 


I^Jb »Li'J^rf8jfetv/l^^V^K 


L ' jHK%«0 


r^ i 




B^3 </^«"^^HS>V^pT%U 




4 *wsf 



Bill Bailey; Neil Bransfield; Larry Clark; 
Al Cross; Carlester Grumpier; Curt 
Dowdy; |oe Durham, Nat Haggar; 
Willie Harvey; Larry (lines; |ohn Hoff- 
man, Manner Huntley; Ariah )ohnson; 
Al Kalamaja; ]erry Klas; Palmer Lisane; 
Charlie Lovelace; Larry Malone; Marty 
Martin; Bill McRee; Al McCrimmons; Art 
Miller; Scott Miller; Charles Moxay; Ivy 
Peacock; Sam Phillips; |ohn Pitts; Roy 
Quick; Ed Rigsby; Glen Russell; Dennis 
Stokes; Ken Stravhorn; Les Strayhorn; 
Robbie Walters; Tom Watson; Bill Wul- 
zvn 




198 Organizations 




Volleyball 



Sue Calverley; Gale Chamblee: Marie 
Chamblee; |an Glairborne; Susan Collie; 
Sheilah Colten; Cookie Eagan: F.m\ 
Fishel; Charlotte Layton: \'ickii' Lee: 
Myra Modlin: l.n Ann Swaim; Terry 
Ward; Donna Woolard: Bobbi Baker, 
Chaperone; Ginny Merrifield; Trainer; 
Sharon Smith. Scorer; Abdul Ah Ghori. 
Coach. 




Wrestling 



Glenn Baker; |im Blair; Willie Bryant; 
Bruce Hall; Bill Hill; Paul Ketchum; Tom 
Marriott: Mike Radford; Steve Satter- 
waite; Mill Sherman; |uhn Welborn. 
Coai h: RonWhitcomb 



Organizations 1M'( 




Campus Crusade 
for Christ 




Wesley Foundation 




Hebrew 
Youth 




Newman 
Club 



200 Organizations 



BUCCANEER 71 

FEATURES IT^ 




(30 E> 



[kaO 





W 



Since its inception in the minds of 
progressive leaders in eastern North 
Carolina, the ECU med-school has 
travelled a long and rocky road. The 
road was seemingly never rockier, 
however, than during the great debate 
raised over the expansion of the one- 
year program established at ECU by 
the NC General Assembly in 1972. 
Eventually decided by a compromise 
bill passed by the Joint Appropria- 
tions Committee of the General As- 
sembly, the debate raged between the 
UNC Board of Governors on the one 
hand and ECU forces on the other. 

Often placed in a bad light by pro- 
ponents of an expanded medical pro- 
gram at ECU, the University of North 
Carolina Board of Governors was not 
without a defense for its position. In 
a written statement to the Buccaneer, 




Board chairman William A. Dees, Jr. 

emphasized the accomplishments of 

the Board in the area of medical 

education: 

Recognizing North Carolina's 
great need for more doctors, the 
Board of Governors has given 
priority attention to medical 
education since it first assumed 
its responsibilities in the summer 
of 1972. The first result of this 
endeavor was a program for a 
major expansion of the School of 
Medicine of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
which will bring an increase in 
enrollment from 427 in 1972-73 
to 640 by 1979-80. Further, the 
Board proposed to increase the 
level of State assistance to the 
Bowman Gray School of Medi- 



gCd®®[ 



cine at Wake Forest University 
and to Duke University Medical 
School, with the understanding 
that these two institutions would 
increase their enrollment of 
North Carolinians. This expan- 
sion program, fully funded by 
the 1973 session of the General 
Assembly, is a great step forward 
in meeting the medical care 
needs of North Carolina. 
According to Dees. "Expanding the 
existing medical schools was the ac- 
tion needed to train more physicians 
in the shortest possible time.'' In Dees' 
words, however, the Board neverthe- 
less recognized that "more needed to 
be done." A special Panel of Medical 
Consultants composed of distin- 
guished medical educators was there- 
fore commissioned by the Board of 



Medical School 201 



Governors to investigate possibilities 
for the expansion of the one-year 
medical school at ECU. 

The report of this committee to the 
Board proved damaging to the ECU 
cause, and in it the Panel cited two 
reasons why expansion would be 
premature. First, a report issued by 
the Liaison Committee on Medical 
Education in April. 1973, had been 
highly critical of the one-year pro- 
gram at ECU. Second, the clinical 
resources necessary for undergrad- 
uate medical education were largely 
committed to the expansion program 
already instituted by the Board of 
Governors and funded by the General 
Assembly. 

Moreover, the Panel advised that 
the next important step in meeting 
North Carolina's need for more physi- 
cians was to expand post-graduate 
medical training rather than under- 
graduate. Toward this end the Panel 
suggested that a concentrated effort 
be made to expand the network of 
Area Health Education Centers. Dees 
outlined the main thrust of the Pane 
recommendation as follows: 

It called for the creation of 300 
new residency places in primary 
care specialties in North Caro- 
lina, and, most important of all, 




202 Methrul SrlrriCP 




it recommended that the network 
of Area Health Education Cen- 
ters be expanded, so that under- 
graduate and post-graduate med- 
ical education, and the clinical 
training of other health pro- 
fessions students, could utilize 
the resources of community 
hospitals across the State. In this 
way, more physicians could be 
immediately provided, a better 
geographical distribution of 
physicians through the rural 
areas of North Carolina could be 
achieved, clinical education re- 
sources could be expanded, and 
the facilities and resources for 
medical care in all regions of the 
State could be strengthened. 
The Board of Governors, on the 
basis of the Panels' report, developed 
a comprehensive plan for the expan- 
sion of medical education on a state- 
wide basis. The plan focused on the 
expansion of post-graduate medical 
education and Area Health Education 
Centers; expansion of ECU's one-year 
med school, however, was omitted. 
In a Fountainhead interview Dr. 
Wallace R. Wooles, dean of the pres- 
ent one-year School of Medicine at 
East Carolina, gave his reaction to the 
Panel's findings. Wooles disagreed 
with the committee's conclusion that 
a four-year med school at ECU would 
not necessarily mean more doctors 
for eastern North Carolina. He also 
felt that the estimated cost of such a 
school — $65 million — was mislead- 
ing. Dr. Edwin W. Monroe, vice chan- 
cellor of the ECU medical program, 
also indicated his disagreement with 
the Board's position in another inter- 
view for the campus newspaper. Mon- 
roe stated that it was possible for the 
decision to be amended by the NC 
General Assembly when it reviewed 
the Board of Governors recommenda- 
tions in 1974. 

Advocates of an expanded program 
for East Carolina were understand- 
ably dismayed by the Board's position, 
but were by no means quieted. In- 
stead, ECU forces voiced their argu- 



Opposite page. Top: Dr. McNeil 
directs students in anatomical loca- 
tions. Bottom: Students spend many 
hours in lab probing and identifying. 
Left: Brinkley Eure identifies cranial 
nerves in the brain. 



Medical School 203 



menls before the General Assembly's 
Joint Appropriations Committee. 

State Senator Ralph H. Scott sum- 
marized the months of strenuous de- 
bate in a statement for the Buccaneer: 
The turning point in East Caro- 
lina University's long struggle 
for expansion of its medical 
school occurred at a crucial 
meeting of the General Assem- 
bly's Joint Appropriations Com- 
mittee on February 25. 1974. 

For weeks and months the 
Committee leadership had 
sought to resolve the differences 
between the ECU forces on the 
one hand and the UNC Board of 
Governors forces on the other. 

Below: Pam Shirley and Sally Shu are 
ECU's two women medical students. 



When these efforts failed, Co- 
chairman Carl Stewart and 1 in- 
introduced a compromise bill. It 
called for adding a second year 
to the one-year med school, 
which is what the ECU forces 
wanted, but it did not specify a 
hard-and-fast deadline for doing 
so, which is what the Board of 
Governors was trying to avoid. 
Promoters of the compro- 
mise bill worked into the wee 
hours of the night on February 25 
trying to line up the necessary 
votes. When the Committee con- 
vened the following morning, it 
was apparent that the effort had 
succeeded. The Committee ap- 
proved the compromise bill by a 
comfortable margin of votes .... 
Inserted into the main body of the 



over-all State government budget bill, 
the compromise bill passed both 
House and Senate without debate. 
The limited victory ECU advocates 
enjoyed in February, 1974, was only 
one of many they had won over a 
period of ten years. The push for the 
medical school began in 1964 when the 
possibilities of beginning such a 
school at East Carolina were first ex- 
amined. Starting in 1965, the NC Gen- 
eral Assembly appropriated funds to 
ECU with the idea of establishing a 
four-year school in the future. The 
already-established School of Nursing 
gave an added incentive for instituting 
a medical school at the University. 
The more recent establishment of the 
School of Allied Health with its nine 
departments — social work; correc- 
continued on page 271 




204 Medical School 




JOYNER LIBRARY - 

gettiri better every day! 



Once a common target for criticism, 
Joyner Library made several recent 
improvements which helped meet the 
needs of the campus population. Dr. 
Ralph E. Russell, director of library 
services, stated in a Fountainhead 
article that "Our goal is to provide 
maximum access to library materi- 
als." Certainly the staff took signifi- 
cant steps in this direction during the 
1973-74 school year. 

The conversion from closed to open 
stacks during the summer ranked as 
the major improvement. Gone were 
the long lines of disgruntled students 
who paced the length of the circula- 
tion desk waiting for their books; 



instead, students browsed the shelves 
at their leisure, skimming the books 
they thought might be of value before 
investing time in filling out call slips. 
Russell admitted that the physical 
structure of the building was less than 
ideal for an open stack arrangement; 
after the system had been in operation 
for a trial period, however, he was 
pleased with everyone's cooperation 
and reported that the system was 
working very well. 

Another new feature of the library 
was the paperback exchange program, 
where students selected paperbacks 
from a special rack in the periodicals 
room in exchange for books they no 



longer needed. 

Attention focused as well on im- 
proving communication between the 
library users and its staff. Informative 
pamphlets acquainted incoming stu- 
dents with the many services [oyner 
had to offer. A question box by the 
library exit drew a number of queries 
regarding Joyner's operation, and 
replies were promptly posted for 
everyone's enlightenment. Expanded 
operating hours and an increase in the 
number of employees on the refer- 
ence staff allowed users to profit 
further from their library . 
Above: Massive columns rise up be- 
fore the entrance to Joyner. 



Joyne 




Above: Joyner's reference room re- 
mains active eighteen hours a day. 
Below left: Webster's unabridged pro- 
vides another answer. Below right: 
Joyner's serials catalog lists periodi- 
cals housed in the library. Opposite 



page. Top left: Open stacks allow stu- terials. Middle right: Cement blocks 

dents to select books at their conveni- are commonplace during construction 

ence. Bottom left: Xerox machines of Joyner's annex. Bottom right: Opin- 

save hours of copying. Top right: Loca- ion boxes invite responses from all 

tion maps aid students in finding ma- library users. 




206 Joyner 





[el us know u/hellier 
■ 01 ml wt would like 
dll bound nidgdjiws 
sfwlved in cm area of 
llw new (ibid/y aMlioi 




SijfflKW 



loyner 207 



r 



u 



It's Greek to Mel" 



^kl Forming generalizations 
^\ about the Greek culture as it 
was found on the ECU cam- 
pus in 1973-74 became as difficult a 
task as would have been the reading 
of a play by Sophocles in its original 
language by one untutored in the 
Greek alphabet. Such difficulties in 
generalizing had not always been the 
case. Once upon a time — and not a 
very long time ago it was — a Greek 
was a Greek was a Greek, and he 
stood out among independents as a 
leopard would have among a den of 
tigers. Alpaca sweaters, starched 
shirts, and drab khakis belted two 
inches above the navel formed the 
traditional male wardrobe, while the 
ensemble for coeds included light- 
fitting sweaters, strategically-posi- 
tioned Greek pins, and Pappagalo 
shoes. 

In its hey-day the Greek system was 
a world within a world, with brothers 
fraternizing almost exclusively with 
brothers, sisters with sisters. The only 
acceptable Friday night date lor the 
"fral rat"' was the "sorority chick." 
The result was the promulgation of the 
Greek culture, and the culture flour- 
ished. 
Something happened. 
Change came to East Carolina with 
recognizable sureness. The coals and 
ties once worn by men to every cam- 
pus social event — football and bas- 
ketball games, concerts, plays — were 
left hanging in the closet, replaced 
first with casual wear, then with care- 
less, 

The Greek culture experienced 
change as well; unlike the one of pro- 
Opposite puge; Variety is the spice of 
the Greek life. This page: The im- 
portance of the Greek system at ECU 
is evidenced by the fact thai SGA 
President Hill Bodenhamer and 
Homecoming Queen Nancy Morgan 
are Greeks. 




verbial reknown, the leopard changed 

its spots. A loss of identity ensued. 
When Greek styles shifted from the 
characteristic to the non-descript, the 
presence of the Greek culture' was no 
longer easily discerned. This loss of 
instant recognition, coupled with an 
"anti-establishment" sentiment (and 
the Greeks were definitely estab- 
lished), gave voice to the rumor that 
Greeks were' an endangered species, 
soon to be extinct. 

Time proved the rumor premature, 
however, if not altogether false. Cer- 
tainly, dramatic changes had trans- 
pired, with none more noticeable than 
the sharp decline in the number of 
students pledging during each suc- 
ceeding year. In spite of this decline, 
however, several national fraternities 
and sororities established local chap- 
ters at ECU, joining with those already 
established to offer a wider choice for 
students interested in pledging. This 
fact lent support to the claim that 
within the Greek system there was an 
ever-growing effort made toward de- 
veloping the individuality of (he 
Greek. Moreover, those pledging no 
longer did so merely to gain recog- 
nition and popularity; rather, they 
chose to "Go Greek" because they 
found the system genuinely appealing. 

During the 1973-74 year, Greeks 
continued to play a greater role, 
proportionate to their number, in the 
day-to-day campus activities than did 
independents. A roll call of the SGA 
Legislature would have revealed a 
large number of Greeks at work for 
their fellow students. Greek voices 
were heard at committee meetings 
and in honorary fraternities, and 
much of the exhuberant spirit dis- 
played at Pirate sporting events was 
attributable to the support Greeks 
gave to ECU athletic programs. The 
recall of the popular Homecoming 
parade, sorely missed during the dis- 
appointing '72 Homecoming, was 
sponsored by and made a reality 
through the efforts of the Inter-Fra- 
ternity Council. 

Opposite page. Top left: Costumes 
and Greeks go together. Center left: 
Connoisseurs of the femme physique 
delight in the Miss Venus contest. 
Bottom left: Bright smiles and fun 
typify Greek socials. Right: All-Sing 
participant Kim Ku/muk dons cos- 
tume and cosmetics for her part in the 
Chi Omega skit. This page: Pi Lambda 
Phi's talents prove a winner at Alpha 
Xi's All-Sing. 



Nor were Greeks limited in their 
activities to campus alone. Individual 
sororities throughout the Near con- 
tributed their services to fund-raising 
drives by various national health 
associations. Likewise. individual 
fraternities sponsored fund-raising 
campaigns for needy families, the 
Crippled Children's Association, and 
similar charities. Pitt County's Blood 
Bank profiled by a blood drive pro- 
moted by the IPC. Far from being ex- 
tinct, the Greek system was alive and 
well at East Carolina. 

Greeks portrayed an image of them- 
selves during the year that was at 
once more universal, yet more indi- 
vidual and personal, than ever before 
— quite a different image from that 
projected by Greeks at the turn of the 
decade. Having reached the exagger- 
ation point — Greeks dating Greeks. 
dressing Greek, and disassociating 
themselves from anything that lacked 
Greek approval -- the proverbial 
pendulum swung back. 



Observers could no longer point out 
a sorority girl or fraternity man by 
any immediately recognizable trait — 
Pappagelo shoes, alligator belts, or 
blue Gant shirts. Greeks were rarely 
seen as different from other students 
because they were not different. The 
Greek did not wear his jersej for rec- 
ognition as much as he wore it for 
reasons of personal pride, even as 
members of other campus organiza- 
tions wore their insignia. 

Once, the infamous "sorority chick" 
and "frat rat" attended school year- 
round and still needed five years to 
complete the' curriculum. In recent 
years, however, scholarship claimed 
more attention from these "profes- 
sional students", and fewer Greeks 
found it necessarj to raise QPs in the 
eleventh hour in order to graduate. 
ECU's eight sororities, for example, 
posted a combined grade point aver- 
age of 2.6 in H)7:i-74 — an average 
higher than thai held by (he typical 
ECU student. 




Greeks — an Afterthought 

(An open letter by Brownie WiJson) 

7'oo often in life the moral beliefs 
and worthy objectives of a group be- 
come clouded in the quest for more 
easily accessible, tangible goals. The 
short-lived enjoyment of winning a 
contest or being the largest in num- 
bers, however, soon fades away into 
u dim memory of the past. The true 
value of belonging to a fraternal or- 
ganization lies not in material growth 
and social position but in the knowl- 
edge of people and a new compassion 
for their welfare. 

Love and fellowship establish the 
basis for growth und wisdom in the 
Greek system. Frequently, people 
have ignored this foundation and 
have struggled through their college 
years with a misconception of its pur- 
pose. How sad it is that such a valu- 



able opportunity has been misused. 

One of the great lessons in life is 
respect for others — for their convic- 
tions, positions, hopes, and dreams. 
One should always strive to under- 
stand and appreciate those with whom 
he comes in contact. Respect for an- 
other person is a great gift and in turn 
earns respect for the giver. The Greek 
system teaches that love and respect 
are the two most important objectives 
a person can hope to achieve in life. 

Perseverance and self-knowledge, 
also teachings of the Greek system, 
are the prerequisites to a better un- 
derstanding of the world and its gifts. 
The greatest asset to the Greek system 
is a person's giving of himself to help 
others. The satisfaction derived is 
equal to the labor expended. 

Each day brings with it a new chal- 
lenge and a responsibility to live life 
fully. Without knowledge of the true 



teachings of life a person is handi- 
capped in his attempt to meet this 
challenge. To reach out and help a 
person become a more complete 
being is the obligation of the Greek; 
to grow within as this special relation- 
ship develops and prospers is his 
reward. Each one reached in this man- 
ner in turn helps others find a more 
lasting peace. Fellowship grows by 
personal contact. 

Love, fellowship, compassion, 
respect, and humility are the real 
teachings of the Greek system. Growth 
is attained only by following the les- 
sons and by making a real effort to 
govern life by them. The final result 
of the Greek system is not a refined 
socialite, but a deeper, more caring 
individual. Those who learn this great 
lesson are on the path to a fuller, 
richer life. 





r 



<p*Vv 






Em 




Cwrtam ®UpS 



For the East Carolina Playhouse, 
the 1973-74 season proved to he one of 
the most successful in its history. Five 
major productions - - The Merry 
Wives of Windsor, Huir, Indians, 
Mass, and Dracula — a new studio 
theatre, and the renovation of Mc- 
Ginnis Auditorium made tht: year a 
memorable one. 

Shakespeare's bawdy comedy The 
Merry Wives of Windsor was not only 
the season opener for the Playhouse 
but also the first major production 
performed in the much-anticipated 
studio theatre. Albert Pertalion, Play- 
house General Manager, saw the 
studio as a major asset to the drama 
department. According to Pertalion, 
the smaller theatre, seating between 
100 and 300 people, provided the de- 
partment with a much-needed area 
in which to train students interested 
in careers in films and television — 
the delivery of an actor in the studio 
theatre closely approximated that 
needed for film and television work. 
Pertalion predicted (hat the studio 
would be an important drawing point 
for students interested in drama. 

Equally important wen.' the inti- 
mate atmosphere and virtually un- 
limited staging possibilities the studio 
provided. For the production of Merry 
Wives, for example, the stage ex- 
tended into the seating area so that 
during performances the audience 
bordered the stage on three sides; 
the close proximity between actor and 
audience generated a feeling of inti- 
macy which breathed life into the 
lusty spirit of Shakespeare's comedy. 

The Elizabethan set for Merry 
Wives, however, while; remarkable in 
its quaint, antique flavor, was. never- 
theless, rather simple when compared 
with the elaborate staging employed 
in the production of Arthur Kopit's 
indians. An oval-shaped stage' encir- 
cled the seating area and converted 
the studio into a theatre-in-the-round. 
The increased staging area allowed 
scene designer Robert Williams to 
have a number of sets assembled on 
stage at the same time so that there 
was virtually no lapse in action be- 
tween scenes during actual per- 
formances. 



As with Merry Wives, the intimacy 
between the players and their audi- 
ence strengthened the impact of the 
drama. Don Biehn directed the play, 
which is both a brilliant example of 
contemporary black humor and a 
social commentary of the American 
pre-occupation with violence'. 

As controversial as Indians was, 
however, the production of the smash 
Broadway musical Hair drew con- 
siderably more attention. The interest 
centered, of course, on the play's nude 
scene. Although the cast of Hair was 
strongly in favor of doing the scene, 
a feeling among the production staff 
and the University administration that 
nudity might jeopordize the play's 
reception was cause for its ommission. 
Hair dealt with far more than just 
nudity, however, and the deletion was 
hardly noticeable. A product of the 
times, Hair exerted tremendous in- 
fluence not only upon drama itself 
but upon many aspects of American 
culture as well. 

Another unusual problem accom- 
panying the production of Hair con- 
cerned the availability of the show's 
musical score. East Carolina was one 
of the first universities to stage the 
play, and the Playhouse requested 
the show so soon after its release for 
non-professional production that the 
rental agency for the musical had not 
had time to have the scores printed. 
Originally scheduled for October, the 
production was postponed until 
December. 

Director Edgar Loessin and choreo- 
grapher Mavis Ray shared responsi- 
bility in producing Hair, while Barry 
Shank conducted the orchestra. Since 
Huir was performed in McGinnis 
Auditorium rather than the studio 
theatre, a rapport between the actors 
and audience was more difficult to 
establish; efforts were nonetheless 
made in this direction as cast mem- 
bers mingled with the audience prior 
to curtain call and frequently left 
flowers as mementos of their visit, 
During the finale, everyone was en- 
couraged to join the cast on stage for 
a gala singing of "Let the Sun Shine. " 
The second Playhouse musical, the 
fourth production of the season, as- 




sumed a more reserved atmosphere. 
The four-day run at East Carolina of 
Leonard Bernstein's Mass was only 
the sixth production of the show of 
any kind, professional or non-pro- 
fessional. Those attending the play, 
in addition to enjoying a musical 
unique in its range of musical genres, 
also had an opportunity to view and 
hear two visiting performers: Ron 
Lake, one of the most famous boy 
sopranos in the nation, flew in from 
Los Angeles to take part in the pro- 
duction; and John Russell, an heroic 
tenor from Philadelphia, sang the lead 
role of the Celebrant. 

Loessin and Ray once again han- 
dled the directing and choreographing 
duties. Robert Hause conducted, and 
Charles More was the associate musi- 
cal director. 

The season ended on a macabre 
note with the production of a classic 
melodrama: Dracula! Based on Bram 
Stoker's eerie account of the infamous 
Transylvanian count, Dracuia enjoyed 
enthusiastic reception by students. 
With the season already crowded with 
remarkable successes, the Playhouse 
added one more by presenting a spe- 
cial midnight performance of the 
Gothic drama; the late hour had little 
effect upon the size of the audience, 
though, as McGinnis hosted a capacity 
crowd. 

Since 1964, the Playhouse had spon- 
sored a Summer Theatre, but the 
many students and Greenville citi- 
zens who looked forward to the musi- 
cals were disappointed this year. In- 
stead of the sound of music, the 
sound of hammers and saws rever- 
berated through McGinnis as the Aud- 
itorium underwent long-awaited reno- 
vation. In addition to the needed re- 
modeling, however, a lack of new 
Broadway musicals left the Playhouse 
with too-limited a number of plays 
from which to select and further con- 
tributed to the decision to forego the 
Summer Theatre for the 1974 season. 

Comfortably seated in his theatre 

seat, a member of the audience had 

little to do but relax and enjoy the 

continued on page 272 

Top left; Indians stars Gregory Smith 
as Buffalo Bill Cody. Left; Bram Stok- 
er's classic tale of the living dead 
comes to ECU (photo by Guy Cox). 
Right, top and bottom: Bernstein's 
Mass presents a unique range of song 
and dance (photos by Guy Cox). 




: I'M 




Above left: Playhouse costumes dis- with a comely wench. Below: Falstaff Colorful posters announce the arrival 
play intricate detail. Above right: is the center of attention in The Merry of the most controversial play of the 
Falstaff enjoys a flirtatious moment Wives of Windsor. Opposite page, decade — Hair.' 







. -/."■ 


w 






;11|| 


ml 


I 




* 


1 ^^ -■ 




-J 



218 Playhouse 



A 




^ <- 


ROW SEAT 


GOOD ONLY ^k ^ 

THU. 8:15 P.M. M £ 
MAY %J •- 


McBINNIS AUDITORIUM 


RESERVED SEAT $2.00 


""'SXZoSZV, co - e?gg&~ <s>aea 




. 


o 


< •* 


s 


ss 


Jim,. 


Z •* 


- 5 « 

SB c 


oJ 


o 


^S) 1 ^ 


eeij 


in 


cvi 


Od<2 ■=£ 




CO 


<a 




£3 sz 


Lj_I 


3£ 


°>-£ **3* 


■a i_ 
<t o 


l—i—l 


O 
CO 


h3^S 


Z 


=2 


ai 






*" 


C3 


111 s. 


McGINN 

Greenvi 


MAY 

9 

1974 
NO REFUND 


J.V3S MOM 


1 f~ H 


/ m \/ 


r . ~n \i 


U — i V 


frZ.6 1 '6 AVIAI 


W d SI =8 3A3 nH± 

002$ 





Opposite page. Top left: Bill Devins 
works the light board during Mass. 
Top right: Constructing sets for In- 
dians is one of the responsibilities 
shared by Janet Tremon and her fel- 
low drama students. Bottom left; 
Chester Hardison repairs a sofa for 



the opening of Dracula. Bottom right: 
Grabbing a quick bite between cos- 
tumes. Carol Beule watches assistant 
Susan Lambeth at work. This page. 
Above: Carol Beule adjusts Judy 
Townsend's hair for her role in 
Dracula. 



Playhouse 219 




Above left: Transylvania's legendary frontation between Dracula and Van page: Colorful bonnets symbolize the 

Count and his sultry mistress embark Helsing. Below: John Russell kneels warrior heritage of the American 

on another night of feasting. Above in the shadows as ceremonial rites Indian exploited in Buffalo Bill's Wild 

right: Tension mounts during the con- are performed in Mass. Opposite West Show (photo by Guy Cox). 




"Probably the most misunderstood 
student organization on campus" — this 
was how Gibert Kennedy. 1973-74 Stu- 
dent Union President, described his 
organization in a special Fountainhead 
article. Regrettably, many students 
remained unaware of the tremendous 
impact the Union had upon day-to-day 
life at East Carolina, despite the 
frequent efforts made by Kennedy 
throughout the year to inform the 
student body of the Union's activities. 
In Ihe newspaper article, Kennedy 
outlined the major responsibilities of 
the organization: 

The Student Union is the pri- 
mary souce of student program- 
ming, and as such it is our re- 
sponsibility to provide such a 
wide variety of entertainment 
that no segments of the student 
body feel overlooked. Thus, we 
sponsor a number of different 
types of social, recreational, and 
cultural events ranging from pop 
concerts to professional theatre 
productions to bingo parties. In 
addition, we continually strive to 
be sensitive to changes in student 
programming demands and to he 
flexible enough to respond to 
these trends. Thirdly, we are 
always seeking to upgrade our 
existing programs. We serve the 
role of a trustee over a vast 
amount of student money and we 
would be shirking our responsi- 
bility if we did not see to it that 
the students are getting the best 
returns possible on their money. 
The Union had only recently as- 
sumed these responsibilities. Prior to 
the spring of 1972. major programs 



were scheduled by committees work- 
ing under Ihe auspices of the SGA. 
Campus politics, however, often in- 
terrupted efforts to establish a con- 
sistent and responsive programming 
policy. Recognizing this weakness, 
SGA legislators, encouraged by a 
vigorous Union lobby, transferred the 
programming responsibilities to the 
Union, an organization which by its 
inherent nature was more suited to 
the task. 

Accompanying this move was a re- 
structuring of the Student Union itself. 
In previous years the Union had been 
a rather loosely-knit organization of 
interested students ("walk-ons," as 
Union ciritcs described them|; in fact, 
it was just this lack of selectivity with 
regard toward choosing its members 
that had prevented the Union from 
taking over the reins of student pro- 
gramming years earlier. 

The present system authorizes a 
Hoard of Directors to select Ihe Stu- 
dent Union President. The Board is 
composed of the SGA President. 
Treasurer, and Speaker of the Legisla- 
ture: the Presidents of the MRC, WRC, 
Panhellnic Council, and IPC; a rep- 
resentative from the P'aculty Senate 
Committee: a representative from the 
Administration: Associate Dean of 
Student Affairs Rudolph Alexander: 
and the retiring Student Union Presi- 
dent. The revised system more nearly 
insures that qualified individuals who 
have demonstrated their interest and 
ability are entrusted with the demand- 
ing responsibilities of the Union Presi- 
dency. Thus far. the Board has selected 
new Presidents from students who 
have previously worked within the 
continued on page 226 



Williams opens 
at Coffeehouse 

busting, out In a song- . .12^ >fcsUY, totally ou 






Opposite page. Left: In concert with 
the Temptations are the Quiet Elog- 
ance. Top right: The lyrics of "My 
Girl" call for a personal approach. 
Below right; Under burning spotlights, 
the Temptations assert the world is 



just a "Ball of Confusion." This page. 
Above: Within the dark void, a capa- 
city crowd listens spellbound to the 
legendary Temptations. Below left: 
John Hammond eases the tempo with 
his folk music (photo by Rick Gold- 



man). Below right: The rock sound of 
the Wet Willie Band headlines the 
Sunday Homecoming concert (photo 
by Rick Goldman). 






continued from page 223 
organization and have (herein gained 
valuable experience. Wade Hobgood, 
for example, President-elect lor 1974- 
75. chaired the Special Concerts Com- 
mittee during Kennedy's administra- 
tion. Once chosen, the President-elect 
appoints new committee chairmen 
who in turn recruit members for each 
committee. Within the committees 
was a representative cross-sampling 
of the campus population. 

For the eight Union committees, the 
1973-74 season was crowded with a 
variety of events, with occasional 
disappointments offset by several 
outstanding programs. 

Receiving the majority of student 
attention during (he year was the 
Popular Entertainment Committee. In 
a Buccaneer interview, Kennedy and 
Hobgood discussed (he major prob- 
lems involved in booking "pop" en- 
tertainment. The primary difficulty 
was in scheduling artists (hal were at 
once both appealing to a majority of 
the students and within the financial 
capabilities of the Union. These two 
considerations alone were more than 
enough to make (he Committee's task 
difficult. The diverse range of musical 



tastes held by ECU students meant 
that scheduling an act with universal 
appeal was nigh impossible. More- 
oxer, performers enjoying the success 
of stardom often demanded upwards 
of $25,000; since seating facilities at 
Minges are severely limited, the only 
way such an amount could have been 
raised would have been by drastically 
increasing the cost of student tickets, 
and experience has shown that stu- 
dents are generally reluctant to pay 
such high prices. 

Other problems were encountered 
as well. Greenville is removed from 
what performers viewed as a more 
profitable route — Raleigh. Greens- 
boro, Charlotte, and Atlanta. Poor 
transportation by car and plane 
further contributed to the problem. 
Kennedy remarked that these diffi- 
culties were compounded when the 
Union attempted to schedule concerts 
for specific dates, as in the case of 
Homecoming weekend; in the future, 
he explained, students may well ex- 
pect to see concerts scheduled on odd 
dates — including weeknights, as hap- 
pened with the Commander Cody/ 
New Riders concert. 





Date: October 4, 1973 Time: 8:15 p.m. 

Place: Wright Auditorium at East Carolina University 
Admission: Reserved Section Seating 

Students $2, Faculty and Staff $3, Public $5 

Tickets May Be Purchased In The Central Ticket Office, 

P. O. Box 2731, Greenville, N. C. Telephone 758-6278 

PRESENTED BY THE STUDENT UNION THEATRE ARTS COMMITTEE 



Hobgood further noted that fre- 
quently popular recording artists were 
not successful in concert. Again wit- 
nessing the Commader Cody/ New 
Riders concert, the New Riders have 
enjoyed popularity for several years, 
yet ECU students found their per- 
formance in Minges stair. Finally. 
even when the Union was able to book 
a popular act. circumstances beyond 
its control occasionally prevented the 
show from becoming a reality, as ex- 
emplified by the cancellation of the 
Doobie Brothers concert in fall, 

The Committee's efforts this vear 



fell short of the students' expectations 
and raised much criticism. Most con- 
troversial was the scheduling of the 
Hanneford Circus in late March— the 
event, like several events before it, 
lost money. Despite the criticism, 
however, the Committee did bonk a 
variety of acts in an effort to provide 
something for every taste. The best- 
received and most profitable show of 
the year was the Temptations concert 
on Friday night of Homecoming week- 
end. Sunday's Homecoming concert 
featured three acts — the Wet Willie 
Band, |ohn Hammond, and Lynard 



Skynard— but netted little student 
interest. 

The success realized by the Special 
Concerts Committee last year with the 
Karl Scruggs Revue prompted the 
Popular Entertainment Committee to 
schedule his return this year. The 
pro fit gained by the bluegrass concert, 
however, was offset by the losses by 
incurred by a later concert scheduled 
on a weeknight and featuring Com- 
mander Cody and His Lost Planet Air- 
men and the \'ow Riders of the Purple 
Sage. 

Hobgood saw the unwillingness of 
the Committee to take the "big risk" 
in scheduling a popular, but expensive 
act as the primary reason for the fi- 
nancial losse's. Hobgood widely pub- 
lized plans to redirect the Committee's 
thinking; the 1974-75 Committee, re- 
continued on page 230 

Opposite page. Top: Christine [orgen- 

son discusses the harmful effects of 
the sexual conformity society imposes. 
Bottom: Pantomimist Marcel Marceau 
poses as Bip the Clown. This page, 
/.eft: Posters announce the perform- 
ance at ECU of the smash Broadway 
musical GodspeU. Below: Imogene 
Coca and King Donovan star in Neil 
Simon's The Prisoner of Second Ave- 





Pi 


\ 




WAiSt 


^^^^^T 1 




R^i-^4 d 




m m ffi 






L^ 'J 


F 3 


Ij3| I 




H ^' ■ 




m 






w% 


< 

- • 




Above: Mark Chappell appears as 
"Mark Twain on Stage." Right: The 
Cynthia A. Mendenhall Student Cen- 
ter nears its completion. Opposite 
page: East Carolina is one of many 
colleges visited by the Hanneford 
Circus. 

continued from page 227 

named Major Attractions, will aim for 
big names in entertainment. 

While the Popular Entertainment 
Committee met with disappointment, 
other committees experienced a tre- 
mendous year. 

Spurred into being by the success 
of the ECU production of SJueth by 
a professional touring company, the 
Theatre Arts Committee was formed in 
the spring of 1973. In its first year it 
scheduled four plays, all popularly 
received— Godspell, a contemporary 
musical based on the gospel according 
to St. Matthew; The Prisoner of Sec- 
ond Avenue, a mad-cap comedy by 
Neil Simon starring the husband-and- 
wife team of King Donovan and Imo- 
gene Coca; the delightful impersona- 
tion by John Chappell of America's 
famed humorist in Mark Twain on 
Stage; and the outstanding musical 
RSVP: the Cole Porters, a story baser 
on the' life of the celebrated composeT 



2.3(1 Slueienl Union 



lyricist. 

The Lecture Committee presented 
several notable speakers during the 
year, including Love Story-author 
Erich Segal. Segal, the second author 
to address ECU students, spoke on the 
future of literature. Earlier in the year 
James Dickey, author of Deliverance, 
discussed his first interest, poetry. 
Kaarlo Tuomi described his experi- 
ences as a double secret agent work- 
ing for the USSR and the United 
States. Reporter John McCook Roots 
outlined the new role China has taken 
as a major world power. Highlighting 
the series, however, was Christine 
Jorgenson, who spoke to a capacity 
audience on her sexual transforma- 
tion which stunned the world in the 
early fifties. 

Although the speaker series was 
well-known, fewer students were 
aware that the Lecture Committee also 
scheduled the Travel-Adventure 
series. This year the series again in- 
cluded filmed travels which literally 
spanned the globe, from a cinematic 
journey of Mark Twain's visit to the 
Swiss Alps to a feature on discovering 
New Zealand to a documentary on 
famous pioneer trails of the American 
West. 

Headlining the Artists Series, world- 
renowned pantominist Marcel Mar- 
ceau thrilled a captive ECU audience 
in Wright. From around the globe the 
Artists Series Committee selected its 
acts— the Philippine Bayanihan Dance 
Troupe, French pianist Philippe En- 
tremont, the Vienna Johann Strauss 
Orchestra, the Warsaw Philharmonic 
Orchestra, and the Paul Hill Chorale. 
Unlike the Popular Entertainment 
and Special Concerts committees, 
which book acts within months of the 
performance dates, committees such 
as Theatre Arts and Artists Series 
book a year in advance. 

Acts for the 1973-74 Artists Series, 
for example, were chosen by the pre- 
vious year's committee; the 1973-74 
Artists Series Committee, meanwhile, 
made the necessary arrangements for 
each performance this year and as- 
sumed the responsibility for schedul- 
ing acts for the 1974-75 season. 

In only its second year of operation, 
the Special Concerts Committee book- 
ed acts that appealed to current fads 
in music. Capitalizing on the enthus- 
I iasm generated by the blue grass beat, 
the Committee scheduled no less than 



four concerts featuring country artists. 
Matthew and Peter opened the series 
in September with their folk sound, 
and Kennedy firmly believed that the 
two were destined for stardom in 
\ ears to come. A folk festival in March 
featured Raun McKinnon, a young 
lady who had enchanted ECU stu- 
dents a year earlier when she per- 
formed at the Canticle; appearing with 
Ms. McKinnon were the Dawson Boys. 
Billed as "the greatest electric blue 
grass band in the world." the Mission 
Mountain Wood Band played to a 
spirited audience during their April 
concert on the mall. Equally success- 
ful was the Blue Grass Festival featur- 
ing the Country Gentlemen, the Blue 
Grass Experience, the Green Grass 
Cloggers, and local favorites the Flat- 
hind Family Band. From mid-after- 
noon until late evening the mall was 
crowded with hand-clapping, knee- 
slapping students enjoying the music, 
the company, and the warm spring 
weather. 

While blue grass groups predomi- 
nated the series, rock also received 
attention. The groups Painter. Chick 
Corea and the Return to Forever, and 








Southsound rounded out the Com- 
mittee's programming. 

Equally important were the pro- 
grams sponsored by the Films. Coffee- 
house, and Recreations committees. 

Occasional items in Fountainhead's 
campus events section announcing 
"Casino Day" or "Games Night" indi- 
cated that the Recreations Committee 
wasat work. Inaddition to these rather 
novel programs, the Committee spon- 
sored more traditional events — tourna- 
ments, watermelon feasts, ant 
cream bingo parties. Also offered were 
lessons on bowling and bridge. In 
anticipating the 1974-75 year, however, 
President-elect Hobgood commented 
that, unless greater interest was 
shown, the Recreations Committee 
might not be organized; at the time of 
the Buccaneer interview, no chairman 
had been appointed for the Committee. 

"Free flicks" fell under the auspices 
of the Films Committee. In recent 
years the Committee made a move to- 
ward featuring current films for its 
Friday night audience. Frenzy, Let It 
Be, Klute. and One Day in the Life of 
Ivan Denisovich were only a few of 
continued on page 272 




Vj 





k$% 



Opposite page: Bearing the scars of page. Above: Still Lums to old timers, line the bar at the Buc. Below right- 
constant use. the entrance to the Elbo the Crows Nest remains a popular Soft lights create atmosphere at the 
Room lures students out for a good spot with the college crowd (photo by Buc. 
time (photo by Rick Goldman). This Rick Goldman). Below left: Students 





Above left: Downtown is "where it's G-ville's night people. Below: When C 
at" for mosl students. Above right: the city fire marshal ordered the night tb 
Hnndstiimping is a badge of honor for clubs closed, students gathered along C 



BUCCANEER 



Train to Georgia" * Pre 
drink!" * Black lights 
hall * "Photograph' 
Nothing else to do!" 
mond Girl" * "I j 
Paper cups * "If 
"Mockingbird" j 
Falstaff * "Bop 
Michaloh * V) 
Blue Grass * \ 
Life" * Spin 
Brown" * T : ^ 




i Hi "Benny and the Jets" * Pinhall * John Denver * "1 go- 

iss Moon * Pabst * College I. I), required * "Midnight 

::als and Crofts * Clogging * "It's someplace to dance and 

it/ * "Smoke on the Water" * Allmand Brothers * Foots- 

SO ROOM * "Sunshine on My Shoulder" * "There's 
ckey * Miller * Beatjes * Band of Ox * Boogie * "Dia- 
ip!" CROWS NEST * Cover charge for lost tickets * 
In (You Gofta Raise a Little Hell}" * Carly Simon * 
l^erything and nothing!" * DARRYL'S * Pegasus * 
>s Taylor * Cigarettes and smoke * Southsound * 
J"his Way Again" * Frosty mugs * Sha-Na-Na * 
L4 R * Hydra * "You Are the Sunshine of My 
k^"* Rock * PAPA DOC'S * "Bad Leroy 
^febe lights * Tarns * Soul * Atmosphere 
^BUCCANEER * August Tide * Bud- 



Seals ar 
Schlitzl 
* ELBCm 
hockejj 
up!" C 1 
(You ( 




aper v 
' febird 



This Way 1 

EAR * Hydra *- 

sion!" * Rock * PATT^fOU 

* Strobe lights * Tarns * s) 

man!" * BUCCANEER * A 



"Midnight Train to Ceorgi 
to dance and drink!" * Bl. 
brothers * Footsball * "Plj 
der" J "There's Nothing el' 
Boogie * "Diamond Girl" 1 
lost tickets * Paper cups * 1 
Simon * "Mockingbird" *] 
Pegasus * Falstaff * "Band 



* Sha-Na-Na * Blue Grass | 
Sunshine of My Life" * Sp 

* "Bad Leroy Brown" * [im 
Atmosphere * Eric Claptor 
Tide * Budweiser * "Bennv 



Train to Georgia" * Pret;| 
drink!" * Black lights* 1 
ball * "Photograph" * I 
Nothing else to do!" * Pi 




; to re 
Just Yo 
's when 
all * Johri 

in ii ril ' 



'Benny and ll 



Is and Crofts * C 
/ * "Smoke on th 
30 ROOM * "Si 
»ckey * Miller * ' 



"o Georgia" * Pretzels * ATTIC * 
' '" * Black lights * Heartwood * 
s'Phofography" * Armageddon 
^> to do!" * Potato chips * Air 
"I go to see who 1 can pick 
You Wanna Get to Heaven 
fgbird" * "It's a place to celebrate every- 
'{Bund on the Run" * Schooners * James 
\UNlON JACK * "We May Never Pass 
AFlatland Family Band * RATHSKEL- 
^°rs * "It's a place to relieve the ten- 
ice * Juke box * "Just You and Me" 
L Happy Hour * "It's where it's at, 
&nd the Jets" * Pinhall * John Den- 
abst * College I. D. required * 
ts * Clogging * "It's someplace 
dke on the Water" * Allmand 
M * "Sunshine on My Shoui- 
tiller * Beatles * Band of Ox * 
|S /VEST * Cover charge for 
laise a Little Hell}" * Carly 
1 nothing!" * DARRYL'S * 
^* Cigarettes and smoke * 
'ay Again" * Frosty mugs 
l* Hydra * "You Are the 
^ * Rock * PAPA DOC'S 
3 lights * Tarns * Soul * 
UCCANEER * August 



Pret/els 








Above left: Anxiety shows in the face 
of this Pirate cheerleader as the Bucs 
mount a desperate drive in the final 
moments of the East Carolina/Caro- 
lina gridiron clash. Left: Carlester 
Grumpier cracks through blue-jersey- 
ed linemen on his way to another ECU 
first down. Above lop: With flanker 
Mike Shea running interference, Carl 
Summerell streaks to the outside dur- 
ing the championship game with the 
Spiders of Richmond. Above center: 
KCI l's "Little Horn." Kenny Strayhorn, 
eludes tacklers as the Pirates roll to a 
44-14 devastation of Richmond and to 
their second straight Southern Con- 
ference crown. Opposite page. Bot- 
tom: Wilder than ever, the fearsome 
"Wild Dog" defense of Danny Kepley 
and company smother the Tarheels' 
ground game. 



23fi Sports 



excitement: /ik-'sit-mant/ n 1: the act 
of exciting: the state of being excited 
2: something that excites or rouses: 
East Carolina sports 

If Webster were alive today and 
still compiling his dictionary, he 
might well term "excitement" and 
East Carolina athletics synonymous. 
Certainly sports enthusiasts familiar 
with the Pirates' unique brand of 
action would. From the opening kick- 
off at Carter Stadium to the final out 
at Harrington Field, the 1973-74 season 
made "Purple Pride" more than just 
an alliterative slogan. 

During the year Pirate fans saw 
stunning victories and heartbreaking 
defeats. watched long-standing 
records being smashed, and heard 
controversies over the status of crew 
and lacrosse, the Tangerine Bowl, and 
the firing of head basketball coach 
Tom Quinn. The short but illustrious 
era of head football coach Sonny 
Randle also came to an end; and new 
coach Pat Dye, fresh from the staff of 
Bear Bryant, brought with him a bit of 
'Bama fever.' Championship foot- 
ball, wrestling, swimming, and base- 
ball teams brought Southern Confer- 
ence crowns to Greenville, and the 
Purple and Gold collectively com- 
peted for the most coveted conference 
trophy of all — the Commissioner's 
Cup! " 

FOOTBALL 

For the Pirate football squad it was 
another fine year, one in which the 
Purple and Gold equalled the 9-2 rec- 
ord of the previous season and again 
claimed the conference crown as its 
own. For the second straight year the 
Pirates were undefeated at home 
(their last defeat at Ficklen Stadium 
being a 14-7 loss to Richmond during 
the 1971 season). On the road the Bucs 
won four of six. 

NC State's Carter Stadium was the 
first port o' call for the Pirates; when 
the rout was over, it seemed East Car- 
olina was doomed to a long season. 

"Put the blame on me for not 
getting them ready. " 

Sonny Randle 

Fumbles, interceptions, broken plays, 
and a porous defense were grim evi- 
dence that six weeks of grueling prac- 
tice in dry-dock had failed to scrape 



the barnacles from the Pirate ship. 
Scoreboard lights boasted "The Pack 
Is Back," and 40,500 — the largest 
crowd in the stadium's history — saw 
more than enough to convince them of 
its truth. The Liberty Bowl-bound 
Wolfpack scored almost at will, mak- 
ing ECU's vaunted "Wild Dogs" more 
nearly resemble toy poodles. State 
shattered its school record for total 
yardage by ripping off 585 yards en 
route to a 57-8 romp. If Pirate fans 
were purple this evening, it was with 
embarassment rather than pride. 

"After the loss to State, every- 
one was scared. We knew what 
might happen if we iost to 
Southern Mississippi the next 
week, so we went out and won." 
Carl Summerell 

Southern Mississippi's Golden 
Eagles had made the Pirates walk the 
gangplank in all four of their previous 
meetings; in light of East Carolina's 
opening disaster, a strong Eagle run- 
ning game, and the advantage of play- 
ing on home field, the Mississippians 
were again odds-on favorites. Four 
quarters of play proved pre-game 
speculation wrong, however, as the 
Pirates plucked the Eagles' feathers 
and carried home a 13-0 victory. The 
game marked several firsts: the first 
of three shut-outs for the Wild Dogs, 
the first game in which sophomore 
Kenny Strayhorn started, and the first 
of six straight Pirate wins. 

"Here's the snap, the spot, the 
kick, it's up, it's . . . good!" 

Dick Jones 

Few fans were able to travel to 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi, to see the 
game, so they listened instead to "The 
Voice of the Pirates," Dick Jones. To 
hear Jones once was to remember 
him for life. An enthusiastic, dyed-in- 
the-wool Pirate fanatic, Jones was to a 
large degree responsible for popular- 
izing the nickname "Wild Dogs" and 
the tags "Big Horn" and "Little Horn" 
for running back Les Strayhorn and 
his younger brother Kenny. During the 
Southern Mississippi game, Jones 
treated radio listeners to another 
nickname — the "Triple-S Offense" 
of Carl Summerell, Kenny Strayhorn, 
and Don Schink. 

The trio managed only one touch- 



down but helped set up two field goals 

by Jim Woody for a lucky thirteen 

points. 

Bucs Down Southern Illinois, Furman 

East Carolina was still on the road 
for its third game of the season, facing 
the Salukis of Southern Illinois at 
Carbondale. A Pirate TD and two con- 
secutive Saluki fumbles recovered by 
Danny Kepley in the end zone for 
touchdowns iced the game early. 
Southern Illinois eventually found 
paydirt, but the Purple and Gold came 
home with a 42-25 win. 

Randle's raiders opened at home 
against the Furman Paladins, who 
posed the first threat to the Pirate bid 
to repeat as conference champions. 
A rather lack-luster affair, the Buc 
offense mustered only • two touch- 
downs. Two were enough, however, 
for the visitors were held to a mere 
second quarter field goal. 

State Example Followed 

Pirate gridders apparently learned 
more from State than what ABC's 
Wide Worid of Sports called "the 
agony of defeat." They saw how a 
team can not only win, but win big; 
in their game with Davidson the Pi- 
rates proved they learned their lesson 
well. While the Wild Dogs were mak- 
ing the Wildcats pussycats. stiffling the 
Davidson offense and recording their 
second shut-out, the Pirate offense 
went on a scoring spree that ended 
only after six touchdowns and a field 
goal. The "thrill of victory" belonged 
to the Bucs by virtue of a 45-0 rout. 

VMI next felt the point of the Pirate 
sword. The Bucs responded to a first 
quarter Keydet touchdown by reeling 
off 42 straight points. What delighted 
fans as much as the scores, however, 
was the stunning performance of East 
Carolina's Carlester Crumpler. South- 
ern Conference Player of the Year in 
1973, "Crump" had had his problems 
early in the season, fumbling away 



Opposite page. Top: Carter Stadium's 
capacity crowd is evidence of ECU's 
drawing capability. Center left: 
Crumpler scrambles through a rare 
gap in the Pack's defensive line. Cen- 
ter right: State commits one of its few 
errors of the night. Bottom ieft: Kenny 
Moore tries but fails to block this State 
pass. Bottom right: Airborne Mike 
Shea hauls in a Summerell aerial. 
(All photos courtesy Raleigh News 
and Observer.) 



238 Sports 




S|jorIs 239 




240 Sports 




two possible scores in the State game 
and generally not doing much to in- 
spire confidence. Against VM1 he 
made amends. 

"We Want Crump!" 
In one of the most memorable plays 
of the season, Crumpler scored a 
touchdown without ever laying a hand 
on the football! Ahead 14-7 midway 
through the second quarter, the Pirate 
offense nevertheless looked sluggish, 
and fans began voicing their discon- 
tent. The cry "We want Crump" began 
at the 50 yard line and spread in sup- 
port and volume. The Pirates, mean- 
while, had driven to mid-field, where 
they faced a third-and-five situation. 
At this crucial point, amid a deafing 
roar of approval. Coach Randle seem- 
ingly bowed to the fans' wishes by 
sending in Crumpler. The snap of the 
ball was awaited with breathless an- 
ticipation. Everyone, including the 
eleven defending Keydets, knew that 
East Carolina's hulking back would be 
given the handoff on a charge up the 
middle; everyone, that is, except the 
Pirate offense. Summerell faked the 
handoff to Crumpler; and while big 
number 32 was grappling with the 
Keydet line, Summerell calmly hit his 
receiver in the end zone for the score. 
Seconds passed before anyone in the 
stands fully realized what had hap- 
pened, so beautifully had the fake 
handoff been executed. But the initial 
groan which had lodged in the throats 
of the fans — Crumpler had fallen 
short of the first down marker — sud- 
denly gave way to a soul-shattering 
ocean of cheers! 



A Word about Road Trips 

Still another conference team fell 
victim to the Bucs when Pirate guns 
pounded The Citadel in Charleston, 
South Carolina. Road trips for the 
Pirates were not as glamorous as one 
might have expected them to be, how- 
ever, as the itinerary for the weekend 
in Charleston testified. Players board- 
ed buses at 8:00 a.m. Friday; seven 
hours and one minor accident later, 
they arrived in Charleston. Compli- 
cations with hotel reservations de- 
layed the start of a light, one-hour 
workout at the stadium and in turn 
delayed dinner. Having the early 
evening hours to themselves, players 
were back in their rooms by 10:30, 
with lights out at 11:00. Wake-up calls 
sounded at 8:45 the following morning. 
Religious service and pre-game meal 
over, the team was back on the bus 
and headed for the stadium by 11:00. 
Two-and-a-half hours later il was the 
"Big Purple Gang" against the Bull- 
dogs, a lop-sided bout which ended 
with the Pirates boasting a 34-1) vic- 
tory. By 4:30 the team was back on the 
road, arriving at Scales Fieldhouse 
shortly before midnight. 

"Go to heJJ, Carolina!" 

October 27th saw the gold-jerseyed 
Pirates in perhaps their finest hour. 
The scene was Chapel Hill's Keenan 
Stadium; the foe. the Tarheels of 
North Carolina; the goals, revenge 
and respect. East Carolina nearly 
gained the first, certainly achieved 
the second, 

A year before, Keenan Stadium had 
borne witness to the first gridiron 



clash between these two stale rivals; 
heightening the tension then was the 
fact that each team was champion in 
its respective conference. East Caro- 
lina fell victim to a 42-19 decision in 
which rain and mud combined with a 
powerful Carolina attack to spoil Pi- 
rate dreams of upset. This year, 
riding a wave of six straight victories, 
the Bucs were determined the story 
would be different. 

"J take my hat off to East Caro- 
lina. They carried the fight to 
us." 
Tarheel head coach [Bill Dooley 

Carolina took the opening kickoff 
and drove 73 yards in 12 plays for 
what seemed an easy touchdown. The 
Pirates, less impressive during their 
first possession, found their drive 
stalled at mid-field and punted. Ap- 
plauding the Tarheel play thusfar, 
Carolina backers made their last audi- 
ble sound for three quarters. 

ECU's Vic Wilfore slapped the punt 
dead at the Carolina three, and on the 
ensuing snap Tarheel quarterback 
Billy Paschall fumbled the ball into 
the end zone. Initially signaled a Pi- 
rate TD, officials then ruled that Pas- 
Opposite page. Top: Summerell calls 
the signals against Carolina. Bottom: 
Kenny Strayhorn cracks through the 
Tarheel lino. This page. Top left. Fiery 
Sonny Randle exudes enthusiasm on 
the sidelines (photo courtesy Raleigh 
iVews and Observer). Beloiv: Don 
Schink blasts for yardage against 
Davidson's Wildcats. 




Sports 241 



chall had recovered his own fumble, 
thus allowing East Carolina only a 
safety. The decision drew vocal criti- 
cism from the Pirate spectators, as did 
a call moments later that ruled flanker 
Stan Euro out of hounds on his recep- 
tion of a Summerell pass. ECU still 
managed points on the drive, how- 
ever, as Jim Woody booted a 43-yard 
field goal to set a new school record. 

Another Tarheel fumble put the 
Bucs back in control on Billy Hibbs' 
recovery near mid-field. The Pirates 
battled to the Carolina two before be- 
ing halted, and Woody split the up- 
rights again to give ECU an 8-7 edge 
early in the second quarter. 

Midway through the period, ECU 
was on the move again. Schink's 19 
yard blast, a 21 yard aerial to Eure, 
and a 13 yard run by Summerell on the 
option highlighted the Pirate's first 
sustained drive. Grumpier capped the 
88-yard march by hitting paydirt on 
two tries from the six. The significance 
of the missed point-after — Woody's 
kick was wide to the left — was not to 
be fully realized until late in the 
fourth quarter. 

Jim Bolding's interception of a de- 
flected Tarheel pass set up the List 
score of the half. Crumpler zipped 19 
yards, and Summerell swept around 
the corner for four yards and the score 
with seven seconds remaining. 

"I've never been any prouder 
or sadder in my whole life. The 
one thing we wanted was for 
these people to respect us, 



something they've never done. 
But if you tell me there was one 
person here today who didn't 
respect us, I'd say he ought to 
see a psychiatrist." 

Sonny Randle 

With the Tarheels trailing 21-7 at the 
half, the Carolina card section threw 
away its posters in disgust. Pirate 
enthusiasts, meanwhile, were already 
speculating on how great a point- 
spread there would be; they were in 
for a rude awakening. 

Carolina drew new life when Sum- 
merell. after leading the Pirates from 
their own 14 to the Tarheel 19, yielded 
the ball on a fumble late in the third 
quarter. A 20 yard sprint by tailback 
Mike Voigt and a fourth-and-six com- 
pletion to wingback Ted Leverenz 
helped move the Tarheels downfield; 
Leverenz scored on a reverse from the 
seven. 

The Tarheel defense stiffened, 
forcing the Bucs to punt. Four plays 
later Carolina hit paydirt again, knot- 
ting the score at 21-21. 

The determination with which the 
Pirates had first taken the field bol- 
stered them in the final minutes. East 
Carolina ground out two first downs 
inside its own territory before Schink 
scrambled up the middle for a 30 yard 
gain. Crumpler then picked up five, 
seven, and four yards before he fin- 
ally buffaloed his way across the goal 
line to put the Pirates back on lop. 

The blocked PAT generated a Tar- 
heel rally as well, however, and UNC 



began its winning drive. Two key 
plays — a four-and-eight completion 
to Earle Bethea and a questionable 
interference call on Reggie Pinkney 
at the ECU eight — kept the drive 
alive. Carolina knotted the score again 
on Paschall's six yard pass to Dicky 
Oliver, Oliver's only reception of the 
game. Ellis Alexander booted the 
point-after to provide UNC with the 
winning margin. 

Physically exhausted, the Pirates 
mounted an incredible drive in the 
waning seconds, moving to mid-field 
to set up a field goal attempt by 
Woody. 53 yards was too long to mas- 
ter, however, antl the ball rolled dead 
at the goal post. 

Carolina eeked out a 28-27 victory, 
one of only four it was to enjoy all 
year. It was East Carolina that proved 
to be the true victor. Respect had been 
sought; respect had been earned. Even 
in defeat, heads were justifiably held 
high, and Purple Pride flourished. 

"Hey, hey. hey, hey, EC, you're 
stiJJ the one for me!" 

The Pirate Multitude 

None of the three games played in 
November equalled the drama wit- 
nessed at Chapel Hill; Pirate enthusi- 



This page: Jim Woody's field goal 
contributes to the 44-14 thrashing of 
the Richmond Spiders. Opposite page; 
ECU's soccer squad boots its way to 
a second place conference finish. 




242 Sports 



asts savoured them nonetheless. 

William and Mary's warring Indians 
journeyed to Greenville hell-bent on 
revenge. The Pirates had skippered a 
21-15 victory at Williamsburg in the 
1972 season that left William and Mary 
visiting Richmond the following week 
for what Randle whimsically dubbed 
the "Loser's Bowl ": a 6-0 league mark 
had already given ECU undisputed 
claim to the SC crown. 

Taking offense at both the insult and 
the injury, W & M vowed an upset. 
Instead, a record crowd of 18,000 saw 
the Indians head homeward minus 
their scalps and sporting, among mis- 
cellaneous lumps and bruises, an em- 
barassing 34-3 defeat. 

"We're Number One!" 

Attendance records were smashed 
again the following week when more 
than 22,000 thronged Ficklen's gates to 
view the much-heralded clash be- 
tween ECU and Richmond — two 
teams undefeated in SC action. 

The championship game (which fate 
decreed should also be ECU's Home- 
coming] began when the Pirates re- 
ceived the opening kickoff. Two min- 
utes and an equal number of touch- 
downs later, the game was deadlocked 
7-7. Talk of a defensive battle stopped, 
and fans prepared themselves for a 
nip-and-tuck, tension-filled duel that 
never materialized. ECU drove for a 
go-ahead touchdown with ten minutes 
left in the opening period, and the Pi- 
rate lead was never again seriously 
contested. 

The Wild Dogs proved their bite far 
worse than their bark as Spider run- 
ning-back Barty Smith, sidelined with 
an injury in the second quarter, 
learned to his regret. The vaunted Pi- 
rate defense corralled Richmond and 
yielded only one additional Spider 
score — a touchdown in the third 
quarter that came too late to aid the 
visitors' cause. 

Combined with this brilliant de- 
fense was an offense that made few 
mistakes. A fluke play which allowed 
the Bucs to reclaim their own punt 
took the starch out of the defending 
Spiders: Crumpler and company con- 
tinued their afternoon-long scoring 
spree. Long before the final gun 
sounded, Ficklen shook with the cry, 
"We're Number One!" More than a 
win, the 44-14 thrashing of UR seemed 
a ticket to Orlando, Florida, and the 
Tangerine Bowl. 




"We're Number One" (Reprise) 

Only the point-spread was in ques- 
tion prior to the Pirates' match-up 
with Appalachian State. The Moun- 
taineers battled stubbornly during the 
first half, but the Pirates struck like 
white lightning in the third and fourth 
periods. 

The final Pirate score, in fact, 
seemed an appropriate finale for the 
entire season. Danny Kepley nabbed 
a desperate Mountaineer pass in ECU 
territory, shrugged off tacklers, and 
raced unscathed into the end zone lo 
wrap up a 49-14 triumph. Spectators, 
meanwhile, rejoined the previous 
week's victory cry. 

In seven conference games the Pi- 
rates claimed seven victories. More 
incredible was the ease with which 
they demonstrated their superiority; 
outscoring SC foes 262 to 41, ECU left 
no doubt in anyone's mind as to where 
the conference champs were enrolled. 
Disappointing Finish 

The failure of Tangerine Bowl offi- 
cials to recognize Pirate successes 
with a bid to the post-season game 
stung Purple Pride to the quick. Mop- 
ing to land a "big name" team for the 
December 22 game in Orlando. Flor- 
ida, officials outwore the patience of 



the ECU players. The Pirate squad 
voted unanimously to withdraw its 
name from consideration. Miami of 
Ohio. Mid-American Conference 
champions, eventually faced and de- 
feated the Universitv of Florida, 16-7. 

SOCCER 

Despite the 3-6-2 regular season 
record, the Pirate soccer squad gave 
ECU's bid for the Commissioner's Cup 
a boost by finishing second in the 
conference, very nearly upsetting 
Appalachian State for the SC cham- 
pionship. 

The Bucs opened with a two-daj 
tournament at UNC-Wilmington, 
where they struggled with the hosting 
Seahawks to a 1-1 tie. Action with 
Campbell College the following day, 
however, found the Pirates physically 
overpowered as the Camels trod to an 
easy 7-0 victory. Buc goalie Scott 
Balas, knocked unconscious during a 
violent collision at the net, had reason 
to remember the Camels' ferocity of 
play. 

ECU's home opener pitted the Pi- 
rate hooters against Madison College, 
ranked ninth in the nation in pre- 
season. Madison gained an early lead 
with a chip shot into the net that sailed 
mil of reach of goalie John Henderson. 



Sports 243 















r?4 i ■« 



m 






a former Ail-American player from 
Campbell. Following this score, both 
teams shut clown offensive maneuvers 
as the half ended without additional 
scoring. 

"/( was one of the most superb 
(earn efforts I have ever seen. 
I am quite proud of every 
purple-shirted player that was 
on mat field." 

Acting head coach Ed Walcott 

ECU tallied in the second hall on 
a pass from co-captain Tom O'Shea to 
freshman Michael Fetchko, who 
knotted the score 1-1. Halfbacks Dave 
Myles, Dave Schaler, and Lee Ellis 
continued to apply pressure offen- 
sively during the second half, while 
defensively fullbacks Brad Smith, Boh 
Poser, and Allen Levitz thwarted 
Madison's drives to the goal. Sopho- 
more Bunky Moser replaced Hender- 
son at the goal in the final minutes of 
play; Moser proved equal to the task 
until Madison gained the advantage of 
a penalty shot late in the game. The 
visitors capitalized, booting in the 
winning shot and leaving their hosts 
with a 2-1 defeat and a 0-2-1 record. 
Winless Streak Continues 

Following the Madison game Monte 
Little assumed the head coaching 
chores while Ed Walcott returned to 
his duties as assistant coach. Little's 
first game as Pirate mentor was a dis- 
appointment, however, as the UNC- 
CH Tarheels made good 5 of 66 shots 
to down the Pirates 5-2. Nor was the 
season to improve immediately there- 
after. A nip-and-tuck battle with VMI 
ended in a 2-2 tie; Appalachian Slate's 
Mountaineers pounded the Bucs 9-0; 
and a second half rally on Minges 
Field against the Duke Blue Devils 
fizzled as the visitors went on to a 5-2 
victory. 

Season Turns Around 

Before a sparse crowd at Minges 
Field the Pirate hooters turned their 
season around with their brilliant play 
against conference foe William anrl 
Mary. In a match dominated by de- 
fensive play, ECU managed only two 
scores, but two were enough as the 
Bucs shut out the Indians altogether 
While only the first ECU win of the 
season, the divisional structure of the 
Southern Conference with regard to 
soccer meant that the 2-0 triumph gave 
ECU a berth in the SC championship 



game. The Pirates prepared for the 
contest by polishing off their last two 
regular season opponents, NC Wes- 
leyan and Methodist, by scores of 2-0 
and 4-1. 

Confident that they had at long last 
jelled, the Bucs hosted Appalachian 
State for the conference champion- 
ship — one of two such battles to be 
fought that day on the ECU campus. 
The brisk November weather com- 
plimented the equally brisk play dem- 
onstrated by both teams. Appalachian 
State found the Pirates far worthier 
opponents than they had been in the 
first encounter. Scoring the first two 
points of the game, the Mountaineers 
saw their lead cut to only one late in 
the first half. 

A small but spirited crowd urged 
the Pirates on in the second half, de- 
spite another Mountaineer score that 
put ASU up by two once again. The 
Pirates followed with a score of their 
own. leaving the outcome of the con- 
test highly in doubt with minutes re- 
maining. The teams fought to a stand- 
still, however, and the Mountaineers 
carried home a 3-2 win and the con- 
ference crown. 

Soccer, classified as a minor sport 
("minor." it should be noted, only in 
the sense that it was a non-revenue 
sport), typified the problems encoun- 
tered by many Pirate sports. 

Co-captains Brad Smith and Tom 
O'Shea explained in a Buccaneer in- 
terview their feelings on the recog- 
nition — or rather the lack of recog- 
nition — soccer receives. Both agreed 
that the best team effort of the season 
came in their match against William 
and Mary. Played on Minges Field, the 
game drew only a smattering of 
people — most Pirate sports enthu- 
siasts were in Chapel Hill for the 
ECU-UNC football game. As disap- 
pointing as the poor attendance was, 
more depressing for the team was the 
absence of any representative from 
the administration to congratulate 
them for a victors which put the Pi- 
rates in the championship game. 
Smith and O'Shea further agreed that 
a spirited audience boosted the mo- 
rale of the team and inspired the play- 
ers to [day at their best; conversely, 
poor attendance often resulted in 
lack-luster play. 

Although lack of recognition was 
admittedly a problem, the limited 
budget was far more serious. Finan- 



cial considerations were both many 
and complex. Soccer's $3,500 budget, 
for instance, could not afford to grant 
scholarships; nor could it afford the 
hiring of Al Tompson as coach, much 
to the dismay of the squad. Tompson. 
an All-South player from St. Andrews, 
was largely responsible for coaching 
the Pirates during the last half of 
the season, spurring the hooters on 
through his instruction to three 
straight wins and a bid lor the cham- 
pionship. Budgetary limitations also 
meant that equipment could be pur- 
chased only in piecemeal fashion — 
shirts one season, shorts the next — 
and the players themselves had to pay 
for their shoes. Moreover, Minges 
Field remained the worst of any in the 
Southern Conference, and teams visit- 
ing ECU were; housed wherever the 
school could find room rather than in 
regular barracks which several other 
schools provided. 

Another Side to the Coin 

Clarence Stasavich, Director of Ath- 
letics at ECU, frequently found him- 
self the target of criticism when such 
problems as those encountered by 
soccer were raised in f'ountainhead 
editorials. In his fourth year at the 
helm of the total Pirate program, Stas- 
avich presented another side in a 
Buccaneer interview. "Coach Stas" 
summed up the criticism in one sen- 
tence: "The thing to do in athletics is 
to blame someone," 

Money — the absence of it — was 
the root of all evil. Contingent upon 
four things — student fees, Pirate 
Club donations, concessions, and gate 
receipts — the athletic budget could 
not adequately finance all ECU sports 
the way all ECU sports would have 
liked. Football received the lion's 
share of the budget; nevertheless. 
Coach Randle emphasized after the 
28-27 loss at North Carolina that ECU 
was not on equal fooling with ACC 
teams and never would be without a 
considerably expanded budget. Soc- 
cer, like golf and tennis, bemoaned 
the limited funds which prevented the 
hiring of a full-time coach. Stasavich 
[jointed out, however, that before he 
assumed the reins of the athletic pro- 
gram, soccer had neither budget nor 
field. Golf and tennis, he admitted, 
needed an increase in funding more 
than the others. 

Lacrosse, unci' ,i budgeted sports 
venture, vocally remonstrated the 



Sjiorts 245 



action which left it without funds in 
1973; ECU continued, however, to rec- 
ognize lacrosse, provided transporta- 
tion, and arranged schedules. "They 
were not pleased," Stasavich noted, 
"hut we do the best we can." 

Crew also got the axe in 1973, and 
the Athletic Director defended the 
move with several arguments: facili- 
ties alone would have run $20-25 thou- 
sand, and the cost would have drained 
that much more from an already over- 
hurdened budget; no other schools in 
the Southern Conference sponsored 
crew, thereby making meets difficult 
to schedule; and those meets that 
were scheduled would have been at 
great distances from ECU. and the 
student both' as a whole could not 
have profited by them. 

"You can lake the complaints if 
you can see progress being 
made." 

Athletic Director 
Clarence Stasavich 

Recognizing the setbacks in the 
over-all program, Stasavich also rec- 
ognized the tremendous advances 
ECU had made in recent years. "Noth- 
ing." the Pirate mentor remarked, "is 
static." 

For the 1974-75 football season, only 
two teams (Appalachian State and 
East Tennessee State) remain in the 
college division, a statement which 
gains significance when compared 
with the gridiron schedules of the 
mid-sixties. In 1975-76, ECU will play 
no less than three ACC teams (NC 
State, North Carolina, and Virginia), 



and the man responsible for their 
being on the schedule is Clarence 
Stasavich. 

Stasavich emphasized as well the 
position swimming enjoyed. Coach 
Scharf's tankmen were fortunate to 
call Minges Natatorium — the finest 
in the Southern Conference and one 
oi the best in the entire southeast — 
home. Percentage-wise, however, the 
Pirate wrestling team received the 
largest increase in funding in recent 
years, and a fine program has con- 
sequently developed. This sport, 
Stasavich noted, was given priority 
because of the high interest it com- 
manded in area high schools. 

Operating with a total budget only 
one-half that of the average national 
major school budget, the Pirate pro- 
gram nevertheless recorded triumph 
after triumph. Four teams pirated 
conference championships, while 
three others claimed second place SC 
finishes. Moreover, although the 
school had once before shared the 
prize with William and Mary. East 
Carolina won the Commissioner's Cup 
outright in 1973-74. Symbolizing the 
best over-all sports program in the 
Southern Conference, the Cup was 
ample evidence that, despite acknowl- 
edged weaknesses, someone must 
have been doing something right. 

CROSS COUNTRY 

Eight runners competed on the ECU 
Cross Country team, and Coach Bill 
Carson, in his seventh year at the 
helm, had nothing but praise for his 
harriers when interviewed bv the 




Buccaneer. The season already com- 
pleted, Carson regarded junior ECU 
runner Ed Rigsby as "the finest we've 
ever had." Rigsby received All-Con- 
ference and All-State honors and 
qualified for both regional and na- 
tional competition, the first Pirate 
ever to do so. The coach's admiration 
for senior Gerald Klas, the team cap- 
tain, was equally high, and Carson 
called Rigsby and Klas "the best 1-2 
runners in ECU history." jerry Hil- 
lard, another junior, likewise ran well 
during the year and earned Carson's 
praise as "a solid performer." Backing 
up these upperclassmen were fresh- 
men Scott Miller, Steve Michaels, 
Neil Bransfield, Raymond Michaels, 
and Larry Clark. 

ECU enjoyed a successful year, one 
in which the Pirates upset Appala- 
chian State and Mount St. Mary's and 
placed fourth in the NC Cross Country 
Championship held in Raleigh. The 
harriers finished their season at Fur- 
man University, where they once 
again placed fourth, yielding first, 
second, and third place finishes to 
William and Mary, ASU, and Furman 
respectively. 

"Running is 75 percent mental. 
Anyone can get in shape, but 
the difference between average 
and great is the mental con- 
ditioning of believing in your- 
self." 

Scott Miller 

Success was not gained without the 
many sacrifices of the individuals who 
ran for personal glory and that of their 
school. Carson's harriers started their 
days early, running five to seven miles 
in the light of dawn while most ECU 
students still slumbered. An equal 
number of miles were run during 
afternoon hours. Runners also worked 
with weights, and strengthened leg 
muscles by climbing stairs with 
weights. Carson needed only one word 
to describe his runners: "Dedicated." 



INDOOR TRACK 

Coach Carson found dedicated ath- 
letes for his indoor track squad as 
well, and once again the determina- 
tion paid off handsomely as the Buc 
thinclads scored several impressive 
victories during the season. 



24H Sports 



Best in the State 

ECU downed rivals North Carolina, 
Duke, and South Carolina in a January 
meet at Chapel Hill, with Pirates 
claiming many top honors. Gerald 
Klas placed first in the mile. Charles 
Lovelace. Ariah Johnson. Maurice 
Huntley, and Mark Whitmore finished 
first, second, fourth, and fifth respec- 
tively in the 60 yard dash. Art Miller 
won the pole vault at a height of 14' 
6". Larry Malone leaped 23' 6V2" to 
edge out fellow Pirate Willie Harvey 
for first place in the long jump. Nat 
Hagger and Lawrence Wilkerson fin- 
ished second and fourth in the triple 
jump, and identical finishes were 
enjoyed by Roy Quick and Glen 
Russell in the high jump and by Bill 
McRee and Charles Maxie in the 6(1 
yard high hurdle. Third and fourth 
places in the shot put went to Tom 
Watson and Ivey Peacock. Cross coun- 
try star Ed Rigsby came in fourth in 
the two-mile run. with Palmer Lisane 
taking third in the 600 yard event. 
Lovelace followed up his victory in 
the 60 yard dash with a third place 
showing in the 440; Johnson placed 
fifth. 

Individual honors were also earned 
by three Pirate stars in earlier com- 
petition. At the East Coast Track Invi- 
tational in Richmond. Virginia, the 
Bucs challenged many outstanding 
track and field Olympian and NCAA 
champions. Mastering this wealth of 
competition. Sam Phillips took the 
silver medal in the 60 yard high hur- 
dles. Phillips was clocked at 7.5, just 
missing the qualifying time of 7.3 for 
the nationals and trailing William and 
Mary's gold medal winner Charles 
Dodson by one-tenth of a second. 
Larry Malone. co-captain of the Pirate 
trackmen, finished second behind 
UNC's Hubert West in the long jump; 
Malone's distance of 24' 2</a" set a new 
Pirate record. Gerald Klas copped the 
third silver medal with a 4:15.8 run- 
ning of the mile; a true photo finish, 
a judge's decisiongave Duke's Richard 
Schwartz the gold medal. 

BASKETBALL 

Predictions of a lackadaisical sea- 
son for the East Carolina cageKS 
seemed erroneous at first, then proved 
accurate. Victories over UNC-Wil- 
mington and Davidson, interrupted 




Opposite page; Lonely paths stretch Duke (photo courtesy Raleigh News 

before ECU's harriers at the NC Cross- and Observer). Bottom. Coach Quinn 

Country Championship at Raleigh discusses strategy with his players, as 

(photo courtesy Raleigh News and does assistant coach Dave Patton (in 

Observer). This page. Top: Tom background]. 
Marsh blocks one in action against 



Sports 247 



by losses to Duke and NC State, found 
the Pirates at .500 four games into the 
season, but there was cause for hope. 
Good play in the first half against the 
future NCAA champion Wolfpack 
squad, followed by a thirteen-point 
thumping of long-time hardcourt 
nemesis Davidson, suggested that the 
Pirates might be Southern Conference 
contenders after all, 

Bucs Lose Four, Win Five 

Following their hornecourt triumph 
over Fairleigh Dickenson, though, the 
Pirates found disaster at every bend 
of their four road games. A 69-63 upset 
of the Hues by the Bulldogs at Charles- 
Ion triggered the unwelcome streak, 
as ECU fell victim to Marshall. Amer- 
ican University (in the Presidential 
Classic], and Richmond. 

3-6 for the season, the Pirates started 
a streak more to their liking in their 
home game against VMI. Nipping the 
Keydets 59-58 (thanks to a free throw 
by Donnie Owens in (he final sec- 
onds], the Bucs upended Appalachian 
Slate by an equally narrow margin, 
53-52. William and Mary next felt the 
sting of the Pirate sword, falling 70-67, 
as did St. Peter's, bowing 84-75. Owens 
again became VMl's executioner as 
he popped in two shots from the char- 
its line to snap a 55-55 tie and clinch 
ECU's fifth straight win. four of them 




against conference rivals. 

Cagers Bid For Lead 

5-2 in the conference, ECU chal- 
lenged for a share of the SC lead when 
it hosted the Paladins of Furman. 
Ungracious hosts thusfar in the sea- 
son, having won six of six in Minges, 
the Bucs had an advantage consider- 
ably more important — Furman coach 
Joe Williams had benched Ferror 
"Moose" Leonard, the Paladins' star 
center, for disciplinary reasons. Re- 
serve Clyde Mayes, however, saw to it 
that Leonard was never missed, as 
he paced the Paladins to an 89-80 
triumph with 30 points. The Pirates, 
however, were not without stars of 
their own: Reggie Lee hit for 15 points; 
Nicky White. 14; Donnie Owens. 12; 
and Greg Ashorn and Tom Marsh, 10 
each. 

Old Dominion's Monarchs found 
victory at Greenville, too, but not 
without a struggle. Trailing by twenty 
points wilh ten minutes left in the 
game, the Pirates suddenly sprang to 
life, offensively and defensively. With 
thirtv seconds on the clock, the Bucs 



were down by only one and had the 
ball. Whal was almost an incredible 
comeback then vaporized as the Bucs 
fumbled the ball away and, after a 
Monarch free throw, lost 80-78. 

Three days later the Pirates again 
took aim at the Paladins, this time at 
the Carolinas' other Greenville. Play- 
ing on home court and with the talents 
of "Moose" Leonard, Furman never- 
theless found the visitors stubborn 
adversaries, and the outcome of the 
contest was in doubl until the final 
buzzer. When it sounded, it was the 
Paladins who were once again on top, 
winning the regionally-televised game 
by only two points, 72-70. 

See-saw Season Continues 

Having lost three tough battles in a 
row, the Bucs took out their frustra- 
tions on Buffalo State, drubbing the 
Northerners 89-61. Enjoying that 
romp, the Pirates followed up with an 
even bigger win. thrashing W & M's 
Indians 93-63. Another win over Appa- 
lachian State gave the Bucs a crack at 
recovering second place in the con- 
ference, hut Davidson's 94-82 revenge 




2w Sports 



of its earlier loss, followed by Rich- 
mond's 7H-iifi triumph, look the wind 
out of Pirate sails. The Bucs closed 
their regular season with a ragged 
performance against The Citadel, hut 
nevertheless claimed the win before 
their hometown fans. 

The final nail in the coffin was 
driven bj the Indians in SC tourna- 
ment action in Richmond. The Pirates, 
comfortably on top midway through 
the second period, suddenly found 

Opposite puge. Far left: Nicky White 
outmaneuvers The Citadel's Rick 
Barger, while Robert Geter blocks out 
for the possible rebound. Top center: 
Eric Gray snatches the rebound for 
Richmond as Roger Atkinson prepares 
to defend (photo by Tommy Forrest!. 
Top right: Gregg Asborn finds his shot 
blocked by Davidson's Sheldon Parker 
(photo by Tommy Forrest). Bottom 
left center: Reggie Lee keeps a Pirate 
rally alive with a shot from the corner 
against Old Dominion. Bottom right 
center: Donnie Owens passes off 
during action with VMI. Bottom right: 
Airborne Kenny Edmonds drives past 
defending Paladins for the lay-up 
(photo by Tommy Forrest). This page. 
Right: Wrestling's promotional pam- 
phlet boasts the grappler's champion- 
ship 1973 season. Below: Paul Ket- 
chum battles with his William and 
Mary foe. 



themselves in the midst of an Indian 
rally. The final bucket, a stay-alive 
shot at the buzzer to knot the game 
63-63, was made, not by William and 
Mary, but by ECU. Overtime play 
proved fatal, however, as an invisible 
lid seemingly dropped over the Pirate 
basket. W & M reeled off eight straight 
points, dooming the Rues to a 75-67 
upset. The loss sent the Pirates pack- 
ing with a final record of 13-1:3. 
Eight Year Reign Ends 

Coach Tom Quinn, head coach of 
ECU's cagers for eight years, was sent 
packing also. Named the Southern 
Conference's Coach of the Year in 
1969. when he guided the Hues to a 
17-11 overall mark and a second place 
finish behind nationally-ranked 
Davidson. Quinn also had the dis- 
tinction of coaching the 1971-72 Pirate 
squad to surprising wins over David- 
son and Furman to give ECU its first 
basketball championship in the South- 
ern Conference tourney, a victory 
which sent the Hues to the NCAA 
Eastern Regionals. 

Two reasons for Quinn's removal 
were cited by Athletic Director Clar- 
ence Stasavich: first, the Pirate bas- 
ketball program had plateaued in 
recent years: second, as a result of the 
stagnation, support for the team had 
dwindled alarmingly, as evidenced by 




East 
Carolina 




N C COLLEGIATE CHAMPIONS 

Southern Conference Champs 

N.C Collegiate Champs 
Ga. Tech Invitational Champs 
Maryland Federation Champs 

Colgate Open Champs 
Thanksgiving Open Champs 

Wrestling 
1974 



the fact that wrestling often outdrew 
basketball in attendance. After a de- 
lay of several weeks, assistant coach 
Dave Patton was given the nod to suc- 
ceed Quinn at the helm. 

WRESTLING 

From the first match of the season 
to the last. Coach John Welborn's 
grapplers wrestled with authority as 
they authored an impressive 7-0 rec- 
ord. Wins over SC challengers Appa- 
lachian State and W & M, a glorious 
31-3 victory over the Wolfpack of NC 
State, an unprecedented sweep of the 
NC Collegiate Championships, and a 
third consecutive first place finish in 
the conference tournament proved the 
strength of the Pirate squad. 

The first dual meet pitted ECU's 
matmen against nationally-ranked 
West Chester State; sluggish in the 
early going, the Pirates overcame a 
li)-l(i tie and sailed easily from there 
to a 28-1(1 victory. 

Travelling to Boone, ECI f's grap- 



Sporls 249 



piers put (he Mountaineers of Appa- 
lachian State to the sword in 9 of 10 
matches, blasting their hosts 36-4. 
Equally magnificent was the Bucs' 
performance against the ACC's 
vaunted Wolfpack. 

"Maybe this makes up a little 

for football and basketball." 

Mike Radford 

The Pirates dominated the action 
in Carmichael Auditorium in much 
the same way as the Wolfpack had in 
Carter Stadium. Jim Blair, Paul Ket- 
chum, Milt Sherman, and Tom Mar- 
riott each won easily in their respec- 
tive weight classes to give the Bucs a 
13-0 edge before State's Charlie Wil- 
liams upended Steve Satterwhite in a 
7-2 decision. It was the only match the 
Pack was to claim all evening, how- 
ever, as Bruce Hall, Ron Whitcomb, 
Bill Hill, Mike Radford, and Willie 
Bryant conquered their opponents 
handily. State found the embarassing 
31-3 clobbering even more frustrating 
because of its previously undefeated 
record. 

The Pirates put their undefeated 
mark on the line in the dual meet com- 
petition held in Minges Coliseum with 
William and Mary. The Indians poised 
the most prominent threat to the Bucs' 
possession of the SC crown, and the 
meet was accordingly regarded as 
crucial. A large Pirate crowd was on 
hand to witness the event, and the 
Bucs made their audience more than 
happy, scalping the Indians 29-6. The 
contest was far more even than the 



total score indicated, however, as four 
Pirates eeked out one-point decisions 
over their W & M opponents. More- 
over. Welborn felt that the Indians 
had not wrestled as well as they were 
capable of doing, and he therefore be- 
lieved that the outcome of the con- 
ference championship meet, only 
weeks away, was still in question. 

In the last home match of the sea- 
son, the Pirates battled another tribe 
of warriors — the Pembroke State 
Braves — but the end result was the 
same; the Bucs waylaid Pembroke 
43-3, upping their dual meet record 
to 5-0. 

Three in a Row 

Boone was the site of the Southern 
Conference Championship meet, but 
the home court advantage did not help 
the challenging Mountaineers; nor did 
it help the William and Mary squad. 
Instead, East Carolina made it three 
in a row as, despite indications that 
the meet would go down to the wire, 
the Pirates ran away from their com- 
petitors with ease. 

Justly proud of his squad's per- 
formance, Welborn looked forward to 
the last meet of the season against the 
Monarchs of Old Dominion. The grap- 
plers had little trouble in winning the 
match, and for the third straight sea- 
son the Pirates posted an undefeated 
mark in dual meet competition, 
View From The Top 

Coach Welborn outlined in a Bucca- 
neer interview the kind of dedication 
his wrestlers displayed in compiling 
their 7-0 record. While conditioning 
actually continued throughout the 







year, supervised training began one 
week after the start of Fall quarter 
classes. During September and Oc- 
tober, practice lasted one hour a day, 
four days a week; by November, how- 
ever, the sessions were lengthened to 
two-and-a-half hours a day, seven 
days a week — a grueling pace which 
was maintained until after the NCAA 
Championships in March. Described 
by Welborn as "demanding," the ses- 
sions involved running, lifting 
weights, and maintaining the proper 
weight. According to Welborn, wres- 
tling required "a special kind of ath- 
lete"; judging from the program he 
has established in his seven years at 

This page. Left; ECU's Bill Hill (left) 
grapples with his William and Mary 
opponent; Hill, along with Jim Blair. 
Glen Baker, Tom Marriott. Bruce 
Hall. Mike Radford, and Willie 
Bryant, represented the Pirates at the 
NCAA Wrestling Championship at 
Ames, Iowa. Above; Henry Morrow 
swims in home meet against South 
Florida. Opposite page: The score- 
board tells the tale of East Carolina's 
domination of the SC Championship 
meet. 



250 Sports 




ECU, Welborn obviously had a good 
eye when recruiting. Beyond the ob- 
vious abilities required of the wres- 
tler — strength, balance, quickness, 
agility, and a good repertory of moves 

— Welborn also looked for "gutty" 
individuals, men who could wrestle 
with minor injuries, could withstand 
pain, and had enough determination 
to perform to their limits in practice as 
well as in competition. 

Stressing the cooperation he has 
received from the administration. 
Welborn happily reviewed the status 
Pirate wrestling has enjoyed in recent 
years. Enthusiastically supported by 
students and faculty — a fact which 
Welborn regarded as highly important 

— ECU's wrestling program was one 
of the finest in the nation and has 
earned national ranking. Welborn 
believed that the Pirates could fare 
well in wrestling were ECU to join the 
ACC, but added that in light of the in- 
creasing financial support ACC 
schools are giving to their minor 
sports. ECU's program would likewise 
need additional funding to maintain 
its present position. In 1974, the wres- 
tling piogram worked with a budget 



of $11,000; only two scholarships — 
neither of them full — were available 
at any one- time, but a $1,500 annual 
wrestling scholarship established by 
ECU alumnus Michael L. Bunting will 
be available in 1975. 

Welborn recalled with a smile how 
his squad travelled as economically 
as possible on road trips, staying at 
the homes of friends along the way, 
if possible, in order to save money. 
Such frugal spending. Welborn ex- 
plained, might allow for the schedul- 
ing of another meet, and only through 
actual wrestling could ECU hope to be 
nationally recognized. 

SWIMMING 

The arrival of winter sports at ECU 
also marked the renewal of another 
Pirate dynasty — that of Ray Scharf's 
tankmen. While not boasting an un- 
defeated season, the Pirates neverthe- 
less dominated all conference rivals 
and fared well also in non-conference 
meets. Swimming was one of the 
sports in which East Carolina com- 
peted with many ACC teams, and the 
tankmen proved themselves worthy 



opponents. Against powerhouse 
Maryland, the Pirates hung tight until 
the end, bowing by a respectable 
score of 03-51: NC State and North 
Carolina likewise enjoyed victories 
over the Bucs by scores of 65-47 and 
68-45. Virginia, however, was not as 
fortunate, as the Bucs splashed by the 
Cavaliers 65-48. Only Army could 
justifiably claim to have beaten the 
Pirates with ease; the nationally- 
ranked cadets sunk the Bucs 76-37. 

Generally, the Pirates enjoyed suc- 
cess with enough regularity to give 
them a victorious season. The losses 
to North Carolina and Army followed 
on the heels of a narrow 57-56 win 
over South Florida in the first meet of 
the season. The Pirates then rallied 
from their big loss to Army to deva- 
state St. John's by an equally impres- 
sive score of 74-39 in the double dual 
meet at West Point. Following the 
losses to NC State and Maryland, ECU 
reeled off five straight wins, beginning 
with their swamping of Richmond. 
70-42. Next came the victory over 
Virginia, succeeded by wins over 
Catholic University. Appalachian 
State, and VMI. 

Entering the SC Championship meet 
with an impressive string of victories, 
the Pirate tankmen hosted their con- 
ference challengers in Minges Nata- 
torium. An enthusiastic crowd eagerly 
cheered on the Pirates as they com- 
pletely dominated the meet. Second 
place Richmond never gave ECU a 




richmond 
wmTmary 

VM.l. 

FURMAN 
A.S.U 
DAVIDSON 
CITADEL ^ 



4s. 




Sports 253 



serious challenge as the Pirates once 
again claimed unquestioned right to 
the conference crown — for the eighth 
consecutive year. The first place finish 
gave ECU the lead in the race for the 
Commissioner's Cup. 

"It's All between Your Ears!" 
Another of ECU's winning coaches, 
Ray Scharf has been a coach at East 
Carolina for seven years. Joining the 
staff of Dr. Ray Martinese — a line 
coach who deserved the lion's share of 
credit for persuading administrators 
to finance the pool — in 1967. Scharf 
assumed head coaching chores the 
following year. 

Scharf saw to it that practice for his 
squad was grueling, with workouts 
scheduled both in the early morning 
and in the afternoon, as the tankmen 
literally swam hundreds of miles over 
the course of the season. Coach Scharf 
viewed the individual swimmer as a 
"diamond in the rough"; continuing 
the analogy, he commented on the de- 
sign of his program: "We try to cut it. 
polish it, and place it in its proper set- 
ting. 11 we don't cut it light, it breaks." 
The Pirate mentor further noted that 
one of the most important things in 
his swimmers was dedication. As the 
tankmen enjoyed little glory or recog- 
nition, personal satisfaction was us- 
ually their only reward. 
The emphasis Scharf placed upon 



mental attitude — belief in oneself — 
was neatly summed up in his favorite 
motto: "It's .ill between your ears!" 
Interestingly, Scharf paid as much 
attention to the academic perfor- 
mance of his swimmers as he did to 
their performance' during meets. In 
fact, to aid his freshmen in this regard, 
Scharf arranged a three-hour study 
hall on weeknights. following practice. 
Considering good grades highly im- 
portant, Scharf demanded lOO'/i in 
both sports and academics, and said 
with a grin, "You only get what you 
ask for." 

TENNIS 

Pirate netters suffered through 
another inglorious season as hopes of 
a winning record — the first in a long 
time — were stored in moth balls once 
again. The final results were even 
more depressing in light of the opti- 
mism which had prevailed in pie- 
season. Coach Wes Hankins had taken 
the 2-12 squad of 1972 to a 7-1 1 season 
in his first year at the helm, and the 
return of five players promised a good 
year in 1974 — "good year" being 
defined as anything between 7-11 and 
10-8. 

Instead, the Bucs finished at the 
bottom of the pile, recording only 
three victories all season long. So 
poor was the Pirates' luck, in fact, that 




1M| \ \m 
llll i iiii 

:»»• | ||£i 



between their match with Glassboro 
State and the SC tournament, they 
failed to win as much as one set. While 
the football, wrestling, and swimming 
teams sailed through their seasons 
undefeated in conference action, the 
netters went unvictorious. For the 
second straight year the Bucs failed to 
score a single point in the tournament, 
and slim consolation was afforded by 
the lad that VMI's Keydets suffered 
the same humiliation, thus lying the 
Pirates for sixth place. Appalachian 
State claimed first place in the tour- 
ney, with Davidson finishing second. 

GOLF 

Buc golfers carded another success- 
ful season this year behind rookie 
coach Bill Cain; Cain, ECU's Assistant 
Athletic Director, assumed the coach- 
ing duties formerly held by wrestling 
mentor John Welborn. 

Headed by senior Eddie Pinnix. the 
Pirate squad carried impressive cre- 
dentials in their bid for a Southern 
Conference championship. Pinnix, 
recipient of All-America honors, 
joined with returning lettermen Bebo 
Batts. Carl Bell, Tommy Boone, and 
Jim Ward to form a veteran front: 
newcomers Doug Owens. Steve Ridge, 
and I, e.s Bass, meanwhile, strength- 
ened chances for the SC crown with 
their talented play. 

During the year the Pirates com- 
peted in no less than three major in- 
vitational tournaments, meeting with 
varying results. The first measure of 
the Pirates' mettle came at the Pal- 
metto tourney held in Orangeburg. 
South Carolina. Georgia Southern 
bested the 22-team field in the three- 
day event, while the Bucs finished in 
a tie lor tenth with UNC-CH, 

Following a 19-2 victory over UNC- 
Wilmington in dual match play, the 
Pirates hit the road again, competing 
against ten teams in the Camp Lejeune 
Intercollegiate Invitational. ECU, only 
two strokes off the pace after the first 

This page: Dr. Leo Jenkins holds the 
Commissioner's Cup, symbolizing the 
best athletic program in the Southern 
Conference, as Athletic Council chair- 
man Cliff Moore (left] and Athletic 
Director Clarence Stasavich look on 
(photo courtesy ECU News Bureau). 
Opposite page: ECU's diamondmen 
slug their way to a 12-2 conference 
finish and the championship. 



252 Sports 



day, dropped to fifth place after its 
second outing. Rallying on the last 
day. the Pirates tied for third with 
Appalachian State behind NC State 
and UNC-CH, In sudden death play — 
in which the top man for each team 
met head-on — Pinnix won out over 
his Mountaineer opponent on the first 
hole to break the tie. 

I. ess successful was the venture in 
Greenville, South Carolina, where the 
Pirates competed in the Furman In- 
vitational. ECU finished thirteenth of 
twenty-two. and Coach Cain was un- 
derstandably disappointed. The Pirate 
linkmen were simply not scoring as 
well as they had been expected to by 
this point in the season; moreover, 
both ASU and Furman finished ahead 
of ECU. the first time they had done so 
in the three tournaments in which 
they had competed. With the SC tour- 
ney rapidly approaching, Cain felt 
that the squad needed a great deal of 
work and more dedication. 

Viewing the intervening dual 
matches as tune-ups. the Bucs worked 
hard to prepare themselves for the 



main event. Carding a victory over 
Richmond just prior to the tourna- 
ment, the Bucs journeyed to Florence, 
South Carolina as one of three teams 
given an even shot at winning the 
crown. The enthusiasm with which 
they entered the championship event, 
however, did not prevent the Bucs 
from opening with a weak round. 
Second day play brought the Pirates 
within six strokes of front-running 
Appalachian State and an equal num- 
ber of strokes ahead of Furman. The 
standings remained unaltered on the 
final day of the tourney, and the Bucs 
had to settle for a second place finish. 
Equally important was the effect the 
final standings had upon the race for 
the Commissioner's Cup. By virtue of 
their first place finishes in golf and 
tennis, the Mountaineers had sudden- 
ly put Appalachian State in the run- 
ning with ECU and W & M for the 
coveted trophy; only in its second year 
.is a member of the Southern Con- 
ference, ASU would have found the 
possession of the Cup an unbelievable 
dream-come-true. 



BASEBALL 

Gray-haired followers of Pirate 
baseball might remember having 
heard in their youth stories about "the 
legend of the even year." The legend 
breathed new life during the 1974 
season as the Bucs ran away with 
the conference crown, the fourth time 
they had done so since ECU joined the 
SC. Curiously, each championship 
had come in an even year — '66, '68. 
70, anil 74; only in 1972 did the even 
oddity fail, as the Bucs finished with 
a record of 11-5, two games shy of the 
Richmond Spiders. 

Within the Southern Conference, 
the Pirates were all but unbeatable. 
Between their 1-0 loss to Furman in 
the first conference game of the sea- 
son and their 5-3 loss to The Citadel in 
the last SC bout, the Bucs reeled off 
twelve straight victories. In inter- 
conference play, however, ECU was 
less successful, compiling a 5-9 record. 
In action with the ACC, for instance, 
NC State (1974 champion in its league) 
swept three from the Pirates; Duke 




copped two of three; Virginia, sched- 
uled only once, lost 3-0; and Green- 
ville weather shut-out both North 
Carolina and ECU in a rained-out 
game that was never rescheduled. 
Head coach George Williams 
teamed with assistant Monte Little to 
produce ECU's winning squad. Wil- 
liams, working with the stand-out tal- 
ents of Dave LaRussa and Bill God- 
win, coached the pitching Staff to 
noticeable successes — Buc hurlers 
collectively registered five shut-outs 
over their opponents while yielding 
only one run in each of seven other 
games. Little, meanwhile, supervised 
hitting practice and worked with the 
defensive play of the infield. 

Practice for the champs began in 
January, with one week of running 
serving as the initial phase of the con- 
ditioning program. Williams, with onl\ 
a limited number of grant-in-aids at 
his disposal, was fortunate in being 
able to round out his team with sev- 
eral talented walk-ons. 

Easy-going, reserved, and quiet — 
even when angry — Coach Williams 
enjoyed his work, as well he might. 
Earning the respect of his players, the 
Pirate mentor had no disciplinary 
problems with which to contend; far 
from it, morale was exceptionally high 
throughout the season, aided as it was 
by the large crowds on hand for all the 
games played at Harrington Field. The 
portrait of Williams would thus have 
been an easy one to paint as the coach 
stood by the Pirate dug-out. Quietly 
chewing on his plug of tobacco, Wil- 
liams viewed with satisfaction the 
championship play of this year's team 
and thought optimistically on pros- 
pects for the future. 

OUTDOOR TRACK 

Long since the home of the SC's 
dynasty in track. William and Mary 
had gotten a jump on other conference 
schools by being the first to offer 
grant-in-aids in this sport; with both 
money to recruit with and a winning 
tradition to recruit to. the Indian coach 
had consistently fielded a powerful 
team. The Pirates, perennial conten- 
ders, hoped the outcome would be 
different in 1974. 

Opening against NC State and Wake 
Forest, the trackmen scored ten first 
place finishes out of eighteen events, 
and Carson was justifiably pleased. 
Less fortunate in their outing in 
Charleston, South Carolina, the Pi- 



rates finished second to Baptist Col- 
lege; Baptist won the meet with 93 
points, while ECU finished second in 
the tri-meet with 47Vz, edging last 
place Princeton. Explained Carson, 
"Baptist has the third best track team 
in the South besides Tennessee and 
Florida. They would kill Maryland 
and William and Mary. Track is their 
main sport and that's what they put 
their money into.'' 

Sam Phillips paced the Pirates in 
the Atlantic Coast Relays in Raleigh, 
winning a gold medal 14.3 in the 120 
yard high hurdles and setting a new 
meet record with his time of 14.2 for 
the same event in the morning trials. 
Phillips teamed with Gerald Klas to 
take the honors at the Carolina Relays 
in Chapel Hill. Phillips again won the 
high hurdle event, while Klas pulled 
in a gold medal with his 4:09.9 running 
of the mile. While bowing to North 
Carolina Central, the Buc 440 relay 
team — Larry Malone, Palmer Lisane, 
Sam Phillips, and Maurice Huntley — 
broke an ECU record with a time of 
41.5. 

Miscues hampered Pirate efforts at 
the Mountaineer Relays in Morgan- 
town. West Virginia, hut the Bucs 
nevertheless came home with prizes. 
A poor exchange of the baton lost the 
440 relay team first place in that event, 
while running out of bounds on the 
baton exchange was cause for ECU's 
disqualification in the 880. Ivey Pea- 
cock finished third in the discus with 
a distance of 47'6", while Tom Watson 
claimed second in the shot put with a 
heave of 49'6". Klas again conquered 
competitors, running the 3-mile in 
13:57.1, setting both a new meet and 
a new track record. Al Kalamaja also 
finished first in his specialty, the 
steeplechase, stopping the clock at 
9:28.3. Also contributing to the Pirates' 
trophy case were Al McCrimmons in 
the high jump, Willie Harvey in the 
long jump and triple jump, and Glenn 
Russell in the triple jump. 

Following a meet with South Caro- 
lina, the Bucs competed in the South- 
ern Conference meet in Richmond. 
ECU took first place in seven events, 
but seven was not enough to dethrone 
William and Mary. It was enough, 
however, to give the Pirates second 
place, a finish which in turn gave ECU 
the prize it had long sought but had 
never before won: the Commissioner's 
Cup! 



FOOTBALL 

Coach: Sonny Randle 

Conference Finish; 1st 

8 NC State 57 

13 Southern Mississippi (I 
42 Southern Illinois 25 

14 Furman 3 
45 Davidson 
42 VMI 7 
34 The Citadel 
27 North Carolina 28 
34 William and Mary 3 
44 Richmond 14 
49 Appalachian State 14 



CROSSCOUNTRY 

Coach: Bill Carson 

Conference Finish: 4th 

Wvler 15 

VPI 15 

30 Pembroke 24 

28 NC State 27 

30 Appalachian State 24 



SOCCFR 

Coaches: Al Tompson, 

Monte Little, Ed Walcott 

Conference Finish: 2nd 

1 UNC-Wilmington 1 

Campbell 

1 Madison 2 

2 North Carolina 5 
2 VMI 2 
NC State 5 
Appalachian State 9 
2 Duke 5 
2 William and Mary 
2 NCWesleyan 
4 Methodist 1 
2 Appalachian State 3 



SWIMMING 

Coach: Ray Scharf 

Conference Finish: 1st 

57 South Florida 56 

45 North Carolina 68 

37 Armv 76 

74 St. John's 39 

47 NC State 65 

51 Maryland 63 

70 Richmond 42 

65 Virginia 48 

65 Catholic University 44 

11 Appalachian State 

11 VMI n 

1st Southern Conference 

Tournament 



254 Sports 



BASKETBALL 

Coach: Tom Quinn 

Conference Finish: 5th 

UNC-Wilmington 63 

Duke 82 

NC State 79 

Davidson 91 

Fairleigh Dickinson 73 

The Citadel 69 

Marshall 92 

American University 82 

Lehigh 47 

Richmond 79 

VMI 58 

Appalachian State 52 

William and Mary 67 

St. Peter's 75 

VMI 55 

Furman 89 

Old Dominion 80 

Furman 72 

Buffalo State 61 

William and Mary 63 

Appalachian State 68 

Davidson 94 

Richmond 76 

The Citadel 66 

Southern Conference 

Tournament 

William and Mary 75 

WRESTLING 

Coach: John Welhorn 

Conference Finish: lat 

West Chester State 

Appalachian State 

NC State 

William and Mary 

Pembroke State 

Southern Conference 

Tournament 

Old Dominion 

INDOOR TRACK 

Coach: Bill Carson 

North Carolina 

Duke 

South Carolina 

NC State 

Ohio State 

Notre Dame 



TENNIS 

Coach: Wes Hankins 

Conference Finish: Tied For 6th 

Results Not Available 

UNC-Wilmington 

Atlantic Christian College 

Appalachian State 

William and Mary 



Furman 

Glassboro State 

Pembroke 

NC State 

NC Weslevan 

VMI 

Richmond 

Pembroke 

Old Dominion 

Atlantic Christian College 

Davidson 

UNC-Wilmington 

Southern Conference 

Tournament 

Campbell 

BASEBALL 

Coach: George Williams 

Conference Finish: 1st 

9 Campbell 1 

11 Duke 6 

NC State 1 

1 NC State 4 

2 Duke 3 
(1 Furman 1 
6 Furman 4 

3 Virginia (I 
2 Shippensburg 1 
6 Shippensburg 
2 Davidson 1 

12 Davidson 

6 Richmond I) 

2 NC State 8 
8 William and Mary 2 

3 Appalachian State 2 

2 Appalachian State (I 
n Pembroke 3 

3 The Citadel 2 

2 UNC-Wilmington 3 
UNC-Wilmington 1 

12 William and Mary 2 

8 Richmond 3 

7 VMI 1 

8 VMI 2 

3 The Citadel 5 
8 UNC-Wilmington 16 
2 Campbell J 

GOLF 
Coach: Bill Cain 
Conference Finish: 2nd 
10th of 22 Palmetto Tournament 
19 UNC-Wilmington 2 

3rd Of 12 
Camp Lejune Tournament 
13th of 22 Furman Tournament 
8 Southern Conference 3 
361 Campbell 357 

14 Richmond 

2nd 
Southern Conference 
Tournament 



OUTDOOR TRACK 

Coach: Bill Carson 

Conference Finish: 2nd 

Results Not Available 

NC State/Wake Forest 

Baptist College/ 

Princeton University 

Atlantic Coast Relays 

Colonial Relays 

Carolina Relays 

Mountaineer Relays 

South Carolina 
Southern Conference 

Pitt Invitational 
Maryland Invitational 
Tennessee Invitational 




Sports 255 



Several years ago the black student 
belonged to a minority that went 
largely unnoticed on the predomi- 
nantly white ECU campus. Dramatic 
changes were initiated in 1969, how- 
ever, when the newly-formed Society 
Of United Liberal Students (SOULS) 
gave voice to the black population. 

In the spring of 1969, SOULS pre- 
sented President Jenkins with a list of 
ten demands it felt needed to be met if 
blacks were to be truly a part of the 
college community. Included on the 
list were demands for black courses, 
black professors, the vigorous recruit- 
ment of minority students, and — 
perhaps the most controversial de- 
mand on the list — the banning of 
"Dixie" as the Pirate fight song. 

A moratorium on the mall, a unique 
convocation in which Dr. Jenkins 
addressed the entire student and fac- 
ulty body in Ficklen Stadium, and a 
demonstration before the adminis- 
tration building transpired during 
tension-filled days. Fortunately, rea- 
son prevailed, peace was maintained, 
and changes gradually came about. 

Right: This ECU coed enjoys a Union- 
sponsored watermelon feast. Below 
left: Class break allows for a moment's 
relaxation on the wall. Below right: 
Students chat at the chief meeting 
place on campus — the CU. 



t 



f— — _ - _ 


_ ' ■ J — 


INI 

llll 


W&i"^^,*** ,„ 



m 



i 




As a result of the moratorium, when 
whites were able to listen to black 
leaders explain the reasons for the 
SOULS demands, blacks gained the 
support of their fellow students; in a 
special referendum, therefore, stu- 
dents voted overwhelmingly to ban 
"Dixie." 

Since 1909, improvements have 
been continual. The SGA established 
the Office of Minority Affairs to give 
blacks an active voice in student af- 
fairs. Within the 1973-74 year the SGA 
also appropriated $1,000 for the publi- 
cation of two minority recruitment 
booklets. Another development this 
year was the formation of the Black 
Arts Festival Steering Committee, 
which co-ordinated the programming 
for the annual Black Arts Festival, an 
event made possible through the joint 
efforts of SOULS, the Office of Min- 
ority Affairs, the Student Union, the 
SGA, and various departmental and 
administrative heads. The Festival 
was a revival of the original Black 







Week, first sponsored by SOULS in 
1972. "Rap sessions," lectures, work- 
shops, a film festival, and a sing-in 
highlighted the exhaustive event. 

In addition to these improvements, 
several black professors have joined 
the ranks of ECU's growing faculty, 
while black courses in the areas of art. 
English, history, political science. 
geography, and anthropology have 
been added to the curriculum. 

Social changes have also taken 
place, most noticably in the number of 
black fraternal organizations which 
have been formed within recent 
years. Alpha Phi Alpha, the first black 
fraternity to establish a local chapter 
on the East Carolina campus, has 
since been joined by two other fra- 
ternities and two sororities. 

Secretary of Minority Affairs Mau- 
rice Huntley noted in a Fountainhead 
article that the major improvement 
needed today was in the recruitment 
of blacks to ECU. According to Hunt- 
ley, black students already on campus 
need to take it upon themselves to 
personally recruit fellow blacks. 
Huntley also noted that the school 
needed more black graduates to fur- 
ther enhance the University's image 
in the eyes of black students inter- 
ested in pursuing post-graduate 
degrees. 

Certainly, times have changed and 
improvements will continue. And we 
ain't whistlin' "Dixie!" 

Opposite page. Top: Black or white, 
students share the same hassles of 
university life. i. e., browsing the 
shelves of the book store for a bargain. 
Bottom left: Election of Miss Black 
ECU has been an annual event since 
1971. Bottom right: Dr. Charles G. 
Hurst appears at ECU as a part oi the 
Lecture Series. This page. Top: Broth- 
ers of Alpha Phi Alpha highlight a 
Pirate pep rally with their mock burial 
of the Richmond Spiders. Left: Omega 
Psi Phi pledges draw an interested 
audience. 



& univepsfty 
survives puBepty 



Should one ever have the time and 
desire to do so. a visit to Joyner Li- 
brary's North Carolina Reading Room 
would offer what would be an often- 
times amusing, oftentimes startling 
insight into a world that was. All but 
obscurred by neighboring volumes of 
Tarheel triumphs and trivia sits a 
collection of humble little volumes, 
scuffed with the scars of time and 
trial, tinged with an airy touch of an- 
tiquity. Student handbooks, .they are, 
and an interesting tale they tell — one 
of the gradual growth of student free- 
dom and of how a training school/ 
college/university survived sixty- 
eight years of puberty. 

Page after page in these dusty hand- 
books speak of Victorian morality, 
as various regulations quoted at ran- 
dom testify. The 1929-30 ECTC hand- 
book, for example, informs the reader 
that the institution once had a precise 
schedule which regulated student life: 
Rising Bell — 6:30 A.M. 
Breakfast — 7:30 A.M. 
Recitations — 8:30 A.M. to 12:00 

P.M. 
Lunch — 12:50 P.M. except Sun- 
day, 1:00 
Recitations begin at 1:50 P.M. 
Dinner at 5:55 P.M. 
In effect at a time when "coed" re- 
ferred to the school's male population, 
the regulations found in the handbook 
emphasized the traditional attitude 
toward women — the view of women 
as the weaker sex and therefore to be 
protected by the school authorities in 
accordance with the in ioco parentis 
theory. Each regulation was pointedly 
designed to keep a watchful eye on the 
wards of the institution. Under the 
heading "Social" appeared the follow- 
ing rules: 

Calling hours are from 3:30 to 
5:45 P.M. on week days: from 4:00 
to 5:45 on Sundays; from 7:30 to 
10:00 P.M. in the evenings. 
After public entertainments stu- 
dents may converse with guests, 
but must bid them good night 
before leaving the building in 



which the entertainment has 
been given. 

Students must not dine at restau- 
rants or go to any office or to any 
railroad station without special 
permission from the Dean of 
Women. 

Students may speak to young 
men on the street, but may not 
carry on extended conversations 
with them, nor walk with them. 
Students must wear hats when 
calling or shopping. 
On leaving or returning to the 
campus, students must register. 
Students must have a special 
permission sent directly to the 
Dean of Women from their par- 
ents for each out-of-town privi- 
lege. 

Administrators also provided help- 
ful suggestions on "Things to Avoid:" 
Talking from windows. 
Sitting in windows. 
Leaving shades up at night. 
Loud talking and other forms of 
disorder in the Administration 
Building and in the dormitories. 
Chewing gum in company. 
Going to town without hats. 
Walking too near the hedge. 
Reading, writing, or talking dur- 
ing chapel exercises. 
Accustomed to liberal standards in 
motion picture content, today's stu- 
dent would likely find the following 
regulation, one of several "General 
Privileges," incredible: "Students may 
go to picture show once a week. The 
program at the approved theatre will 
be posted on Mondays." 

The term "General Privileges" sug- 
gests that specific regulations existed 
as well, and so they did. Each class — 
junior-Normal, Senior-Normal, Ju- 
nior, and Senior — had its own set of 
rules. The following regulations, for 
instance, were only a few of the many 
that greeted entering students: 

Right: Today's barefeet and bluejeans 
would have been in violation of ECU's 
dress code six years ago. 




260 /t. -nutations 




Students may go calling twice a 
month. 

Students may go shopping Mon- 
day and Friday afternoons. 
Students may have company 
twice a month. 

Students may spend two week- 
ends each term out of town with 
permission mailed directly from 
parents to the Dean of Women. 
Each succeeding class enjoyed addi- 
tional privileges, until the senior was 
her own woman, with only a few re- 
strictions with which to contend: 
Students may go to the theatre or 
to church with brothers by filing 
their names. 

Students may go to church or to 
the theatre with a gentleman, 
provided there are two girls in 
the group and they return im- 
mediately after the show or 
church. The show must be ap- 
proved. 

Student may go to the picture 
show two afternoons or evenings 
each week provided they go in 
groups of twos. They must be 
back on the campus within thirty 
minutes after the first evening 
show is over. In no case must 
they be out later than ten o'clock. 
Students may go to town at any 
time during the day except at 
class periods. 

Such was life at ECTC in 1930. 
Three decades later East Carolina was 
recognized as a college and regula- 
tions had altered with the times. By 
today's standards, however, the rules 
remained stringent. The 1958-59 Key 
specified several restrictions which 
continued to govern the school's fe- 
male population. Under a section 
headed "Dating" appeared the follow- 
ing rules: 

Students must sign out on special 
permission card for walking date 
when dating after 5:30 p.m. in the 
fall and winter quarters and 7:45 
p.m. in the spring and summer 
quarters. Girls and their dates 
are not to walk in the arboretum 
or outdoor theatre or to loiter 
around the steps of classroom 
buildings, or the benches on 
front campus after the above 
time. 

All riding dates necessitate 
signing out on special permission 
card regardless of whether it is 
day or night. 



Regulations 261 



Another humorous rule fell under 
the heading "Riding": "Students must 
not sit at night in parked cars on cam- 
pus." 

Grouped under "Personal Conduct" 
were five administrative warnings: 
Penalties will be given to stu- 
dents for undue familiarity and 
lack of dignity. 

Shorts, dungarees, pedal push- 
ers, and gym shorts are not to be 
worn in public except by special 
permission. 

Women students must not visit 
in men's dormitories. 
During the day women students 
may t alk with gentlemen friends 
on the front and side porches, 
but not on hack steps of the dor- 
mitories. 

Sun bathing may he done only 
in specially provided places on 
the campus. 
Women students who violated the 
multitude of regulations had her day 
in court, and those found guilty of 
crimes against the establishment re- 
ceived demerits; an accumulation of 
12 demerits resulted in the student's 
being placed on restriction. The fol- 
lowing infrigements carried penalties 
of 1 to 3 demerits, depending upon the 
severity of the offense: 

Walking to town at night with 
girls without signing out. 



Failure to sign in within 30 min- 
utes after return to Greenville 
from a weekend visit. 
Talking out of windows. 
Loitering with boys on back steps 
of dormitories. 

[■'ailing to take phone duty when 
assigned. 

Visiting in town during the day 
without signing-out. 
Walking to town at night by one- 
self. 

Dating without signing out. 
In 1967 — the year in which the NG 
General Assembly granted University- 
status to the institution — regulations 
remained confining. Parental permis- 
sion forms regarding modes of trans- 
portation, visiting privileges, and dat- 
ing privileges were required of each 
coed. Strict dormitory closing hours 
were in effect for all coeds. Freshmen, 
however, had additional rules with 
which to contend, "closed study" 
being among the more prominent. 
Closed study required freshmen 
women to remain in their own rooms 
— no visiting was permitted — Mon- 
day through Thursday from 7:110 to 
10:00 p.m. Other no-no's during these 
hours were dates, visits to the canteen, 
showers or baths, and telephone calls. 
Thirty minutes after dormitory clos- 
ing time the following privileges were 
denied freshmen: 




Visiting or communicating with 

other students. 

Taking showers or tub baths. 

Using the telephone except to 

receive long distance telephone 

calls. 

Washing and ironing 

Using vending machines. 

Playing radios, record players, 

and television sets or other musi- 
cal instruments excessibly loud. 

Cleaning rooms and moving 

furniture. 

If the regulations cited thus far 
seem slanted toward the female popu- 
lation, it is only because the adminis- 
trative policies regarding coeds were 
considerably more stringent than 
those regarding men. Men students 
had no curfews, never experienced 
closed study, filed no sign-out/sign-in 
forms, never received demerits. Regu- 
lations for men were adequately 
covered on two pages of the hand- 
book; those for women covered ten 
pages. Yet the University avowed ad- 
herence to a single standard. 

1970 saw the first of several changes 
in the regulations. Closing hours for 
all women students were set back an 
additional half-hour: sign-out/sign-in 
was dropped; and an experimental 
visitation program was begun. The 
first -visitation lasted for two hours 
following a Sunday afternoon rock 
concert as part of Carousel weekend 
festivities. The interest shown in 
visitation at that time encouraged the 
Men's Residence Council to request 
expanded hours on future weekends, 
and the administration willingly 
agreed. By the end of spring term, men 
students were enjoying visitation on 
any weekend the MRC requested. 
Hours were from 7:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. 
During summer vacation, the MRC 
Executive Council successfully argued 
for permanent weekend visitation 
privileges. 

In October, 1970. the MRC moved to 
have visitation installed on a daily 
basis, with hours extended from noon 
until women's curfew. Dr. Jenkins 
replied by appointing an Ad-Doc com- 
mittee to investigate such an expan- 
sion. Months dragged by. and the stu- 
dent body became increasingly an- 
xious and bothered by what it con- 

This page: Visitation eases dorm liv- 
ing. Opposite page: Frequent Foun- 
tainhead articles praise the success of 
ECU's co-ed hall. 



262 Regulations 



Fountainhead 



GREENVILLE N.C. IX SEPT. 1973/VOL. 5, NO. 4 
MMIMMMMMMMMIMW 



Living no different 



Co-ed dorm has a 'good start' 



Garrett Hall, ECU'S first co-ed 
dorm, is reported off to a good start 
and doing well by the administrators, 
despite its questionable status last 
year and claims of apathy 



allowed for everyone involved to get 
settled in But she said "so far its 
going great." The first social event of 
Garrett, a courtyard cookout, was 
described by Ms. Kleppinger as "Real 
good (turnout), lots of fun." She 
explained that the students had gotten 
along well together 



This question 
residents appear 
or break the^^ 
dorm. "I thin! %0>a 
into Garrett ' 

co-ed : 
work, tr 



i/>j 



disinterest of several residents. _ _-■••_ — ~% f\ rt O 

Sert-Hmitng hours poss 

OCII |iiil 9 ^ Joe calder, sch<* <K 



.<^ 



By MIKE PARSONS 

Staft Writer 



resolution, conn 
;urity. Thi 
ot $21 .00° ,or >he 






of responsible lnere are S0C j a | rooms between the 

■<e what will make men's and women's sides "where 

of Garrett students are encouraged to meet and 

^ - moved interact at all times. These rooms are 

ne open 24 hours a day." 

A new type of government has been 

^^ seated to fit the co-ed situation of 

^^% ^ *' There will be co-ed coordl- 

^^^ *»lch Ms Kleppinger de- 

nmary programmers. 

/ill strive for 

i the dorm) 



"•c. 



^ 



expendit 

? s n fnad 6 d^r,-o .he present 

explained. ,,„H, h p need tor additional J 

Ca,der SSJSSSSI the difficulty 

expense with observe officers- ' , 

of obtaining goodsecu^V Atter ,.A^ 
takes tir^t. hire them he sa ft^ 

vou have to send them to a ao* 






°*e r>i 






^ri,t,on to the present budget, c , ^ <s^ &, X.olV 8 " 



^C, 



"u. 



»>. 



G * 



«t« 



3/ 0v, 












^ 






*» A *+, 



:"> 



sidered to be stalling tactics by the 
administration. The sending of ques- 
lionaires to parents asking their views 
on visitation, co-ed dorms, and self- 
limiting hours for women further 
alienated students. 

Early in February, 1971, the MRC 
issued an ultimatum to the adminis- 
tration — the Ad-Hoc committee was 
to issue its recommendation by the 
22nd el thai month. On that day the 
committee did issue its proposal, 
which called for visitation on Wednes- 
day, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
from noon until one-half hour before 
women's curfew. 

Angered by this compromise pro- 
posal, the MRC] passed its original 
plan for visitation in defiance. An 
apparent confrontation on March 9th 
— the day on which the MRC program 
was to go into effect — was staved off 
when Dr. Jenkins informed MRC 
members that the Board of Trustees 
had met and had instructed him to 
bring before the Hoard a proposal for 
visitation for their consideration. 
Another committee was appointed, 
this time with an equal number of 
representatives from the administra- 
tion, MRC, and WRC. The committee 
met once for a two-hour session, and 
when it adjourned it had agreed on a 



daily visitation program from noon 

until one-half hour before women's 
curfew for all men's dormitories, and 
visitation for women's dorms on an 
individual, week-by-week basis. 

Again, there was a lung period of 
silence, during which the students 
were not informed of the progress of 
visitation. The silence ended abruptly 
one warm Tuesday evening at 11:00 
p.m. when a boisterous throng of men 
swarmed down the "Hill," swept 
across campus, and literally con- 
sumed Cotten. From the first floor to 
the third, men students paced die 
halls nl Cotten shouting, "Visitation 
Now!" The residents soon joined with 
them and encouraged a similar "raid" 
on Fleming. The "visitation" ended 
peacefully with the arrival of the 
campus police, bui the spirited stu- 
dents Were not yet finished. Suull 

hundreds of men and women gathered 
outside President Jenkin's heme. The 
police ordered the crowd to disband, 
but no sooner had it been given than 
police began arresting students. 

Ironically, the event occurred on the 
eve of a scheduled meeting of die 
Board of Trustees. Predictably, the 
Board voted to curtail all visitation in 
lighl nl the previous evening's inci- 
dent. What ensued over the following 



weeks will likely never be forgotten 
by those who were involved. A boycott 
nf downtown Greenville merchants 
was called: cartoons by Ken Finch and 
,t letter by Roberl Snell raised charges 
of obscenity against the Fountuinhead 
and its editor, Hub Thonen; the mem- 
bers of the MRC summarily resigned 
in disgust, feeling that the Council's 
constitution, which authorized it to 
make regulations governing men stu- 
dents, was nu more than a worthless 
scrap of paper in lighl of the Hoard's 
action. 

Eventually, tempers cooled and 
campus returned to normal: event- 
ually, visitation was re-established, 
and the guidelines were those out- 
lined by the MRC in its original pro- 
posal of October, 1970. 

Self-limiting hours for upperclass 
women likewise became a reality in 
1971; and in 1972, Garrett Hall became 
ECU's first co-ed dorm. 

While East Carolina had never led 
the way in liberalizing studenl life, 
it had come a long way, since the days 
ol previewing movies. Gone was the 
dress code, and in its place were bare- 
feet and bluejeans. Puberty — sixty- 
eight years long had been survived. 



Reeu/ulions 253 





Ah, the memory of those dorm days 
. . . and nights. Winter mornings with 
no heat while neighboring floors 
sweltered at the mercy of iron steam 
monsters. Shriveled frog carcasses 
stored next to the mustard and pickle 
jars in the refrigerator because lab 
practicals loomed menacingly near. 
The "lived-in" look abounded — en- 
crusted dishes on the desk, books 
heaped on the bed, piles of clothes 
carefully scattered on book shelves 
and in closets and around and under 
beds to give the room just the right 
touch of chaos. 

One either loved the dorms or hated 
them. The environment lent itself 



toward creating strong friendships 
between "roomies", suitemates. and 
parties down the hall. Speaking of 
parties, there always seemed to be 
one going on somewhere, especially 
on those- nights when studying was a 
real necessity. 



Top sequence: Humid Fall weather 
and overladen cars make moving-in 
an ordeal. Center left: Coeds find lug- 
ging their wardrobe a cumbersome 
task. Center right: Residents on the 
"Hill" find moving-in equally labor- 
ous. Left: Parking becomes a problem 
with the first day of Fall quarter and 
remains one throughout the year. 



"Home" 265 



Studying? 

The idea of running down the hall 
lo the bathroom soon got old, and the 
novelty of fixing pizza in a broiler 
oven and then trucking to the shallow 
basins in the washrooms to clean up 
the dishes wore off even faster. Once 
the cramped quarters brought on fits 
of claustaphobia, the symptoms of an 
evolving day student were evident. 
Armed with the SGA off-campus hous- 
ing list, one 1 spent hours looking for an 
apartment, a trailer, anything 

The privacy was worth the trouble, 
and a roommate was worth half the 
expenses. The campus transit system 
helped in the travel department, but 



Top right: Ginger and Liba Narron 
experiment with a dormitory delicacy. 
Center right: Sunbathing remains a 
popular spring pastime. Bottom right: 
Study continues into the wee hours of 
the morning. Beiow: Scott is one of 
two men's dormitories that feature 
suites. Opposite page. Left: Bicycles 
are a familiar campus scene. Right: 
Dresser space is often cramped. 





Dorm Life and Day Student Memory Prompter 



Memorandum from: 

The Dean of Student Affairs 

The Dean of Housing 

The Dean of Men 

The Dean of Women 

The Men's Residence Council 

.The Women's Residence Council 

The Head Resident 

Dirt 

Dirty laundry 

Overcrowded laundry rooms with six 

washers out of order and two dryers too 

few 

Power failures I at least one a quarter) 

Waking up in total darkness in -January 

for an 8:00 class — and going back to sleep 

again 

Noisy Janitors and maids working 

Quiet janitors and maids standing 

around doing nothing more than looking 

at one as if to ask, "What is he doing 

here?" 

Vomit: 

in the elevator 

Jn the stairways 

in the commode 

along the halls 

in the parking lot 

Insects: 

Flies 

Spiders 

C ockroaches 

Others 

One broom (bristles bent out in assorted 

directions) 

One dustpan (remaining forever unused 

in a corner of the closet ) 

One trash can (bent out of shape and 

never large enough to hold all your garb- 
age 

Bulletin boards crowded with memoran- 
dums and memoriablia 

_JSav-Haf toilet paper holders that never 

let one tear off more than one insufficient 
sheet at a time 

Panty raids 

1:00 a.m. hooting contests between dorms 



(check where applicable] 

.Obscenities 

Watching basketball and football games 

on television with evervone else on the 

hall 

Alarm clocks 

Playboy pin-ups 

Playgirl pin-ups 

Black lights 

Black light posters 

Students Supply Stores calendars with 

the days etched out of existence with red 

pens or black Magic Markers 

Stained, soft mattresses 

Sore backs from sleeping on stained, 

soft mattresses 
Bicycles everywhere 

Intra-dormitory warfare: 

People running up and down hallways 

Shaving cream fights 

Water balloon fights 

Broom fights (what else were they to be 

used for 11 > 

Hall proctors 

Xold showers 

Cold rooms in winter 

Hot rooms in summer 

Parking stickers 

Parking tickets 

NO PARKING signs 

NO parking places 

Restaurant food 

Empty mailboxes which remained empty 

Sandwiches: 

Chicken salad 

Egg salad 

Tuna fish salad 

Ham salad 

Peanut butter and mayonnaise 

Peanut butter and jelly 

__Peanut butter 

Pimento 

Bologna and cheese 

Cheese and pickles 

Cheese and egg 

Creamed cheese and pineapple 

Grilled cheese 

Tomato 

Banana 

Mustard and tuna 

Upset stomachs 



Problems with housing: 

Too small 

Too big 

. Too quiet 

Too noisy 

Too far from school 

No grass for lying in the sun 

No pets allowed 

No children allowed 

No kitchen 

No furniture 

No showers 

No social life 

Nosy neighbors 

Lumpy beds 

Dirt 

Bugs 

Broken air conditioner 

Broken heater 

.Uncooperative landlord 

Uncooperative paperboy: 

Broken windows 

Undelivered papers 

-Misplaced papers 

Dog-shredded papers 

Finding Housing: 

Married couples only 

Utilities included and too expensive 

Utilities not included and still too ex- 
pensive 
No available roommate 

Those first few days: 

No phone 

No water 

No electricity 

No garbage can 

No light blubs 

No he.it 

Uncooperative bicycle: 
Flat tire 
Broken chain 
3 ants caught in chain 
Snapped gear lines 



Sleet 
_Cold 



Jike ripped off 



Staff. (X^^S^ 







± JIB: !'! I 




'Home" 267 




only for those lucky enough to live 
along its route. Otherwise a bike or 
car was a must. Cooking became true 
artistry, with soup and tuna fish head- 
ing the menu of cuisine concoctions 
and gourmet garnishings. At least 
MacDonald's was no longer the hang- 
out at meal times, although a can of 
spaghetti still added a touch of variety. 

For many the story changed here. 
Wedding bells between quarters de- 
manded a change in life style. Mom 
and Dad no longer footed the tuition 
expenses, and the need for food, 
clothing and housing meant that some- 
one had to assume a role other than 
full-time student. In the process, old 
friends lost contact and new ones 
sprang up. The whole marriage cycle 
brought school-related goals into focus, 
if for no other reason than that the 
couple could no longer afford the lux- 
ury of groping through general college 
for a life-time looking for a major that 
suited one's personality. Grades im- 
proved because of time spent at home, 
and the lights of downtown — the "call 
of the wild" for singles — were ex- 
changed for the more humble lights of 
the living room. If both spouses went 
to school, meetings between classes 
tied the hectic hours together, but 
studying at home became largely a 
process of ignoring each other. 

No matter what the residence, ups 
and downs of college life came and 
went with little regard for bank ac- 
count balance or frame of mind. After 
four years, looking back on it all with 
a chuckle or two, and maybe a sigh, 
only pity was left for the incoming 
freshmen. Yet one wouldn't have 
missed it for the world. 



Opposite page: Typical student refrig- 
erators have little to offer at meal- 
times. This page. Top: Mealtimes often 
reveal Roddy Semour in a compromis- 
ing position with son Scott. Center left: 
Scott finds his co-operation rewarded 
with chocolate pudding for desert. 
Center right: Like father, like son. 
Scott relaxs on his dad's lap while 
Roddy catches up on the latest news. 
Bottom: Tony and Leigh Duque find 
studying a process of ignoring each 
other. 



'Home" 269 



continued from page 204 

tional services; medical records 
science: physical therapy; medical 
technology; occupational therapy; 
environmental health: community 
health education; speech, language 
and auditory pathology; and rehabili- 
tation counseling — further helped to 
serve a recognized need in North 
Carolina. 

In the fall of 1972. the first class 
entered ECU's one-year medical pro- 
gram. Twenty students were admitted, 
trained, and scrutinized under a pro- 
gram prescribed by joint ECU/UNC- 
CH faculty direction. Students who 
had taken the exam at both schools 
said the diagnosis exam given to first 
year ECU students was harder than 
that administered to second year stu- 
dents at Carolina. 

ECU med students interviewed in- 
dicated that, of the two medical 
schools, ECU was more clinically- 
oriented while Carolina was more 
research-oriented. "There is more 
patient work here." commented one 
East Carolina student. "Even with a 
big hospital and many patients at 
Chapel Hill, by the time a patient goes 
through all of the house officers and 
gets to the second-year student, he 
refuses to see the student." 

Although the medical students at 
ECU had few comments on the debate 
over expansion of the med school, 
they did write letters to North Caro- 
lina legislators and talked to influ- 
ential Greenville citizens. "Most 
people don't realize what a medical 
complex would do for the area." ex- 
plained another student. "In fact, a lot 
of ECU students don't believe there 
are med students on campus now. 
When someone asks me what classifi- 
cation I am, and I say I'm a med stu- 
dent, he asks, 'What year are you?'" 

Six hours a day were spent rooted 
in the one classroom or in one of the 
three labs. The curriculum prior to 
Christmas included anatomy, his- 
tology, psychiatry, and physiology; 
pathology, microbiology, immunology, 
phamacology. neuroscience. and 
physical diagnosis came after the holi- 
days. Little time was left for relaxing. 



Right; Pitt Memorial may be the site 
of ECU's future teaching hospital. 



Weekends incorporated much-needed 
study and. frequently, actual experi- 
ence in Pitt Memorial's Emergency 
Room. The future doctors were re- 
quired to attend four autopsies during 
the year in addition to a three-day 
period of practical training in offices 
of local MDs. 

Although the need for general prac- 
titioners in eastern North Carolina is 
great, ECU students voiced the same 
desires tu specialize as those at four- 
year medical schools. When asked if 
any would come back to practice in 
Greenville because they had attended 
one year of medical school at East 
Carolina, most answered, "No." Ex- 
plained one. "A one-year med school 
isn't the way to do it. Post graduate 
work, internships and residencies, 
will make a doctor more inclined to 
stay in eastern North Carolina. Statis- 
tics show that doctors tend to practice 
within 75 miles of their wives' home- 
towns. Naturally single young men 
staying here are going to get snatched 
up by girls from this area. You will 
also have more doctors in the east 
when there are better schools for their 
children to attend. When eastern 
North Carolina is a more attractive 
place in general, there will be more 
doctors." 

Dr. Monroe's prediction on the 
growth of the East Carolina school was 
that by 1976-77 a two year program 



would accommodate 40 to 50 students. 

The basic difference in facilities 
between a one and two-year medical 
program is that more space is needed 
for the additional students. With the 
development of a four-year school 
will come the need for clinical facili- 
ties — a teaching hospital. The ques- 
tion of using Pitt Memorial as a teach- 
ing hospital will be a possibility once 
the new county center is completed. 
Pitt Memorial, however, would most 
likely not lie continued as a 200-bed 
hospital run by the University because 
it would duplicate many of the ser- 
vices offered by the new hospital. 

Although ECU's School of Medicine 
is now in its infantile state, it may 
one day be the medical center of the 
state. According to Senator Scott, 
"The basic question has not been 
whether ECU would get its med 
school, but rather whether the Gen- 
eral Assembly would respond tu the 
call of the people for more and better 
medical service and health care." 



The staff of the Buccaneer '74 would 
like to express its thanks to the follow- 
ing individuals for their assistance in 
providing information for the above 
article: Dr. Dean H. Hayek; Dr. Robert 
E. T'hurber; Dr. Edwin Monroe; Dr. 
Evelyn McNeil: William A. Dees. Jr.; 
and Senator Ralph H. Scott. 




Features 271 



continued from page 215 

the many popular films shown during 
show. Those involved in the produc- 
tion, however, seldom had time for 
such relaxation. From the initial audi- 
tion to the final curtain, the drama 
department remained a flurry of ac- 
tivity. The glistening lights, elaborate 
sets, splendid costumes, and dazzling 
choreography belied the tedious and 
detailed work that went into produc- 
ing the end result — spectacle! 

As elsewhere, finances were a 
major concern, and a minimal budget 
account for a multitude of costs: the 
printing of tickets, posters, promot- 
lional mailings, and programs; set 
materials; costumes; make-up; guest 
actors; operational expenses; general 
upkeep; and, of course, royalties on 
the plays themselves. Frequently the 
royalty on a current play was beyond 



the capabilities of the Playhouse bud- 
get. 

For obvious reasons, therefore, 
material was conserved as much as 
possible. After a show's run, sets were 
carefully dismantled, and the mate- 
rial was recycled for later use. Oddly 
enough, however, the thousands of 
costumes stored by the department 
did not defray expenses as much as 
one might expect. Careful attention 
was given to accuracy in detail, and 
this included an awareness of fashion 
changes. Costumes used in a play set 
during England's Victorian period, for 
instance, could not be used in a play 
set in England at the turn of the cen- 
tury. 

The spectator would likely be un- 
aware also of the pressure time ex- 
erted upon those backstage. Five pro- 
ductions a year placed a constant 
demand upon the student. The tech- 
nical work of building and painting 
the sets, hanging and operating the 



lights, controlling the sound, and rur 
ning the show was all done by stu 
dents, under the direction of Stev 
Lavino. When they were not in clas; 
drama students had hours of wor 
waiting for them at the studio theatr 
or auditorium. Likewise, those ir 
volved with the costuming constantl 
raced with the clock, and many a 
actor went on stage on opening nigr 
in a costume completed only second 
before by Carol Beale or one of he 
assistants while he stood waiting ar 
xiously in the wings. 



The staff of the Buccaneer '74 e; 
tends grateful appreciation to M 
Albert Pertalion, General Manager < 
the ECU Playhouse, for his co-open 
tion in providing the staff with hot 
information and pictures incorpi 
rated in this article. Unless otherwit 
noted, all photos are courtesy of M 
Pertalion. 



SYUBEHT 
VHIOI 

continued from page 231 

the year. Responsible as well for 
selecting the movies for the inter- 
national films series, the Committee 
again offered a number of notable film 
ventures including Fellini Satyricon, 
Blow Up, and The Misfits. 

In days when a quarter seldom 
bought much in the way of entertain- 
ment, the Union coffeehouse series 
provided just that — an evening of good 
music, good company, and refresh- 
ments, all for two bits. Once only an 
occasional event, the Coffeehouse 
Committee labored to make the series 
a frequent campus happening. Local 
talent usually headlined the Canticle, 
but often professional talent played 
under the spotlights in Room 201. 
Amateurs found their musical skills 
welcome at the Canticle as well, for an 
hour was provided after each program 
featuring local talent for auditions. 
With the coming of warm weather, the 
Canticle moved its lights, speakers, 
Pepsis, and pretzels outside to the 
Union patio to take full advantage of 



the lush spring evenings. 

In addition to the eight established 
committees, three new committees 
were planned for the 1974-75 year. 
Favorable response to the experi- 
mental video tape programs played in 
the Union lounge spurred plans to 
make this another regular Union fea- 
ture. The new Video Tapes Committee 
will be responsible for presenting a 
wide variety of programs — concerts, 
sports, educational features, and nos- 
talgia items. The Travel Committee is 
not slated for full operation until the 
1975-76 school year, but one person 
will be working to outline the program 
during Hobgood's term. The purpose 
of the Committee is to investigate 
travel tours for ECU students during 
vacation periods. Possibilities for 
chartered tour sites include Bermuda, 
the Bahamas, and Mexico City. Final- 
ly, a new Art Exhibits Committee will 
supervise sidewalk shows, faculty 
shows, and sidewalk coloring contests 
(an apparent resurrection of the famed 
Chalk-ins). 

The new student union building 
aroused much interest as the structure 
took shape. Named in honor of the late 
Cynthia A. Mendenhall, a person in- 
strumental in helping to establish the 
Union in 1954 and who served ablv as 



its adm.nistrator until her death i 
1972, the center boasts many outstanc 
ing features. An eight-lane bowlir 
alley, a billiards room, three tabl 
tennis rooms, television and vide 
tape rooms, a hobby crafts area, and 
permanent coffeehouse comprise th 
ground floor. On the main floor ar 
located the information desk, centn 
ticket office, and student bank; an 8C 
seat theatre; a milti-purpose rooi 
seating 200; a kitchen and small dinin 
room; a snack bar; and the mai 
lounge area. Union and SGA office 
a music listening room, and two rear. 
ing rooms occupy the top floor. 

The Student Union enjoyed succes 
during 1973-74, and as it entered i 1 
third year as chief source of studer 
programming and its first year in th 
new social center, the continued rea 
ization of the primary Union go; 
seemed assured — making peopl 
happy. 



The staff of the Buccaneer '74 woul 
like to extend its appreciation t 
Associate Dean of Students Affair 
Rudolph Alexander, Student Unio 
President Gibert Kennedy, and Sti 
dent L'nion President-elect Wad 
Hobgood. 



FREE 
with three quarters' tuition 



EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 



Volume I Number 1 



1974 issui 




Attention high school graduates! 

Thinking about college? 
Consider the advantages of EZU: 




r 



A 



Stimulating lectures by more than 600 faculty members 
53 disciplines will open your eyes to the world around you 
(especially during 8 00 A M classes I 

— Equal to many of the finest high school collections in the 
nation, Joyner Library has many outstanding features 

— located at the center of campus, the library is within 15 
minutes of all the popular drinking establishments, 
— open stacks let you select for yourself the books you need 
from the half dozen that are not already checked out, 
— a new addition scheduled for completion by fall of 1974 
will provide even more space for empty book shelves 
— With a staff of highly-trained physicians, the campus in- 
firmary is ready to handle any emergency arising between 
8 00-4 30 on weekdays Regardless of the symptoms, a cold, 
flu, or mono is quickly diagnosed and the suitable medicine — 
tylenol — prescribed 

— Starched underwear and mismatching socks are the special- 
ties of the campus laundry, another fine service automatically 
paid for in your tuition 

— Serving cold, bland food at steakhouse prices, two cafe- 
terias are conviently located on campus to satisfy your appetite 
As there are seldom any customers, there is seldom any 
waiting 

— Modern residence halls make living at EZU a delight 
Visitation privileges, self-limiting hours for women, and a co ed 
dormitory are ample evidence that EZU leads the way in 
meeting the desires of students Truly the dormitories offer 
unique living experiences — just ask the freshmen and sopho- 
mores required to live in them 

— Like the Doobie Brothers? John Denver? The Moody 
Blues? There are only a few of the popular recording artists 
who have not appeared at EZU within the past year 

— All these advantages at low tuition prices that any millionaire 
can afford make EZU an outstanding choice 




ADDRESS 



Hippie AGE 



SEX Male Female 

High Schools Attended 

High School Activities 

Grade Average SAT Score 

Does your father support the Pirates Club? 

Will you vote for Chancellor Jenkins should he run for Governor? 



Date of Birth: 



Average Family Income- 
Yes No W/7/he? 

Yes 



U 



J 



274 E'/AI MUCK-IN-EAR 



EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 

Table of Contents 

Statement of Intent 275 

Dubious Awards for 1974 276 

EZU: A Heavenly Place (fiction) . . . .278 

Trivia Quiz 279 

New General College Courses 282 

A Sop's Fable 286 

plus an unusual assortment of photos, 
puzzles, games, and a BONUS . . . 
A FREE 
Keep on STREAKING 

POSTER 



STATEMENT of INTENT 



EZU MUCK-IN-EAR is intended solely as a good-natured, tongue-in-cheek 
presentation of some of the laughable (in retrospect, at least] occur- 
rences associated with life at East Carolina University. 

The staff of the EZU MUCK-IN-EAR intends no malice toward any of the 
individuals, organizations, or institutions featured in the magazine; none 
should be inferred. Rather, inclusion in this magazine should be regarded 
as an honor; those featured herein have some claim to fame for which 
they are being recognized in a unique way. 

Again emphasizing that honest fun is its only intent, the staff proudly 
presents the first (and presumably the only) edition of EZU 
MUCK-IN-EAR. 




SUBSCRIBE 

NOW 



Special one-year subscription rati; 

«inl\ S10.no 

Send cash only to: 

EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 

Zurich. Switerland 





EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 




MISSING 
BACK ISSUES? 

A limited number of back issues 

are available at S 10.00 each 

Send cash onk to: 

EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 

Zurich, Switerland 



EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 275 



EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 



The 

"Sound of Silenci 

Award 

to 

the campus chimi 





The 

"Losers' Bowl" 

Trophj 

to 

the University of Richmond 
I ball team 





The 




"Orange you sorrj 




\ mi didn't invite us?" 




Award 




to 


the 


Tanger ine How 1 ( lommittee 



The 

"Creative Photography" 

Award 

lo 

the BUCCANEER '74 

class portrait photographer 



The 

"Best Concert of the Year" 

Award 

to 

the 1 lanneford Circus 

(runner-up: Doobie Brothers) 







The 




'Gr 


affitti" 




A 


ward 


Th 


iM 


en's Room 


3n 


ll'li 


or Austin 




'he "Token Woman" Aw a 

to 
Policewoman |udith Blaki 



The "Paper Tiger" 

Award 

to 

Dean |ames Tucker 

for his letter in the Fountainhead 

warning streakers of the penalties 

for indecent exposure 



276 EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 



DUBIOUS AWARDS 




The "Campus Cainine" Aw an 

in 

"Dog" 




The "Blue Meanie" Award 

to 

Policeman Bill Barnes 

(Chief Security Officer 

Joseph Calder 
said Barnes' tickets were 
"measured hy the pound"] 



The 

"Paragon of Printing" 

Award 

to 

the 1973 BUCCANEER 

(thanks, 73 staff, for making 

the '74 BUC look so good!) 



The "Bebe Rebozo" Award 

(o 
SGA Treasurer Mike Ertis 



'Better Luck Next Year' 

Award 

to 

the KZl ! Tennis Team 




The "Figment of the Imagination" 

Award to 
Fountumheud editor Pat Crawford 




KZl \ll i.K f.\ I \H 277 




m 



EOT; 



When 1 died, I was positive I'd get into Heaven with no trouble. I was brought up on the 
Bible and always tried to live it. The last tiling I remember about life on earth was my 
family gathered around my deathbed. 

When I opened my eyes again, I saw a line heading all the way around the Milky Way. I 
hurried into the line. After a thousand Mean I reached the Pearly Gates. Saint Peter was 
there checking people in. The trick teas to say your last name first, first name second, then 
your middle initial. I practiced it once: "Togan. Zalvier A I" "A" stands for angel. 

"Next 1 " 

"'Togan. Zalvier A,!" I yelled proudly. 

"Heaven certification number 7 " 'They had me there. "Come on, Togan, what's vour 
Heaven certification number 7 " I didn't have 0)ie. 

"O.K. wise guy. Go to Mercury ami talk to the people in booth K. You can't get in here 
without a certification number." 

Mercury is not such a bat! planet if you wear sun glasses, but the folks at booth K weren't 
too happy to see me. 

"Sorry," they said, "but you can't get your certification number without your Permit to 
Sing Hymns signed by the choir director. You'll find her out on Pluto." 

I didn't know how cold Pluto was. My frustration was calmed for a moment by the choir. 
But not for long. 

"Permit to sing Hymns 7 Sorry, but you have to take vour harp 65 pretest first. " 

"Where?" I asked frantically. 

"Jupiter. " 

Jupiter is a very heavy planet. 1 dragged my body over to the harp lab, but no dice. 

"Sorry," lie said, "you gotta get the most basic thing." 

"What's that 7 " I choked. 

"Your receipt of death. " 

"Why?" I asked dumbfounded. 

"'To prove that you're really dead." 

"And where can 1 get this receipt?" 

"Just down that chute," he said, pointing. 

I slid down and down ami down until 1 landed in a neat, air-conditioned office. Behind 
the desk sat a red man with horns ami a tail. Pitchfork i)i the corner. 

"Yes 7 " lie said. "May 1 help you 7 " 

"Death receipt," I gasped. 

"Of course," he said, "Name?" 

"Togan, Zalvier A." 

He fumbled with the cards. "Here you are," lie said. "Congratulations." 

"Is that all 7 " 1 asked. 

"Oh, one other thing," he said. "Leave your soul in the box by the door when you 
leave. " 



"EZ1 1: A I [eavenly Place" was circulated on campus in mimeograph 

form bearing only the initials J.R.V. The staff of the 

EZU Ml ! CK-IN-EAR trusts that the anonymous satirist appreciates 

having his work published. 



J.R. V. 



278 EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 



TRIVIA 




1| What campus landmark stands next to Memorial Gymnasium? What organization presented it to the 
school, in what year was it erected, and to whom is it dedicated? 

2) Name the people presently holding the following administrative positions: 
(a] Dean of Student Affairs 

(h] Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Student Activities 
(c) Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Women 
(d| Associate Dean of Student Affairs for Men 
(e| Assistant Dean of Women 
(f | Assistant Dean of Men 

3) Dr. Jenkins regarded this as "the greatest thing ever to happen to ECU!" To what was he reft 

4) What is the oldest huilding on campus? 

5) (a) What is the proper name of the arhoretum located behind Graham and Rawl Buildings? 
name of the outdoor theatre located behind Fletcher Dormitory? 

6) What did the initials ECTTS represent? 

7] In what year did the school become (a) ECTC? (b| ECC? |c] ECU? 
8] Give the proper names for the following: 

(a) Education-Psychology Building 

(b) Social Science Building 

(c) Memorial Gymnasium 

(d) Music Building 

(e) Administration Building (in which Chancellor Jenkins' office is located) 
9| According to popular legend, how did a pirate come to be selected as thi 
10] In what year was the school established? 



;rnngr 

|b| What is tin 



school mascot? 



Answers for the Trivia Quiz appear on page 285. For questions with more than one part, take one point credit 
for each part correctly answered. Score yourself as follows: 

Perfect Score: Congratulations! You have just succeeded Jenkins as Chancellor. 

20-24: Obviously, you have been around. You are either a music major or a senior who has changed majors 

three times. 

15-19: Good. Consider yourself a trivia major. 

10-14: Average. Give yourself a 'C 

5-9: Poor. You are hereby placed on academic probation. 

0-4: Go home! 



EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 279 




KEEP ON 




Streaking 



EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 

RECOMMENDATIONS for GENERAL COLLEGE 

The following courses, recommendations for the improvement of the EZU General 
College program, are intended to better meet the needs of the typical student 



Cutting 001 

Fall, Winter, Spring 
TTh 11:00-12:30 

Curriculum: Coursework is designed to help the student know when to cut, how to cut, and whom to cut. Initial work 
involves a careful planning of all anticipated cuts, i. e. 8:00 classes on all days, 9:00 and 10:00 classes on Mondays, all 
classes on Fridays, and all classes two days before and after vacation periods. Several lessons are devoted to learning the 
basic procedures to follow when cutting and to guarding against treacherous pitfalls (such as meeting the professor in 
the hall two minutes before you cut his class). Considerable attention is also given to discussing acceptable, high- 
percentage excuses that will allow the student to cut at will. The proper bearing, facial expression, and tone of voice to 
be used when delivering the excuse will also be discussed. 

Grade Determinants: A comprehensive examination will be administered during the regular examination period. Only 

students with perfect attendance records will receive passing grades. 



Waiting in Line 101 

(may be taken as a P. E. elective) 

Fall, Winter, Spring 

M 8:00-11:00 

Curriculum: Emphasis in this course is on preparing the student for the numerous occasions during his college career 
when circumstances demand that he wait in line, i. e. at registration, drop-add, Student Supply Stores cash registers, 
student union programs, sports events, and graduation. The class meets on the steps outside Memorial Gymnasium 
once a week for a three-hour session. There are no lectures, no textbooks, and no outside assignments. Class members 
simply stand and wait . . . and wait . . . and wait . . . 

Grade Determinants: Passing grades are assigned to any student who can stand up for three straight hours once a week 
for three months. Higher grades are given to those with better than average postures or attitudes. 



Sleeping 111 

Winter 

M-F8:00 

Curriculum: Scheduled at an early hour to induce the proper spirit, the course is an introduction to the finer points of 
sleeping. Dull, lifeless lectures by experienced bores and guest sleeper speakers (usually department chairmen -the 
"Peter Principle" at work again!) will allow the student to drift into a relaxing, restful slumber which will keep him 
engrossed until the bell rings or the pencil slips from his hand and crashes to the floor. Variants such as dozing, day- 
dreaming, and "catching forty winks" will be discussed as time allows. 

Grade Determinants: Successful application of the techniques discussed in class will assure a passing grade. Higher 
grades will be earned by students who refrain from snoring. 



282 EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 



Drinking 121 

Fall, Winter, Spring, 1st and 2nd Session SS 
M-F4:00 

Curriculum: Informal class meetings will be held at popular bars according to when Happv Hours are scheduled. Topics 
such as "Is a Pitcher of Beer Really More Economical than Beer by the Glass"and "How To Survive a Night of Drinking 
on an Empty Stomach" will be discussed, as well as many others. 

Grade Determinants: During the final examination period, class members will play "Pass-out." Game winner will 
receive an 'A', runner-up a 'B', and so on. 



Pre-Marital Sex and Co-Habitation 069 

(replaces Courtship and Marriage) 

Fall, Spring 

MTTh3:00 

Lab W 9:00 P.M. -8:00 A.M. 

Pre-requisite: Parental approval 

Curriculum: While lectures will at times be given, group discussions will be encouraged. Manv audio-visual aids will be 
employed, and present plans include showings of Deep Throat and Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. * Demonstrations 
will also be given to supplement lectures. 

Grade Determinants: Course grade will be determined by an evaluation of the student's performance in lab. An oral ex- 
amination will also be administered during the last regular class meeting. 

*There will be a $5.00 film charge required of each student. 



Expletives 190 

Fall. Winter, Spring 

MWF 1:00 

Pre-requisite: Public Speaking 

Curriculum: Adopting the philosophy that the mark of a man's education is in how well he expresses himself the aim of 
this course is to see that the student is never left speechless. From mild oaths to scathing obscenities the course ex- 
amines expletives and the.r proper (and improper) usage. There is no textbook for the course as most of the language is 
not tit for print. The origins of words, proper spelling, usage, and corruptions will be studied. 

Grade Determinants: Final examination includes filling in the blanks in the transcripts of President Nixon's tapes 
Vocabulary tests also contribute to determining the final grade. Originality is encouraged and rewarded. 



Courses available on demand: 

Dormitory Cooking 099 
Grazing on the Grass 160 
Excuse-Making 002 



Bicycling 118 
Cramming 101 
Advanced Drinking 199 



BZU MUCK-IN-EAR 283 



"Magic" 
Stick-ons 

Directions: 

Cut out sticker. 

Apply glue to reverse sid 

Press on smooth surface. 

Presto! They stick like 

Magic! 



Student $upply Stores 





Leo Jenkins 



®w@™@k 



Recycle Term Paper, 



Bored of Trustees? 




Please 
Do Disturb! 

Studying! 



284 I .1 Ml CK-I.V-K \H 



Answers to 



TMJIY1A 



(Quiz on page 279) 

1] A victory bell stands next 
to Memorial Gymnasium. It 
was erected by the Veterans 
Club in 1953 and is dedi- 
cated to ECC men and wo- 
men who served in the 
armed forces. 

2] (a] James H. Tucker 

(b) Rudolph Alexander 

(c) Carolyn A. Fulghum 
|d| James B. Mallory 
(e) Nancy J. Smith 

(f| Claiborne C. Rowe 

3| ECU'S 31-15 victory over 
State's football Wolfpack in 
1971. 

4) Jarvis Dormitory is the 
oldest building on campus; 
ground was broken by ex- 
Governor Thomas Jarvis 
July 2, 1908. 

5) (a) Davis Arboretum 
(b) Sylvan Theatre 

6] ECTTYS stood for East 
Carolina Teachers Training 
School. 

7] The school became ECTC 
in 1920; ECC in 1950; and 
ECU in 1968. 

8) (a| Speight-Brantley 
(b| Brewster 
(c| Christenbury 

(d) Fletcher 

(e) Spilman 

9| A pirate was chosen as 
the school mascot because, 
according to legend, many 
pirates, including the in- 
famous Blackbeard, sailed 
up the Tar River to safe har- 
bor at Greenville. 

10) ECTTS was established 
by an Act of the North Caro- 
lina General Assembly 
March 8. 1907. 




Find the hidden object in this picture, 



dna jaded e joj ^oo^ :iut]-] 




The SGA Transit Bus is brought to you courtesj of Fountuinhead, Buc- 
caneer, RebeJ, School of Music, Drama Department, etc. 



I.Z.r UfCK-lX.F.AR 285 



A SOPS FABLE 




... a strange and terrible thing happened 
— the dread plague study-i-tis struck! The 
disease spread slowly one Monday morn- 
ing when students felt a mysterious 
drowsiness come over them as they sat in 
on their 8:00 A.M. classes. Many were 
unable to stay awake and so slipped into 
deep slumber wherever they could find 




By Tuesday, the symptoms became far 
more obvious and far more frightening! 
The writing was on the wall — study-i-tis 
caused the skin of one's writing hand to 
break out in a black fungus. 




As the day passed, more dreadful things 
began to happen. Some students grew a 
second head so that there would be more 
room in which to store all of the knowl- 
edge that study-i-tis forced upon them. 



When on Wednesday morning the 
campus infirmary diagnosed the disease 
as either the flu or pregnancy, de- 
pending upon sex, the students took 
things into their own hands. A few at- 
tempted transcendental meditation, but 
thev discovered no relief. 



More engaged in the practice of bleeding, 
hoping that study-i-tis was caused by tired 
blood, but they too failed. 




Desperate, students engaged in sacrificial 
ceremonies, offering up their own bodies 
to the humilities and sacrifices of writing 
papers, taking exams, and studying 
through the dark hours of the night. Such 
efforts temporarily abated the disease, 
but it was no cure. 




286 EZU MUCK-IN-EAR 



Once upon a time there was a small teacher's college isolated from the civilized world by ninety 
miles of bad road. Ridiculed by those who attended the "big brother" schools to the West, the 
students at this humble institution studied diligently, ever trying to gain their just recognition, 
until one day . . . 




Others, strong in body but weak in mind, 
reverted to the animalistic way of life 
of their ancestral cavemen. These un- 
fortunates were committed lo Dorthea 
Dix hospital. 




On Thursday morning the students sur- 
rendered all hope for recovery. Those 
that could stand the agony of the disease 
struggled to survive; the weaker ones, 
overcome by the plague, passed on lo 
that great classroom in the sky. A few, 
unable to withstand the pain and suf- 
fering, did not wait for the plague lo 
claim them, hut rather chose lo end their 
lives by Iheir own hands. 




Thursday evening a strangely garbed 
man told the students that if Ihey truly 
sought to be cured they should "Eat, 
drink, and be merry." At first the idea 
seemed blasphemous; but as no other 
means of salvation presented itself, stu- 
dents began closing their textbooks, boy- 
cotting the library, and shunning their 
professors. 



Instead of studying hard, as had always 
been their wont, the students began 
simply lo hang around, shooling Ihe bull 
with others. 



And so it came to pass that on Friday, 1 


% 










the campus was deserted as the students 1 


m* 










went to downtown beer joints. By four 1 






i".v\ 






o'clock the disease sludy-i-tis was no 1 












longer discerned in any student. There- 1 


« 
* 


L 1 


I* • 






fore, Ihe hour was designated as "Happy 1 




r-'-VV. ;•. - 








Hour," and lo this very day it is still pro- 1 






wH 






claimed and worshipped by those who 1 






m 




i _ 


survived the terrible plague as the holiest 1 






m . 


1 




of ceremonies. Thai evening the strange 1 








1 




man who had shown them Ihe cure was 1 










\r* 


hailed by ihe sludents. 




I 


^^'K. 


1 


1 




ra 


fc 


k f . 


wt 


M, 


Amid cheers of "J.C., Superstar!" slu- 1 
dents knelt in his honor. His popularity 1 








i™ii 


1V 


Wi 


*V A: 


■i » 


1 '. )' 


was great and has since been equalled 1 




I a 


fl\ • 




I 


only by thai of President Nixon, Chan- 1 


-•fl 


is b 




cellor Jenkins, and Elmer Fudd. 


ft' 


* iiy 


l_ 






jy 


Wl 


s- 


| - 




And thai is Ihe true story of how EZl 
hecame known throughout the world as 
"Partv School." 

The End. 



EZ U MUCK-1N-EAR 287 



BUCCANEER 74. 



SENIOR SUMMARIES/ DIRECTORY 






Senior Summaries 



ABENE, STEPHEN C. Parks, Recrealion. 
Conservation. BSP: AFROTC: Arnold Air 
Sociely. Information Officers: FOUNTAIN- 
HEAD: Honor Roll. Parks and Recrealion 
Club: University Union. 

ABERNETHY. KENNETH E., Indusirial and 
Technical Educalion/Malh; BA: Marching 
Pirales; Percussion Ensemble; Varsily Band. 



ADAMS. DARRELL H.. General Business 
BSBA; Honor Roll: Phi Beta Lambda; Sociely 
for Advancement of Management. 

AINSWORTH. DEBORAH ]., Environmental 
Heallh. BSP; Alpha Xi Delia, President, vice 
President; Honor Roll: University Union. 
Popular Enlerlainmenl Secrelary. 

ALLEN. IRV1N M., Geology. BS; Drill Team; 
Geology Club: |udo Club: Pi Lambda Phi; 
WECU-TV 



ALLEN. MAXTER E. |R , Industrial Arls. 
BS; Industry and Technical Education Club, 

ALLEN, TRUDY. Commercial An. BFA; Ul- 
terior Design: Delta Phi Delta; Design As- 
sociates; Honor Roll; National Assoc. o( In? 
lerior Designers. 

ANDREWS. RUTH E.„ Economics. .BSBA. 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Dean's List; Phi Beta 
LamMa; PhiKappa Phi; Pi Omega Pi; Socie- 
ly for Advancemenl of Management. 



ANDERSON. IONELL. Music Education, 
BME; Dean's List; Honor Roll; Student Mu- 
sic Education Assoc: PI Kappa Lambda; Sig- 
ma Alpha lota, Editor, Pianist; Women's 
Clee Club: Unive/silj Chorale 

ANNARINO. WILL R . Law Enforcement. 
BSP. Honor Roll. Intramural Basketball, 
Softball. 



.ARCHER. PAMELA F . Early Childhood, BS: 
Assoc, for Childhood Education: Dean's List: 
Dormilory Officer. Hall Representative: 
Honor Roll; Kappa Delta Pi. 

ARMSTRONG. ANNETTE. Housing BSP. 
Sociology; Delia Zela. Recording Secretary. 
Activities Chairman. Panhellenic Represen- 
lalive: Dormilory Officer, Publicity; Panhell- 
enic Council, Rush Chairman, Executive 
Board; Sigma Phi Epsilon. President; Out- 
standing Junior of Oella Zela. 

ARMSTRONG. CONNIE I... Heallh & Physi- 
cal Education. BS; Honor Roll; Phi Epsi'lon 
Mn: Physical Educalions Majors Club; Wo- 
men's Recrealion Assoc , President, Repre- 



ASKFAV, Mil.TON H , III, Parks and Recres 

tion, BSP: Dean's Lisl: Honor Roll; Inlrt 

nibdn Chi Alpha. Social Chuii 





lion. 3S R 



2: Honor Roll: Tau 

Epsilon IFC Representative. Co- 
Creek Representative. Fund Raising Chair- 
man. Scholarship Chairman. Social Commit- 



tee Co-Chairman. Sergeant-at-Arms. Treas- 
urer. President. 

BALLENT1NE. JEANNIE. Sociology. BA. 
Philosophy; Alpha Kappa Delta: Dean's List: 
FOUNTAINHEAD Circulation Staff; Honor 
Roll; Modern Dance Club; Phi Sigma Tau: 
Philosophy Club; Poetry Forum; Student 
Government Assoc. Legislature, Judiciary 
Committee Co-Chairman; Consumer Protec- 
lion Committee-Chairman; WECU Radio. 
News Staff. Public Relations. 

BARBEE, WILLIAM C. |R.. Accounting 
BSBA. 

BARDILL. HAROLD W.. Psychology. BA; 
Math: Deans Lisl: Honor Roll: Phi Kappa 
Phi:PsiChi 



Business Educatk 



BARRICK. DENNIS M., Correctional Ser- 
vice, BSP, Alpha Phi Omega. President. Vice 
President; Dean's List: Honor Roll: Intra- 
murals; Lacrosse Team; Student Govern- 
ment Assoc. Public Defender. 

BARRINGTON. SYLVIA, Early Childhood 
Education, BS; Dean's Lisl; Honor List: 
League of Scholars; Student National Edu- 
cational Assoc 

BASHFORD, NANCY |., Elementary Educa- 
,tion, BS. Art/Math; Alpha Delia Pi. |r. Pan- 
hellenic Delegate; Sr. Panhellenic Delegate; 
Recording Secretary; BUCCANEER; Dormi- 
tory Officer. Hall Pfoclor; Honor Roll; Intra- 
mural Basketball; Panhellenic Council, vice 
president: Student National Educational 
Assoc; Career Education Committee. 

BASKERV1LL, ROBERT D.. JR., English BA. 
Geography; Honor Roll; Intramural Softball. 

BASS. BRENDA A.. Social Welfare, BSP, 
Child Welfare; National Assoc, of Social 
Workers. 

BASS, |OAN E„ Business Education. BSBE; 
Chi Omega; Deans List; Honor Roll; Pan- 
hellenic Council Treasurer; Pi Omega Pi. 
Vice President. 

BASS. |UDY B., Medical Record Science 
BSP; All As; Dean s List: Honor Roll: Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha: Marshal; American Medical 
Record Assoc. 

BATTLE. NAN L.. Psychology BS; College 
Democrats Club. Deans Lisl: Honor Roll; 
Psi Chi. 

BEAM. DAVID B.. Political Science. BA. 
Geography; Sigma Phi Epsilon. 
BEAN, CARRIE. Music BME: Concert Band: 
Honor Roll: Marching Pirates; Percussion 
Ensemble; Sigma Alpha Iota Chaplain, 
Sergeant at Arms; Symphonic Wind Ensem- 
ble; Symphony Orchestra: University Cho- 



BENNETT. EDWARD |. Ge 
ry; Delia Phi Alpha. 



BA Histo- BROWN. CARL. Busi 
Club. 



Club. BEAVER. IANNIER E.. Industrial Edu 
Kappa BS. Crew 



BF.CKNELL, WANDA. Housing and Manage 
menl. BSP. Clothing and Textiles; Americar 
Home Economics Assoc ; Honor Roll: Younf 
Home Designers. 



BELOTE. CHARLOTTE. Sculplure BFA, 
Prinlinit/Puinting: Deans Lisl: Honor Roll. 
Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

BENNETT. DORIS E.. Social Work. BSP; 



BENNETT. SHARYN Y.. Speech. Language 
and Auditory Pathology, BS; All As; Alpha 
Phi. Vice President; BUCCANEER: Honor 
Roll: Modern Dance Club: National Student 
Speech and Hearing Assoc: Phi Chi. 

BIDDELL, RUTH C. Early Childhood Edu- 
cation. BS: Honor Roll; Intramural Basket- 
ball; Karate Club; NC Education Assoc, 

BILLET, STEVEN «.. Political Science. BA: 
European Studies. College Democrats Chili. 
Dean's Lis! Gymnastic Club: Studenl Gov- 
ernment Assoc 

BISSETTE. LARRY D.. Accounting. BSBA: 
Accounling Sociely; Beta Gamma Sigma. 
Dean's Lisl: Honor Roll. 



BLACKARD. BARRY L.. Math, BA: Com- 
puter Science: All A's; Assoc for Compuling 
Machines: Baptist Studenl Union; Dean's 
Lisl. Honor Roll: Intramural Basketball. 
Bowling. Horseshoes. Softball. Tennis; Pi 
Mil Epsilon. 



BLACKWELDER. LINDA A.. Accounling. 
BSBA; Accounling Society; All As. Beta 
Gamma Sigma; Dean List; Honor Roll: Omi- 
cron Delta Epsilon: Phi Kappa Phi. 

BLAND. LEROY, Music Education. BME; 
Piano; Concert Band; Concert Choir: Dean's 
List; Marching Pirates; Men's Clee Cluh: NC 
Music Teachers Assoc; SMENC Symphonic 
Wind Ensemble; University Chorale: Varsily 
Band. 

BODENHAMER. WILLIAM It. |R , Political 
Science, BA; Broadcasllng: College Demo- 
crats Club: Football Team; Mens Residence 
Council. President. Treasurer; Men's Resi- 
dence Council Court; Pi Kappa Phi: Presby- 
terian Center; Studenl Government Assoc. 
President; Who's Who; Chairman Board of 
Directors of Student Union: Athletic Council 
ECU Board of Trustees. 

al Service. 



BONNER. ANGELA S.. English, BS; Alpha 
Xi Delta: Honor Roll; Sigma Tau Delta. 



BOSWELL, BETSY D. 



BRAME. NANCY D.. Ceramics. BFA; Print- 
making; Alpha Omicron Pi; Honor Roll; In- 
tramurals. 

BRANDON, SHIRLEY, Social Work, BS, In- 
dividuals and Groups: Dean's Lisl: Honor 
Roll; Society of United Liberal Students. 

BRANTLEY, BARBARA. Intermediate Edu- 
cation BS; Honor Roll; Studenl National Ed- 
ucational Assoc, 

BRAS WELL. THERESA M.. Early Childhood 
Educalion. BS: Dormitory Officer. Vice Pres- 
ident. Treasurer; Honor Roll; National Edu- 
cational Assoc. 

BRETT. SUZETTE. Social Work, BSP; Child 
Welfare; Baptist Studenl Union; Dean's Lisl: 
Dormitory- Officer: Honor Roll: Intramural 
Volleyball. 

BR1TTON, BRUCE B., Geology. BA; ECU 
Geology Club. 

BROOKS, JEFFREY G . Design; Prinlmaking; 



BROWN. NANCY N . Music Education/Mu- 
sic Therapy. BME; Piano: All As. Chamber 
Sirfgers; Dean's List; Honor Roll: Sigma 
Alpha Iota; SNEMC; Student Council for Ex- 
ceptional Children; University Choral; Wo- 
men's Glee CJub; Music Therapy Club; Out- 
standing; Seniors 

BROWN. RAtPH A.. Music Education, BME;,. 
Baritone; Concert Band; Honor Roll; Jsr' 
Ensemble; Marching Pirates; Pep Band; 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble; Symphony Or- 
chestra: Varsity Band; University Chorale 



BUNCH. )ANE L , Library Science. BS; Al- 
pha Bela Alpha: Alpha Phi, Administrate 
Assistant; Honor Roll. 

BUNCH. MICAEL L . Accounling Society 

BURKE, GREG. Correctional Services. BSP. 
Law Enforcement Correction; Football Team. 
Indoor Track. Ouldoor Track 

BURKHEAD. MARY. Clothing * Textiles. 
BS. Housing & Home Management; AH A's; 
American Home Economics Assoc: Campus 
Union Committee; Dean's Lisl. Honor Roll; 
Intramural Basketball; Young Home De- 
signers. 

BYRD. MARTHA C. Home Economics Ed- 
ucalion. BS: All A's: American Home Eco- 
nomics Assoc: Dean's Lisl; Home Econom- 
ics; Honor Roll: Phi Upsilon Omicron. Chap- 
lain: Student Advisory Council in Home Ec. 
Dept. 

BXRD. WILLIAM C, III. Psychology. BA: 
Hislory; All A's; Dormitory Officer. Presi- 
dent: Inlr am oral Baskel ball: Softball: Tennis. 

8YRUM. BETTY N.. Intermediate Educalion. 
BS: Dean's List; Delia Thela Chi: Dormilorj 
Officer. President, Vice Presidenl, Secre- 
tary; Gamma Sigma Sigma; Girls Volleyball: 
Honor Roll; Inlramurals; Student Govern- 
ment Assoc: Women's Recreation Assoc; 
Women's Residence Council 

CA|IGAL. PETER L . Ceramics. BS: Dormi- 
tory Officer. International Relations Club: 
Men's Residence Council, National Educa- 
tional Association. Spanish Club. Vice-Pres- 



CALHOUN. WALTER T.. Biolog> , BSP. All 
A's; Dean's List; Honor Roll; Phi Kappa Phi. 



CAMPBELL. SL'SAN D.. Psychology, BA; 
Sociology; All As; Deans Lisl; Phi Kappa 
Phi;PsiChi. 



CARNRIGHT. LUCILLE F.. Early Childhood 
Educalion/Special Education. BS: Assoc, for 
Childhood Education; Dean's List; Honor 
Roll: National Education Assoc 

CARROLL. ALLEN. Indusirial Arls. BS; Col 
lege Democrats Club: Honor Roll. 

CARSON. DEBRA [., Accounting. BSBA; 
Accounting Sociely. Presidenl; Beta Gamma 
Sigma; BUCCANEER, Business Manager: 
Honor Roll; Phi Kappa Phi; Omicron Delta 
Epsilon. Secretary: Who's Who; Ouislandine 
Senior in Accounting; Outstanding Woman 
Studenl in Accounting. 

CARTER.. ARCHIE T. Accounling. BSBA. 
Accounting Society: Dean's List: Football 
Team: Honor Roll: Intramural Baseball. Bas- 
ketball: Phi Beta Lambda. 




- -iior Summarie 



CASICO. MICHAEL. Correctional Service. 
BSP: Coramunily, Concurl Band: Inlramural 
Basketball; Phi Kappa Tau. Treasurer 

CASTELLO. 1UL1A Inlermediale Educalion. 
BS; Dormitory Officer. Secretary; Inlra- 
mural Volley ball. 

CAULTON, KEVIN W . Business Finance. 
BSBA; Deans Lisl: Dormitory Huuse Coun- 
cil: Honor Roll: Inlramural Rel. Karale Clu b; 
Wrestling Team: Coffee House Commillee. 



GLAGON, THOMAS I.. Busi 



sF.dur. 



CLAIBORNE IANET M , Heallh and Physi- 
cal Educalion, BS: All As: Deans Lisl: Girls 
Basketball. Girls Volleyball: Honor Roll: In- 
lramurals Phi Epsilon Mu: Who's Who: Wo- 
men's Intercollegiate Baskelball: Women's 
Recrealion Assoc 

CLARK. HENRY V . Psychology, BA; Biolo- 
gy/Chemistry, American Chemical Soc: Chi 
Beta Phi. Dean's Lisl: Karale Club: Pre-Med 
* Pre-Denia! Society: Psychology Club: Psi 
Chi. 

CLEMENT. MARY, Home Economics. BS: 
All As: American Home Economics Assoc , 
Treasurer: Dean's Lisl; Home Economics 
Club; Honor Roll: Inlramural Softball: Field 
Hockey: Phi Kappa Phi; Phi Upsiion Omi- 



CLEMORS. MICHAEL C. Social Welfare. 
BSP; Individuals and Croups. Dean's Lisl: 
Honor Roll. 

COBLE. RAY M , Accounting. BSBA; La- 



COBURN. VERONIA. Psychology, BA; Soci- 
ology; Delia Sigma Thela. Treasurer; Honor 
Roll: Society of Uniled Liberal Students. 

COGGINS. CAROL S.. Medical Record Sci- 
ence: BSP. All As Baptist Sludenl Union: 
Dean's Lisl: Dormitory Officer. House Coun- 
cil; Inlramural Baskelball; Student Govern- 
ment Legislature. 

COLE. GENE, Parks. Recrealion and Con- 
servalion. BSP: AFROTC: Deans LislrParks 
and Recreation Club; Veterans Club 

COLLIER. DORA B„ Intermediate Educa- 
lion. BS: Dean's Lisl; Kappa Delia Pi; Slu- 
denl National Educalionai Assoc; Outstand- 
ing Women's Student in Intermediate Ed. 

COLLINS. [AMES W.. Distributive Erluca- 
lion. BSBA; Basic Business, Inlramurals; 
Kappa Sigma; Phi Bela Lambda; Society for 
Advancemenl of Management 

COLQUITT. BARBARA K.. Clothing and 
Textiles, BS: Child Development: Alpha Phi, 
Vice President; Dean's Lisl. 

CONARD. DEBRA, Social Work. BSP: Honor 
Roll. 

CONYERS. V, LEE. |R , General Business. 
BSBA; Bela Camma Sigma: Honru^Roll. 
Omicron Delta Epsilon; Phi Kappa Phi; Soci- 
ety for Advancement of Management. 

COOK, ELIZABETH H . Social Work, BSP: 
Dean's List; Honor Roll; National Associa- 
tion for Social Workers. 

COOLEY. JAN E.. Commercial Art. BFA: 
Painting: Delta Phi Delia. Design Associates; 
Cirls Tennis. Honor Roll 
CORR1KER CYNTHIA S-, Commercial An. 
BFA; Prinlmaking/European Studies. 

COX. GAIL D. 

COX. CUY O., |R.. Science Education. BS: 
AFROTC: Assoc, for Computing Machines: 



Cheerleader; FOUNTAINHEAD. Honor 
Roll; Lambda Chi Alpha; Sociely of Physics 
Students. 

CRAVEN. MICHAEL E.. Business Admini- 
stralion. BSBA; Real Estate; Inlramural Bas- 
kelball. Softball. 

CRAWFORD. HARRY R„ Accounting. BSBA, 

CRAWFORD. PATRICIA A . Political Sci- 
ence. BA; lournahsm; Alpha Phi Gamma. 
"'Bean's List: FOUNTAINHEAD, Staff Writer. 
Assistant News Editor. News Editor. Editor; 
Honor Roll: Pi Sigma Alpha. WECU Radio. 
Announcer: Who's Who. Political Science 
Honors Scholarship; Civil Service Outstand- 
ing Achievement Award. Outstanding Wo- 
man Student in Polilical Science 



CRIBBS, ]ERRY S . Voice. BMME: Piano: All 
As; Chamber Singers; Marching Pirates: 
Men's Glee Club; Opera Workshop; Univer- 
sity Chorale; Varsity Band; Chairman School 
of Music Sludenl Forum 

CROMARTIE, MARY B.. Ceramics. BFA, 
Crafls/Design; Ceramics Guild. Film Com- 
mittee; Circus-Nimbus Observers Unlimited. 

CRON1N. |AMES M., Political Science, BA, 
F:uropean Studies; Honor Roll: Pi Sigma Al- 
pha. 

CROTTS. DEBORAH B.. Commercial Arl. 
BFA; Interior Design. Dean's List: Delia Phi 
Delta. President; Design Associales. Secre- 
tary & Treasurer; Honor Roll: Inlramural 
Tennis: Sludenl Government Association; 
University Curriculum Committee: Academ- 
ic Alfairs Committee. 

CROVITZ. MATHEW S.. Malh. BS: Assoc, 
for Computing Machines; Math Club. Vice 



Student Governmenl Assoc. Cabinet; Union 
Bowling League; Veterans Club; Who's Who. 
NC Student Legislature. Notional Model 
United Nalions; Greenville City Council; 
HumanRelationsCounr.il. 

DAVIS. MAMIE L.. Child Development. BS; 
Psychology: American Home Economics 
Assoc. Delia Sigma Thela. Omum Eta Chi. 
Drama Club. Cheerleader 



CURRY. LARRY W 

CUTTS. KAREN B„ Home Economics Edu- 
calion. BS: Ail As; Dean's Lisl: Honor Roll: 
Phi Upsiion Omicron 

CUTIS. VICK1 M.. Speech, Language, and 
Auditory Pathology, BS; Chi Omega; Gamma 
Beta Phi; Honor Roll; Inlramurals Baskel- 
ball, Volleyball. Football; National Student 
Speech arid Hearing Assoc. Panhellenic 
Council. 

DAMERON. BEVERLY, Speech Pathology/ 
Andiology, BS: Cheerleaders: Honor Roil; 
Miss ECU Football; School Spirit Committee: 
WECU Radio: Nalional Student Speech and 
Hearing Association. 



DAUGHTRY, PATRICIA A , Nursing. BSN: 
Honor Roll; Presbyterian Center; Sludenl 
Nurses Assoc. President. Historian: He, in 5 
Advisory Council 



DAVIES. RALPH D.. Business Education. 
BSBE: Dean's Lisl. Honor Roll. Phi Beta 
Lambda: Pi Omega Pi. 

DAVIS. CAROLYN A , English. BA. |ournal- 
ism. Alpha Phi Gamma; Dean's Lisl. FOUN- 
TAINHEAD: Camma Bela Phi. Honor Roll; 
Sigma Tau Delta; University Union, Enler- 



DAV1S. DEBORAH E„ Prinlmaking, BFA; 
Design: Dean's List; Honor Roll 

DAVIS. ]AMES H.. Sociology/Polilical Sci- 
ence, BA; Alpha Kappa Delia; Dean's Lisl; 
Honor Roll: Inlramurals Pi Sigma Alpha; 



DEES, MARY M„ Inlermediale Educalion. 
BS; All A's: Alpha Xi Delta. President: 
Dean's List. Honor Roll; Kappa Delia Pi; Slu- 
denl National Educational Assoc. 

DELAMAR, DENNIS W.. Elementary/Inter- 
mediate Education, BS: All A's: Dea'n'sList: 
Honor Roll. N.C. Education Assoc: Student 
Nalional Educalionai Assoc; Mr. Sludenl 

DEMPSEY. IOA.NNA H.. Medical Record 
Science. BSP: All A's: Dean's Lisl; Honor 
Roll: American Medical Record Assoc , Phi 
Kappa Phi. 



DENNY, KATHRYN E.. Psychology. BA; So- 
ciology; Dean's List; Honor Roll; Psi Chi; 
Women's Residence Council. 

DEWAR. THERESA E . Early Childhood Ed- 
ucalion. BS: Dean's Lisl; Honor Roll; Phi 
Kappa Phi: Sludenl National Educational 



DISHAROON. JANICE, Social Work, BSP 

DIXON. EMILY M., Home Economics Edu- 
calion, BS: American Home Economics 
Assoc; Home Economics Clob. 

DODD. DEBRA A,. Speech, Language, Audi- 
tory Pathology. BS: Cheerleader: Chi Omega. 
Pledge Trainer; Deans Lisl. Dormitory Of- 
ficer: Gamma Delta Phi; Honor Roll: inlra- 
mural Foolbali. Volleyball. Softball. Basket- 
ball; Marshal; Nalional Sludenl Speech and 
Hearing Assoc; Pi Omega Pi: University 
Union: Special Events Committee. 

DOLLAR. KENNETH L , Accounting soclet) 
Men's Glee Club; SocietJ lor Advancemenl 
of Management 

DOWD, JUDY I, . Library Science. BS: Honor 



DREW. DOUGLAS D . Physical Therapy. BS; 
Honor Roll; Physical Therapy Club. 

DUBOSE. KATHERINE L.. Mathematics. BS. 
Dean s Lisl; Honor Roll; Pi Mu Epsilon. 

DUNNING, MEI.L1SSA M.. Medical Record 
Science, BSP. Dean's List: Dormitory Offi- 
cer; Honor Roll; American Medical Record 



DUPREE. DEBORAH L.. French. BS, 

DUTTON. LEWIS F... Accounting Society 
Beta Gamma Sigma; Dean's List. Inlramura 
Softball: Phi Beta Lambda. President, Na 

nonal Vice President, Phi Kappa Phi: SocieP, 
for ■Vlvaiu.om.-nlnf Management 



EASTWOOD. NORMAN E., Indu 
BS: Epsilon Pi Tau; Honor Roll. 



EDMONDS. LEON II Correctional Ser- 
vices, BSP. Dean's Lisl; Honor Roll. Inlra- 
mural Baskelball Karale Club 

EDWARDS. BARBARA M . Accounlirusi 
BSBA. Beta Gamma Sigma; Dean's List. Hon- 
or Roll: Omicron Delta Epsilon. Pi Kappa 



EDWARDS. IAMF.S I. . Correctional Service 

BSP. Law Enforcement. Dean's List: Honor 
Roll; Veterans Club. 

EDWARDS. MICHAEL D.. History/Anthro- 
pology. BA; FOUNTAINHEAD. Circulation 
Manager; Inlramurals; Sigma Tau Sigma. 
Recording Secretary; Sludenl Governmen> 
Assoc , Legislature. Co-Chairman Rules 
Commillee: Chairman Appropriations Corn- 
Speaker Pro Tempore Parliamentarian: Besi 



El IRE, DONNA C , Housing and Manage- 
ment. BSP: Child Develnpmenl/Familv Re- 
lations, Home Economics Club; Young Home 
Designers. 

EVANS. VICKI V . Early Childhood Educa- 
lion, BS. Ass,,. I,„ Childhood Education; 
Dean's Lisl; Honor Roll. Inlramural Volley- 
ball; Nalional Educalionai Assoc N.C Ed- 
ucalion Assoc; Student National Educalion- 



FACE. WILLIAM C, III, Parks, Recreation. 
and Conservation, BSP. Cymnasfic Club: 
Honor Roll, Indoor Track: Inlramural Bas- 
ketball. Football, Outdoor Track Parks and 
Recreation Club. Track Team UmVersfl) 
Union: Phi Epsilon Kappa 

FAILING. BARBARA A, Medical Records 
Science. BSP: All A's. Dean's Lisl; Honor 

Roll American Medical Record Assoc 

FAISON. PAMELA A Medical Records Ad- 



FERCUSON. EDWIN G . Polilical Science. 
BA; Eoropean Studies, Deans List; Gamma 
Bela Phi. Honor Roll. Inlramurals. Football. 
Badminton. Baskelball. Kappa Sigma: Law 
Society; Men's Residence Council, Pi Sigma 
Alpha; Slodonl Governmenl Assoc: Tennis 



FERNANDEZ. RAYMOND. |R . 



FITZGERALD. LAURA It, English, BS; Ed- 
ucation; All AS: Dean's List; Honor Roll; 
Sigma Tau Delta 

FITZSIMMONS. DORA. Heallh and Phvsi-' 
ral Education. BS. Dean's List, Cirls Basket- 
hall; Girls Field llockev. Intramural Soft 
ball. Sludenl National Educational Assol 
Women's Intercollegiate Basketball. 

FLEMING. PATRICIA I.. English, BS, Honor 
Roll: Sigma Tan Delta Secret. in 
FLOWERS. RAMONA I., Home Economics 
Education, BS, American Home Economics 
Assoc.. Baptist 8ludent Union; Dean's Lisl 

FLOYD. LAWRENCE N Marketing. BSBA: 
General Business Administration; Honor 
Roll; Inlramural Baskelball: Softball; Fool- 
ball. Sigma Phi Epsilon; Society for Ad- 
vancement nf Management 



Senior Summaries 291 







IIASKFTI 1 
rial and Tech- As: Chi Beta Phi: 
ilinn BS; Dean's List; Epsilon Pi Phi: League of Scholars; N.C. Leadership 
in Honor Roll: Industry and rechnieal Foundation: Phi Kappa Phi: Psi Chi. Prcsi- 
Kdm.Htion Cltrtv Inlrnmi.rnl For.lh.ill Has?- denl Publii ..lions Board. Viic-Chairman 



292 Senior Summaries 



;**« 



AfjLflPA 



) Chorale 

ilhemaliCs, BA; 



i nil 



Jqj Work. BSP; Child 

Sluh. KVate Club: Stu- c n Bs /i 
Exceptional Children ' 



EE. LENA^I , PsycheloBV. AB; Soeirjkujy. 
i D*$k I. 'SI Honor jb 



Alpha I^P&a A][ 
, Karate Si^Psi 



.En K lish/PolilicalScienW 



|^Udonor Roll. Phi Upsi- , 


_winkerJ 


■Ek^ Early Childhood 


MlTCHEjM 




Child W#ar 


2ft* Political Science/ 
e Republican Club; CoW 
Roll; Inlramurals. Base- 


MOBLEV, A 

■■"i"i". An 


ub, Presidenl. Men's Rt 
Bsic Educators NalionaP 
a WorWhop: Veteran^ 
nc^Klub; TiJtojai3.oc!™ 


jIpnpaVj 



F.K.V SB,: I Worl 



k 







— - V *- > 







>! '.'•ilium 



mi.., .. ■ , 

1 . 



Index 









Alhisi. Catherine Sue 83 
AlbBa. Eleanor Ann 114 
Albert, CtendaK 141 
ftlbertson. Paul 159 
Alden, Dorothy 164 
Aldan. Dorolh) 164 
Aldridne. Diane mi 
AldrideclohnT 141 

then Warn 



It4 



I ,.>139 



I 131.153 
Marie 84 



[i 
I 



',: ■ . 

I 

ichocll 
r. Dill 168 
Bill 

■ . ■ ■. .■ . die 192 

' ■ , i , , . 

lelor.paul ' . ; 9' 

ujIdwlor.Vii 

: ' 18 

Ba I 'a 

Butli n.Hi rbertl aril. 1.115.1 

ill, i, | u, ■ 
II S ndn ' 99 

' ! 

Ball!.- N . 

I7B 
■ ■ i . . 

: Marie 99 
I ' Coil 98 
Baxtcr.Rand 

Bayer. SI I 

I; : ... 

. . . i ' ' 
Bays Iheil ai B 
B, ii : •'. , . ; ( 

. •: ' 

I 
Beam. David Brett 66 
kieCarold 

..... 



Iorrier.|ohnlla 
: ■■ eryl 14 

Ben Vim iret 1 

" ■ 

:. ". ul :' 

B i i I, ,. 
loat.Ed rdPa 

■■.:■.. 

: 



■■ 



W.1H.1 



i 

d 



■ 




Bollon. Catherine 194.195 
Bond .Ann Kent 84 
Bend. |immy 187 
Bone.CloriaSuc-a4.lS8 
Bone. Tro> Lee 84 
Bonn. Donnie 187 
Bonner. Angela Sharp. 67 
Banner. William Russet.) 
Boone. David 152.182 
Boone. Deborah Leigh 115 
Boone. ]ames llerherl 115 
Boone. Roberl L 60 
Boone. Tommy 196 
Boose. Michael Culs^BBJ 
Bosley. David 181 fl 
Borsl. |anice Kay HflH 
Bosers. Ron 15 
Bosnick.D 
Bosl. De 




Bfmrn.r.H, 
Brimmer. Ho 
Br|nr.rl. limit; 



' 






.,117 







Drrirlifl m 



li 



1 i,m 



.... 
ihor.H .... ||, 

'. ■ .• . 





CuninfmaMrtoboii l ,.»» mi 







• I ■ 

is. John H , 




i 

., ; .... 


' 


: 




. . 


. ..ii, 


is.Lvnnl ■;■■ 


iho 



rd I 



I 
1 i id f ; r.incisH 



iu 

' : | |i 
II 



Diffee.Pam in 

,1 
Uildy.l 






lick.' 



I, '.. .. . 



Di 
















( 








( 




( 





! 

naKatner, 

1,-1 !. .• 
m ' 



Doll, Nancy Ellmil? 

Dalian, D«l 

Daly Th.im.isr 69 



- 
I ill 195 



□ ... ■ .... 
D .■ it] |o .. ■ |i 
■ , .: ,, 

I. Vtcki'i 
il 
: 




Dndson.Jam 

Dalan. Willi. 
Dollar. K.ni, 



Allen III 118.152 



Bllmm-r ,l.„v liinins 



Dmvil lii.lv 1 vin.-ii 
Divwd.t ,11... Ti ri'i . "ii 
Dowdy. Carl IM 

BhildonC «n 

Uovvlv . I.av.i. 

P.ilnu.i 1112 

nr.ilr.'.K.iil.; 




an 191 

t.kifil'IO 
711.151 

iilaiafi 

..«r<i|. hn 

Edm.,Bd«.n 
Edmundsoi. 
Edn.v, Larry 16" 

Edwards. H... 



Uwi-nlN 
\nn 87.14 



" 



- 

Erhi r Elmi 

Erhi Mich i 

Ervin Har... 

hrwa'., lain 

I 

nnl7J 

: : ■■ 











, : 






ma Ruin »" 1 




. 182 






ishoi l.ir 




ishoi Mi 


irvl82 


isher, Pal 


ii.la|can IIS 



n. Donald 6 

IV John Douglas 101 

Ihur 84.158 



iMari 



■■re. Rorin.,\ B 147 
cli Club 149 



, h. K,- 



■il, I. 



Bun 



',-■ 






Elllsli r. SVIIvi 

181' 
Eulsltr Slnnrl K.Hh. |i 71 
Evanmrsli.l 
Evans. Carolyn Rnlh 119 
Evans. Debro 
Evans Gary lames 102 
Evans. |uhn 190 
Evans ludil 
lis. karri 
koihyOal 

. slit! 102 
s. F'hileria Ann 110 

C Blair 87.182 



.Sani1iiiRutn7l 

B on DeVorull 

Sharon Icon 87 

lann e Matin 71 
T.v.sa Guyle 119 
■aid EwlynSu/an 
•aid |ill 18(1 
aid L.ndo Susan! 



FrodelfiV. (lid! 

I ruliyri Al . 

Fry. Barbara Lynn 119 
Fry ar William Din-war. 



Wm" 1 

SJBm.jBf 
CiM.s Bold 

Glbl>s. Bui 
Glbbs Kr. : 
Gd.si.n Bi i 



id 189 



■A i 













\nlhun> Ra; 119 

Lynn 119 
Norton R7.142141 
Ezzell. Frances Kurort 119 

Faddisji-.m 

rnesl William C.1 
Fabrenhnich. Kalhv Ann 102 

188 
Fuhrncr Alvin Arthur 61 




; lima Lynn. 8" 
[ichard Cass 71 I 

rllra.Jr 119.19 



■..i Lou 71 

I ; ulr)ic-i Sui 
Fulshiim Roller! 181 



... 
I . I i I . M ..' 

Kullun.Am 

Fulli.n.Fr.i. 

!n .hanlR.iv 1M 

lichaclloa 
ibBeflo71 

Fninlle Frances Kay 87 

David Sluorl 119.189 
linny 198 

Osllagher. Shawn 185 

I lair.- 71 







an, (nan 179 



i ! im.in Deborah L. 88 

Goodman Victoria Gale 103 

In' K, Catherine Irene 88 

' Ison Barbara F.I. 103 

Gordley.TranOI 
Gordon Belt) l.\nn 1211 
Gordon. Robin Piltmjn 120 
Gordon, Stephen Holt 88.191 
Corham, |anel Ethel 88.143 
Gorrie. Elizabeth Mad !i egoi 

103 
Gosnell. Linda Kaj 103.196 
Gosnell, Pamela Faye 103 
Gossett. Susan lean 12U 
Gould, luanlta Feye 103 
Gould. Waller Turlington. Jr 

72,154 

Gourley.Doug 186 

;e Malcol 



Gundi raon. Inns Norman 72 
Gunderson. Mark Charles 88 
Gunderson. Null Robert 120 
Gundlach. Herb L. 104 
Gunnells.]ohn100 
Cunter. Paula Jean 104 
Guplill. Richard lames 72, 153, 

164 
Cupton, David Creswell 120 
Guplon. Kyle Lynn 88 
Gurganus, Margaret Carol 72 
Gurganus. William 147 
Gurhi,Yukikiro150 
Gurkin. Brcnda Kaye 120 
Gurkin. |uckRnrjin 88.149 

Guthrie. lellen B 88 

Gulneck. Susie 169 
Gutierrez. Joseph Andres. |r. 



Hardy, Carolyn Rivers 104 

Hardy. Delttii Anne 104,146 
Hardy. Mary 164 

Hardy. Nancy Lynn 120 
Hardy. Phillip Anthony 8H 
(tare, Paul Rodman 88 
Hargell.lt Glenn. |r 104 

Hargelt. Sheila Bridgell 120 
Harkins. Sophia Springfield 72, 

176 



ow.lulte Mitchell 120 

nan. Andrea Lee 120.146. 

2,153.164.165 

non. Clennt. 104.144 

nun, Wendy 164 

old, Lynn 149 

er. |ane Carol 120 

er.Lowell 177.165.157 

er. Peggy 168 



Harlwell. ludilh Marie 86.178 
Harvey. Willie Hiawatha 104. 

198. 189 

Harward. Cheryl Lynn 104.198 
Haseley. Edward 181 
Haskelt. Karen |o 72,152.160, 

176.179 
Hasty, Palsie 179 
Hatch. Belly Lou 104 

Hatch. Debbie Ann 104 
Hatch, EdwyCrattan 121 
Hatch, [oseph Eugene 88 
Hatch, Marj Anne 121 
Hatcher. Rhonda Lee 104 
Hathaway, Jeffrey Harold 121 

Hathaway. Kandic.e Di.inne 7J 

Haubenreiser, Joan 72.158 
Hausafus, Cheryl O 61 
Haverty. Barbara Ann 104,144 
Wardlov, 183 

Hawfield. Hugh 187 
Hawkins. Betsy Ann 72 
Hawkins. Donna 149 

Hawkins. [ac(|tieliiic ~J140 



Herring Steve 193 
Herring. Susan 178 
Herring. William Bradley 89 
Hester, Chuck 187 
Hester. Deborah lean 73 
Hester. Erwin 170 
Hester Gail 178 
Hester, Wanda Kaye 121 
Hewett Gwenevere Dawn l; 
Hewitt. |udy 151 
Hewitt. Phil 151 
Hibbs, Billy 195 

Hickman. Nellie Frances 121 

153 
Hickman. Patricia Ann 73 
Hicks, Elizabeth Knnls 89 
Higgins. Helen Bridgell 121 
Higgiiu, lames Brian 73,151 
Higgins |ohn150 
Higginson. Nancy 182 
Flight, le.innelle Ellen 121 
Hightower. Faye 183 
H.ghne 

Hilberl Sheila Dru 73 
Hile. Patricia Cora 104 
Hill. Barhara Ann 121.146 

-U.ll j k .ii. tm. ina 
Hill Bill l»l 
Hill. Elnora Yvonne 8B 
Hill.CwendolynSherene 
Hill, Heard 190 

_Hill,Helgael 

aheth89 
I. I"acq15HflHrwB8B 
ill. |osvph A. 61.rn 
Hlll'.Marjori 
Hi ii Mat i. i 
■, [79 

Hill. Sara I 

.in 145 
a Van 121 




hire, Bev.-rl> Kst.:ll.. ins 
I liin.M 73.19S 
Susan ".I 
uml). Intdis G.i\ 73, 192 

«■-! I-.II 

Holu>n. Susan Lynn 89 
HnUI'T, Lastnr Bryce 73 
Holding Debra |ane ins 

:< Hv|r>173 
Holland |"hnny 192 
Holland. Rick) rhomasgS 
Holland I. resa Vnn ia 
Hollander l.in lames 121,191 
Molten. Mar> K.is.- 121 
Holloy, (snllaLo U !se73 
Holliilav. Raod 
Hollinijswopln 






issirnr.Taul 



hnvlTuw 
' i.mondNH 

ilMOranl Hill 1S7 1 




! IhfM 

l.on Id'.; 

In,,,. », I,.. 1 











































1 ., 


■■ J' 




M 








Ol 












M 


i 




HM 




M 




. PI] 






M 
M 


II,,., 

11,.,, 









, unaldVii Ini 75 
■ qui ■ . 

18:1 

II 

: ...... 

Marion. Marlhu Ann 107 

\1, ,,!,.,, Sh :,-.,. : ■ ■ 

■■• . . .... 





113 1 


lulherl 




. ; , 




: 




...: ■.. 


. 


1 




Nf.llrtWKI, l . 









.11 123 

McAHams Laurie -inn,- 12-1 

. 
McAdbn Marshall II I47.1M 

■| ■' 

179.1 'a 

- I, '.i, ... . li Iri <u I,,- 
IcAlisiei -. "I m- 

I, '.lohnMinlcr in 
McAlliilci 

.. i Patrick 
u; 
McCain Marilyn \ 124.168 

: am 1«" 
McCarlh) li 

McClcll mil Lloyd I lydi 10? 
■' 

Mii:l indon El I 12 

.1nClinlock.Su 
McCnll 




McCall.n. Karen |o 91 
McCaha. Marsha 163 
McGaughe\.Palricia Ann I 

142 

MfcGee. Bill 188 S 

McCee. Dullie 181 
McCut, |oe 181 
McGhee. Muriel Lucille 76 
McGinnis. Jeffrey A. 136 
inis.Melod) Anne 76 
nun, Leah Louise 62 
BHBMLL 76.178 
; : 

I. 

McK.iv Mark 16-1 
McKev. Rick i 

_McKtn*io.S-.l 
M. Kinnc> I in 



Ma 






MU.au. .n, Sean Much 124 
Md.j» nHiinilaRhinrk 

.Mel. .ml 

McLawl ..rn,l 

i 
McLean lo 
McLean uil 
Mcl.ell., G 
McLeml 
McLrnn a ' 
MeLenil' 

\'. i.i 1 

McLooil h,alrl\ la™ I 

Mcl-rod 

McMahai Patricia Li 
McMahuhPiilrici.. I 

I Uelluidli.nW 

7t».]fi3 

McMillan 1 1, 
McMillan 

ih.a 183 



McR.ro. lane M. 

MrKae. |n.i. II.. 
McR.ee Rill 1-1 



w 



MiHci Ii hen Brown lew 

Davirl 1U8.19 I 

■ IS2 161 
. 

| fl 191 

Millet Mil 



mil 




i .ir 1711 
Mia.r, ,R.n 

n 




I.Margurel ' 

(I Meal William II., 

an John 125 



[■„,.s|, I 



. Thomas Kiigcne 77 
\ ictorieC 109 



Owen, Laura Ann 125 
i 'wens', B< ii [SO 


Peacock lubilh ! nne 108 187 

['■'.Hi ,1V |1 || 


Owens, B, bbj Andrew 77 


I',..,,,, c irnl 1 nwb 12" 


QwensrDebSrah]oyc,77 




Owens. Donnic 193 






P, MCI 


Owens Kli/.ih, ■ihl.nn. 125 


Pearcr, 


i Iwens Gar! 192 




iwens, tame* Frodej h k- 125 


..-,■ 


lean lfli 


IV ,„. 11,. il, . 


1 twens, Jerome i S3 


Pearson, |e inn, 


Owens, Laura [42 




llwens. Linda 1 125 


Peebles, i 


Owens.M Kaihrvn77 185.162 


Peedih Fa) 


Owens. Phoebe B B2 


;.,,, ,| ]n | il|Ti u , ,, .,,,. 


Owens Teresa N1111 77 


Peele Ted Wallace 108 


lylei Barl 1 


Peelc.Sand] 185 


Ozmenl.1 in 




Pace. Cre« IH4 




Packer. Bell) luanlta 93 142 




Pai ki 1 Sam ) |i an 126 




I'.iiiy.ti. ijh.,H, , Edward 


P, -ram Gli ,„!., ... 



Page. David Randolph 12B 


Penfirlrf ! 


P.ige.EariVl 7: 




Page lane Mallinsun 93 




Page. Pamela Kaj "7 166 ibii 




Page. Willard Franklin |r B3 




Painter. Ronald Allen 




Pales Gerryl lain, 93 




Palmer, John Raymond 73 




Pappas.lanirs ISO 




Pa«tiie,RebeicaAiui93 




Pardue Stephen Wayne 125 




Parker ■Nnn,,.,. 11, ,„ 


Perkins Ki 


Parker, BarbaraFranc.ea93.IB4 


159 


Parkei.KimKli/ahelh 125 




Parker Margan 1 \n,,e 109 


Perrin.Toi 


Parkor.Mary Bethany 93 




I'.,rk.,,M,ll„ ,(;,„s„ n u-, 




P^r. Roger Darlington 93 





I Edward 76.1M, 



I'h.Mii Alpl, , I 

Phillips Chi ■■■ 
Phillips, fiail ' 

■■ in 

ftiHips.Knlhryn Martin 93 
Phillips' (Cathy M ,M it.H 

id Craig 125 
Phillips. Ranilall Steve 93 
Phillips. Richard IB! 

Phillips Robert DaleJB 
Phillips. Rosa, if 1 
.,„ 198 



auric 126 

. 1 16 

P , I ,.. 

„,,..,. 1(19 
"', 
Post U„y, „„„[. I, , 

n 141.170 

la, is 

1 urtisLoelM 

Li 109 144 

: 109 

. Man 126 

Powell. Ka(hon Marie 93 
Powell. Richard Wayne 78 130 

177.165 
Powell. Rulh Elizabeth 109 






I' n. 1,., \,,lv,,.; 

, .alius 11 Louis, 
Pj-evdtt.l , ,1 



I'm.. Deborah U([ 

I',, , Dawes Weslej 78 162 
Prim DonnaCarol93 142 



'rice Wayne Ml 
rice. Wesley 186 

I rrj Lynn 121 

■ . Bets; I'.', 109 

ridgen Mar) I 
rlnc, Barhare Susan it 
rim d Cath) Su, 93 1111 
, lamesRictmrdso 

113 



III 



Prince. Ricky 197 

. 

: 
i',„, lor, Carol ^nn»3 1 12 mi 
"■ n ild Fred, ri, 1 le'i 

Proctor. Sandra Rose 126 



ilary 

:■,,, . II ■ ,. ■,,. 1 Mu, hell " 
Purkson ten 111 
Purvis. I 

■ , , , 

i 



Radford, Mike !94 199 
Radford, Pamela Ami 126.152 
Ragan. Phyllis Kay 126 



Raines. |ohn Ellloll 94 198 
Rains Donald.Butlei tin. 154 
Rains LindaSmhtl < 
Rains. Lynwi ... 

■ ml Bradl, 1 1 16 1 M 

Rambaau. Rebecca Ann 128 
Rambeau. William 198 

Rambo. |ohn W.01. „ 110.194. 



„„s,|„ 



144,1114 



Ramsey, (nseph II |r 44 
Ramsey. Mildred 162 
Ramsey. Renal, I Wayne 7B.J 
Ramsey. Wanda Manno- 7a 
Randle. Bonn) IS5 
Randolph, Amelia Cwin 126 
Randolph. Rand) 166 



Rap, 



Rat, till |im 198 
Ratclifl .Patricia |„il4 
Rati llfle I ,11., I' 63.1B1 

,., Nancy |oyn.-. no 
R.ulill Robert William 76 
Rawls.lullanH ,|r 63 
Ray. Constance |, .,,,114 
Ray. Larry I 
Ray 1.1,1,1a Sue 110 
Raybin. Jacqueline P nil 
Ray/urd. Blanche Rulh 110 
Read FlovdM 63 
Reii\-ns, Sidney |ucklon 94.166 
Reavis.Wid Charles 78 186 
Rebel 160 

Rcbello. Laurie Ann 1211 
Rodd.Cimh 126 
Redding. L.uhy Mi 1 
Redding Saln.v DwighIM 
Redding 1 1,11111.,, Mom ,, 79 

143.02 
Ruddy, Brigid Eilndn lln.isi 
Ri Iwin, |, ii, - , !.,,,« 126 
Re, ce.Charloi Parks. ]r, 1111 
Re, 1 ,- Mil , Di.me 1111 
Reed. Deborah \n„ lit 
Rv,.,i Jo Anne 11,, 

Reed. Thomas Ih4 

Reep. laaine 167.176 
Reep.RoxanneChrislin, 1 10 
Reeves. Carol 196 

Regan. Duncan Cabell 110 

Reganhardt, Pam ma 

Register, lulu e. l ',.; 
RehnvCharles Richard 120 
Rei.l, |ohann.i 183 
Reiehslein. Marie 197 
Reid.Beverl) l„ 110 
Reld. Vni.iiiSns.il, '14 
Reioharl. William I. 14,1 153. 



1H4.1 



Re 






. Sli. 



Renie, Huherl 149.150 
Respass Br, . ' 1 

R ' . ■ Bon :• .-,. 

Connie Mi 
Review Board lfli 

tinlds.l 
Reynolds. Jonicclyrm 1 

Rhea. Hi, 1 16 

Shod Di i,i,i. flu 
Kli,:,i, -. Mai |.,e, ! to 
Rhodes, Scotl t8B 
' . I brleluphi 1 Mi ,, 



Ric, : :..'.. 
Rich.Cand 
RH-h.DanaD bli 

Ricl ingel 14 

rl II 96 

R, 11 



. Ma, 



rdson, Bennett 

12,1 

Richardson I s 

Richards,,,, . ■■ 

Richardson 1 

Richey.Sarol 

11 

h inn 1 in 

Riddle. !'..,:!<' ,»e 94 
Riddle. (1, vie 149.184 
Riddle. Martha ' 
Riddle. Robbie 181 



Riddle. SLisan198 
Ridge. Sieve Watson 12.. 
Ruuis. Donna 188 
8iois,SunR.6),iai 
Riggs. rhomasW |r 94 
'-. ■ Paul Keith 14(1 
Higsbee, Sarah 159 



Salt 



.Theodore Henr- 



. I ill, 



,188 



Rigsby i 

Rilev. On 

Riley. Ch 

Kil. : .. M.-lin.l.i Mai-Hare 

Ring, Dennh 

: none Anno 
Ripper. Edward Henry I 

IBS 
Ripp, 






1 III I 



Rippy, Bill 

iiSI.-rhnu-i 

Rivcnbark H 

limit III! 

Rivenbark. Pans) vl.-ne 
Rive.iB.Rol 



Roundfree, Edha Rin, 


"Ml III'. 


H . .ii nu . ■>■ Nancy Con 


lelu 12 


I'm, lllll, ■.■ Will. .Ill,, 11 


r-'l 


Rolise. Beverly Susan 


79.160. 


RouSu, B ■ 179 




Rouse. Gr.ig.iae 


[Jtfft 


Rouse. Iris Hard 




Rouse. Lind, ■ 




Ri.»<.O.nli.«n,:l.u, 




Rowc.Lor. ll.i |o,,nl2 




Rows SI,, ri 


It! 


Ruwoll.Ronn 




i aurDEltaal 


.elh 123 


ib 175 IM 








Royall. BUI ISO 








RilddleS,, 








'...id Wayne 




Rally, Mi i. 


r.Z 


Rundle.n.;o ! -.5 Inn 





eollO 



Saver. Cynlhia Ann 79.183 
Saver. Sandra I, yn 127,18:1 
Sayella. Thomas Charles 63 
Sazama. Robin Kathleen 111 
Schaffer. Debbie Lynn llll 
Schaler. David D 79,197 
Scharf. Rav 63.197 
Schenck. Marj Ell 
Schifrel.Krh.ird Paul III 94.197 
Schiller. |,ine 163 
Schink, Don 195 
I 

CaiJ 110 
s. luii.lil, Unda 181 

Si.hmidl . 

I ■..].. 'Ill .11 

S, hmi.il 



Sheek. 


Camil 


laD 


awn 


lit 


Shell,] 


e.iiini. 


i 111 






Shelloi 


i.B.II 1911 






Shelloi 


i. Fran 




Ann 


127,185 


Shelloi 


, |ohn 


Alb 


erl 1 


11 


Shelloi 


. Marj 


ori. 


I.I 


,l!'.| 


Shephi 


■rd. Fr. 


inci 


- 1)11 


v.d 79 


Shephi 


ird.Sh 


op 1 


47 




Sl.,.|,li..|,l Si 


•ven 


mo- 




Shephi 


id So 


.Ml. 


le n 


III 




,r,l i 1, 


,T 1 







s, I,,, 



Ro 



, 1114 



Schmidtkc Mart 1. B4 

Sihn.llp 
Si.lv.th Ted, I I9S 

Schuherl 




I'lll 



l.Xnnl 
Rohorson. Kuost 

Roberts. Marlh.. 
Roberts. Steve i. 
Robertson . -i. u 
Roberlson. Har. 

Roberlson, |ennn. I 
Robertson |uhn 187 
Robertson. Joseph : . 
Roberlson. Paulette 
Roberlson. lonuiu. 
192 



185 
Robins,.-: 
Robinson R 
Robinson. Sharon : 
Robinson. Wil 

Rockwell I. 

Riidi! . K-. i.i 
Rodman. John 187 

, 
larhai 

, 
- . inn 94 lai 
Rogers. Donna Louise till 

Rogers. |iu! L ; , i ji 

try Chi islian 126 
Rogers Mart Kimberl, 
Rick 144 

bin Ragle 79 
Rogers, Roy William 111) 
Rogers, Vickie Elisabeth 127 
Rrigerson. Ebbie |, ,94,178 
Rogers,. n. |,i, in Carol 11(1 
Rogerson. Nancy Deborah 79, 

162 
Rollin5.Ferrelll.ce. |r. 127 
Rollins. |olia Ann 1111 
Romer.Karenl.ee 110,183 
Romila. losej.h 17U 
Ronzo. Elizabeth Marie 79.W1 
Rood. Harriel 169.176 
Rook.KalhyTcrese79 
Rooker, Thomas Rcid 127 
Roper. Mike 195 

Rose. Linda 

Rose. Rhet., ' 

Ira l.-an94 
Rosenberg. Hat id Philip 110 
Ross. Bill,. K 



s 
s. 


'1 






J 168 18- 


s 


It, 


*r. Buddy l: 






s, 

S.i 


,ll 
ll 






llil 


s. 






VI, I..M,- 111) 


S.i 




s Slan lot 







Sanders Brood,. I 

.,-.-, ,,79 

Sanders. I- 

Sanders. |...-v 188 
Sanders s 

Sanlurd -„; , 

■ • -1,1 IZ7 14,,, 

- 
I 
: 

irrel Dennis 188 

,:,.,-,,,,, , 
llerl Id.Dorn 
Soil 

■ 

S.iiils.R,. | 

Sauls. Dean Preslon 94 

1 hen Harper 94.166 
Sauls.SheilaAnnl27 
Bob 192 

, .,,,,1 Ellen 127 
Saunders. Frank W. 83 

, Frank W..|r. 78 

Saunders. |,, H 1,1 
Saunders, kirk Vnung 79,170 

Saunders. Linda Rh; 

Saunders, Mary Jo 110,182 
Saunders 

182 

skip 148 
Sanse Mi.Tuel R., 

odney 159 



Sell (1 


avid 




154 




Sedan 


■\!.: 


la Louis. 


■ 127 




Sellor- 


Bor 


mieSur 


"9 




Sellei 


'..,i 


1. V 185 






Senlei 


lata 


iePbill, 


. 127 




Sessioi 


is la 


netYvoe 


ne 7* 




Season 


is B. 


irl 179 






Settle 


Willi 


el. -i.i: 


18.181 





,.Hai 

Sexlon. Johnnie Kdv.,i 1: 
Seykora. Edward [. 63 

i-an Buskell '., 
- ., i irfici iv : 
SGALeeislalin. 162 
Shackelford, Ern.ul Dahr 



Srha 
shar 



rd Li 



lVasant63 
a Elsie 111 
Shall, ,,,.,,, ; 

'14,147,162 
Shallcrossjuhn. Simon 11 

, . a -, 

ShankUl. Georgia Ann 94 



: ii 



ml. 



Sharp .Inn 

Sharp, i . 

187,172 

Sharplei 

134 
Shaw. Mel 

188 
Shaw. Purler 189 
Shaw, Su 

Shaw. Vicki Lynn 12 
Shcab8.cn. Peggy 181 

Shea. Iannis H 83.178 

. Shea. Michael R 95 195 

Sh.-.irin DehorahMariei 
She., no. Harriel l i igh78 
S'heann. Karl l.tnn 127 
Sbepfin Sleten Asl„r7'l, 



.elia Ill 



181 



SI.,, ,1 M.nlh.i 158 
Shorl Shell., Marlon 
Shortl, Hobby |,n- 111 



Sl.,,1 



. iker, lion. ,1,1 HiiwardT 1 
178 161 
Sibley. Ba rbara Ra) 79 , , 

mI, I,-, I. Bryan 111.194.1,111 
jj sdjlta:. Richard Dixon95 
JSsr^BHHijn Erik 167.164 
sigmo <\lph„ I. a., is.) 



Stive |.,mos 1-9.r,t 
Simmonds. Stephen 169 
S.mmons. (and |o79 



i. Lynda Mai 



■tbglelonTTflSlk^M 
Sink. Stephss/^H 95.190 

S.p. -.Shu ley Dale 127 
Sitlerson.SueByrdBi) 

Ski llj i ,,,-,, , 

SI illir,,,,,, si, -ve 164 165 



: 111 



185 

Slaule l ,l».,i 



SI., 






Sloan. |o Ann, .nil !42 
irol 93.178 
,i.r95 
Slopp) K.,t |e.in 127 153 
Small UdliumF 95 
Small Yvonne Ft . . 

Smollw |, |,ii .11, ii.,, I i : 

Smaltwood.Shirii 

Sm, I.-,. Linda Susan ill 19*7 
Smilh, Man 150 15- 
Snnlli. Molly (o 1 1 1 

Smith. Beverly |..> in ii." 

Smilh. Brad 197 

, , . -,.. . 
173 
Smilh.Carl 



Smith, Carol E. 159 

Smilh. Clarissa 176.178 
Sniilh..Cynlhi,iMilK 1 11 
Smjlh, David Curtis 95 
Smith. Ceorge Franklin |i 
Smiln. Godrge i'iuinlhi 95 



no, II, |„ 



Smilh, |„,-„ I 

i , ,,,-,1-ir, 







Smilh. -Sliu! 

!m ilh. Stephwi Randall 

iinilli.Sleie:. 

ninth, Vern-.i 

imilli. Virgn,, 

.mill,. U'illhimuVvd 8(1 

unill, WDlian 

. n lennings 
-milt,, William Marlin 9! 
• rallhsUn. Lav 



ah Drake 126 
I Woods in 



E 



Spe 



tea 



Speighl. Vivian Mane 8 
Spoil Robert Glenn 95 
Speller. Nancy Louise i 



'-,- 



Rob.-rl 1-9 
r. Robert Edu 



u 


ae.ni 


•r. l.ind.i K.i 


. 96 152.171 




173.165 




w 


agm 


:r.\.inc\ E 


96 


w 


awn. 


ir.Rebecca 


M. 96 


w 


aest 


iff. lames T 


aylor. |r. 1 




ahm 


.in. Alice 1(19 






^^G.81 1i 


i6.161 

rv Arndiei 




- 






.'. 

















Weavei Marj Evelyn82.17 
Weaver. Mike 195 
Webb. Billie Denn Hi 
Webb. Curl. si 
Webb. Dena 167 
Webb, Donna Lynn 82 
Webb.EliiabelhMcGinnes 
Webb, George Howard 9" 
Webb Kalhryn Delanie 97 
Webb. Use Iris 82 
ebb.Marei. In 11 

.Alien ir 



Whin 


■hurst Anil.i Rhodes 113 


Whin 


ihursl i alhj Sue 82.142 


Whiti 


ihursl I'le.l 139 


Whil. 


iKural.Marie '..i. lie 12 


Whin 


ihursl. Sharon Reneu 82 


Whili 


iley, James Craig 113 


WImI, 


■sell Dwighl Lee 111 


Whiteside Mar\ Marearel IK 


Whil. 


■side. Mimi 183.162 


Whill 


•side, Robert 179 


WhIH 


ord.Mars Susan 129 


Whill 


art. Richard Oliver 113 


Whill 


ey. Beverly Ann 129 


Whill 


ey, Beverlj Sue 82 


Whill 


ey, Charles Douglas 82 


Whill 


ey. Dolores Scrubs 97 




|te|lla Parks 129 



,. William I..-. 



Williams. SlevenClar 
Williams. Thiiiiii, lit 
Williams. Tyrone 184 
Williams. Vicki |ean8 

Willi. 
Willi 

Willi! 

Williamson Will. 
Wiliiford,Kalh. < 



Wilhliiril.P.Mh,., 
Willis, Donna |e 
Willis . I.ur.s Am 
Willis Man!... ' 
Willis, Mi.h.iel' 
Willis. I'.-itiina 1 
Willis Shelby, I 
Willis. Thorn a 
Willis. Tommr 
Willis. Williar, 




' ' ■ 



ir.k Manila Sue 82 





SPECIFICATIONS 

PUBLISHKD BY: The students of East 
Carolina University, Greenville, N. C, 
under the auspices of the ECU Publi- 
cations Board. 

PRINTED BY: Delmar Printing Com- 
pany, Charlotte. N. C, by offset litho- 
graphy. 

PRESS RUN: 7.50(1. 
TRIM SIZE: 9x12. 

BINDING: Smyth-sewn, rounded and 
backed, with head and footbands. 
COVER: Design debossed on brown 
cordoba material and enhanced with 
black overtone; brass die by Robert 
Fritsch. New Port Richey. Florida: 
type setting by Uiggins Typography, 
Charlotte, N. C; made by Delmar 
Printing Company. 

ENDSHEETS: 65# Hopper Brown Sky- 
tone. 

TIP-INS: 65# Hopper Brown Skytone; 
type setting by Higgins Typography. 
PAPER STOCKS: Pages 17-48 on 80# 
Champion kromekote; pages 273-288 
on 70# Westvaco contemporary matte; 
remaining pages on 80# Westvaco 
gloss enamel. 

INK: Superior Printing Ink Company, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

TYPE STYLES: Headlines: Melior; 
Century Bold Condensed; Valentine; 
Univers; Libra; Verger; Harlem; Kim- 
berly; Bold Outline; Quentin. 
Body Copy: Melior medium, bold, 
bold italic, and italic. 



COLOR: Four color from combination 
of 35 mm. and 2"-i x 2'/j transpar- 
encies; color separations by Graphic 
South. Charlotte, N. C. and Delmar 
Printing Company. 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

EDITORIAL STAFF: Carleen Boyd; 
Debra Carson; Pat Fountain; Jeanne 
Hagen; Kathy Jones; Kim Kuzmuk; 
Nancy Leggett; Gary McCullough; 
Chris Mills; Patsy Mills; Will Pittman; 
Monika Sutherland; Rick Tombs; 
Mrs. Mary Sorensen, Advisor. 
PHOTOGRAPHY: Class portraits by 
Smith Studio, Raleigh, N. C. All pic- 
tures not otherwise credited are by 
Publications Board photographer Guy 
Cox and his staff, with the following 
exceptions: page 4 (lower left) and 
page 5 (top right) by Ross Mann; page 
2-3, 6 (left), 7 (right), 8. 9. 11 (top and 
bottom right), 15, 24, 205, 200 (bottom 
left and right), 207, 233 (bottom left 
and right), 234 (top right), 260-261, and 
262 by Bob Anderson; photo on page 
18 (lower left) bv Steve Forest. 



BUCCANEER % 

FAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY • A 



suutfAl COLLEGE 



UtNtKAL CULU 



30372 0142 7563 7